You cannot move forward if you choose to look backward. My Uncle Joe, who was an Ojibwa, married to my cousin, often said as long as the chiefs can keep my people hostage on reserves they'll never amount to anything. Joe was a wise man, wiser than all the politicians and and self serving chiefs, because one day the younger generation will leave the reserves and become full participants in society, hopefully enjoying equal benefits as well as equal responsibility.
The New York Times "Style" section writer, Eric Wilson, did an extensive study on the impact of fashion bloggers on the fashion industry for one of his style columns. Wilson wrote that these bloggers have ascended ‘from the nosebleed seats to the front row’ in the past year and that the divide between the ‘high code’ editors with a professional opinion and the ‘amateur’ fashion bloggers is beginning to disintegrate. Wilson interviewed prominent publicists, editors and designers. Publicist Kelly Cutrone stated that over the past two years, there has been a complete change in who is writing about fashion. Not only does Cutrone say she needs to keep a watch on the editors of mainstream writings, such as Vogue and Elle, but now she needs to monitor on the millions of fashion bloggers around the world. Cutrone goes on the later state that once these bloggers post anything on the internet, it never comes off, and it now becomes the first thing that the designers will see.[5]
WHAT YOU CAN DO TODAY: Go to a store that you would consider out of your budget. A place that might even be uncomfortably expensive for you. You don’t have to buy anything. Just walk around, touch the clothes. Maybe even try something on. Make mental note of how things fit, feel, and how you feel wearing it. Then go to a fast fashion shop like Zara or H&M and try similar items on. Make note of what’s different and what’s similar. Anything surprising?
Blogger Krystal Bick is the woman behind "This Time Tomorrow," a fashion blog that covers style, travel, art, dating, and other topics related to living in New York City. A transplanted West Coaster, Krystal's fashion vibe is a true blend of East and West coast American style (or you could say, girlfriend meets boyfriend style). Her looks tend to gravitate toward classic, tailored pieces inspired by menswear, but often with feminine and quirky accents thrown in, such as a pair of cropped patterned trousers, a silky blouse, high heel pumps, and an over-sized men's watch. More »

Vancouver, Canada–based blogger Vanessa Hong manages not only her wildly successful blog, The Haute Pursuit, but also her accompanying fashion line, THP Shop, which is beloved by editors and street style stars alike. She's also a mainstay at every fashion week and a street style star in her own right—photographers love shooting her uniquely edgy, contemporary style.
How to actually do it: "Don't give people too many things to look at all at once," says Halbreich. "If you're wearing a low-cut dress, focus on the cleavage—you don't also need bare arms and legs." The concept applies to fit as well: A body-hugging dress is better with a more sensible neckline and hem, whereas a skirt that hits a few inches above the knee won't raise eyebrows if it's flared rather than tight.
After a massive change of direction in life, just a few weeks ago, I launched a fashion blog (of sorts) after a career of copywriting. Being new to photography (SO much to learn) and writing predominantly how-to posts is certainly time consuming, and for now, I’m just sticking with weekly posts so I can keep the quality high. I spent just as long putting together my about page.
"Well, really, our memories are all we have, and even those we think of as "real" are made up. Art can condense experience into something greater than reality, and it can also give us permission to do or think certain things that otherwise we’ve avoided or felt ashamed of. The imagination is where reality lives; it’s the instant lie of backwash from the prow of that boat that we think of as cutting the present moment, everything following it becoming less and less "factual" but no less real than what we think of as having actually occurred."
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