The New York-based Eadie, 29, is best known for her accessible, yet educated, approach to fashion. Based in San Francisco when she launched the blog, Eadie has worked as a merchandiser for brands like Gap and Tory Burch, which means she has a professional edge when it comes to outfit posts. And brands like love working with her because she has a reputation for converting readers into shoppers. 
About Blog Fashion Talks, produced in partnership with CAFA, is a podcast that observes the world through the lens of fashion. Join host Donna Bishop as she interviews designers, stylists, industry insiders and even those outside fashion to reveal insights, observations, personal stories and historical moments on how fashion helps to shape the world we live in and how our world shapes fashion and the clothes we wear.
There was basic black — this is fashion week, after all — and monochrome white (the new black?) on the runways of Paris, but some of the season’s most energetic looks put it all on the table, with graphic treatments of black and white. For the bravest and boldest among us, there are stripes (at Dries Van Noten), checkerboard checks (at Balenciaga) and bifurcated blocks of color (at Louis Vuitton): racing gear, even if only for the rat race. — M.S.
Dress For Women, Not For Men:The Man Repeller once told us that if women dressed for men, we'd all be wearing bodycon miniskirts and dresses. This is why we have to dress with other women in mind. It actually makes getting dressed easier when you're dressing for style, not for sex, and your confidence will shine through because you'll be more comfortable in what you're wearing.
Hi! I'm editor-in-chief of Rookie, a website for teenage girls that I founded in 2011. Every year we put out a book that compiles the best content from that year of the site. Our most recent is Rookie Yearbook Three, published by Razorbill. It is just over 350 pages, and in addition to loads of beautiful artwork and writing are print-exclusives like stickers, valentines, a Rookie pennant, and contributions from the likes of Dakota and Elle Fanning, Shailene Woodley, Lorde, Grimes, Kelis, Sia, Broad City, Bob's Burgers, and more.
To play it safe, combine a neutral, like flax, with something bolder, like yellow. But think twice about pairing intense hues with black, which "can look dated," says designer Chris Benz. For something punchier, try two colors that are beside each other on the color wheel, such as coral and orange. Not sure where to begin? "Notice what colors you love and respond to in your decor," says Benz.
WHAT YOU CAN DO TODAY: The simplest change you can make is to start following stylish people on places like Instagram. It’ll give you a double whammy: It’ll expose you to great style and give you some inspiration, but it’ll also create an environment where dressing well is “normal”. Need some stylish Instagram recommendations? Check out this post I wrote about my favorite stylish Instagrams here.

About - A Denver girl, born and raised - I love sharing my knowledge of our adorable city with a passion for style and connecting people. I started Denver Darling as a fun way to share my experiences with fashion, food, and fun with friends. I live in the Lohi neighborhood of Denver with my husband, Jonny, and our golden retriever Downtown Charlie Brown.


“Fashion shows are for transporting people,” Balenciaga designer Demna Gvasalia told Vogue this season, “otherwise there’s no point.” His show was one of the season’s most surreal transports. He compared working on a collection presentation to working on a movie, and in fact, it was Luc Besson’s studio on the outskirts of Paris where he held his show, in a digital tunnel that dripped, melted and swooped through a simulated reality. It was the work of the digital artist Jon Rafman, whom Gvasalia had met at Art Basel, and the effect was practically mind-melting, a digi-dystopia for an elegant but surreal collection.
Then Kelly tried to review her current situation objectively. She realized that she only needed a short break for herself — from work and her just broken-up relationship. She really needed some time to clear up her mind before moving on with her work and life. When she got her emotions settled down from her heartbreak, she started to work on improving her business’ selling points and looked for new investors that are more suitable.
WHAT YOU CAN DO TODAY: Go to a store that you would consider out of your budget. A place that might even be uncomfortably expensive for you. You don’t have to buy anything. Just walk around, touch the clothes. Maybe even try something on. Make mental note of how things fit, feel, and how you feel wearing it. Then go to a fast fashion shop like Zara or H&M and try similar items on. Make note of what’s different and what’s similar. Anything surprising? 

This is where you should start – there’s no room for change if you don’t make it yourself. Open up your closet and take a good look at your clothes. You should ask yourself one simple question – if you were in a store right now, what items from your closet would you buy? It’s a very simple and quite efficient game you should play once in a while. If you want to stop spending hours in front of your closet, it needs to be neat and color coordinated – hoarding clothes always leads to a mess. All clothes you decide need to go shouldn’t be thrown away – donate them! That way, you’ll feel good about it.
Fashion’s most unflattering women’s wear trend is far from a spot in our rearview mirrors. Skintight bike shorts pedaled their way onto scores of runways once again this season, having first emerged as a ’90s throwback reference at Off-White this time last year. At Fendi, in a look sported by Bella Hadid, they were long, navy and spandex, with shimmering streaks and a matching leather waist belt. At Roberto Cavalli, Paul Surridge presented a pair for after dark, in ochre with blue sequined embroidery. Over in Paris, the first look from the new creative director at Mugler, Casey Cadwallader, was an oversize, seamed black blazer and — you guessed it — matching biking shorts. And Jacquemus opted for an unforgiving knitted tangerine variation, to be worn with an oversize white shirt and the swagger of someone comfortable with having everything on show. Saddle up! — ELIZABETH PATON, European correspondent, Styles
×