These are only a few marketing strategies to take into consideration. Ensure that you place a high value on social marketing because the imagery of a fashion blog works well on social media platforms. On top of that, social media and blogs account for 23% of internet users time spent online—and over 80% of all American’s frequent social media and blogs.

I have been thinking a lot lately about what validates an emotion/event/observation, makes me feel like it really happened and I really lived it, and this seems like the right occasion to word-vomit these ideas. (Plus, I miss having time to keep this thing going, and I do feel an obligation to people who have read my blog for a long time that is not unlike the unspoken understanding you have with your first best friend, the one who watched you like stupid bands and stupid people and embarrass yourself and cry a lot, whose insight into whatever you do from now on is shaped by a unique knowledge of all the ties which bind New You to Old You, and who refrains from bringing up in front of new acquaintances that time you were on the 8th grade hip-hop team in the interest of letting you become more of yourself. In other words, we had a time, but there's so much time ahead, and it is, somehow, at the same time, quickly running out.)


The ‘80s have been back for quite a few seasons now, but there seems to be no stopping this trend. In past seasons, designers have referenced the decade’s big shoulders and glam hues. This season, many designers brought in acid-washed denim. The trend kicked off in New York, with Proenza Schouler sending out a bevy of almost whitewashed denim dresses, trousers, and jackets, and culminated in Paris, where Chanel, Dior, and Stella McCartney jumped on board.
Everything is now a matter of life and death. Math homework: NOT A PRIORITY WHEN THE END COULD BE RIGHT AROUND THE CORNER. Cleaning my room: IS THIS REALLY HOW I WANT TO SPEND MY LAST HOURS ON EARTH WHEN I COULD GET HIT BY A CAR TOMORROW? Etc. The habit that blog-keeping instilled in me of compulsively archiving every single thing only worsens. If I get behind in my journal, I spend hours wondering where to even start. I can't pay attention in class, only make scattered notes where there should be a timeline of the Industrial Revolution, listing all the details I need to get down properly as soon as I have time: The music we listened to in Claire's room, the old man I saw on my way to school, the view from my boyfriend's car when we sat in a 7-Eleven parking lot watching people walk in and trying to predict their purchases, along with a record of what each person looked like and what they bought. My hands tremble, relaxing only once everything has been sufficiently documented, each memory in my grasp, as if by putting them down on paper, I can make them last forever.
If you already love and wear a particular brand, don’t just ask to be added to the list—also let the agency know why your blog would be an excellent fit and send links of posts where you’ve worn the brand before. Also try directly reaching out to emerging brands that may not be large enough to have their own agency—they’re likely excited to grow their own following and eager to work with you.
The OG fashion blogger and best friend of Fashion Toast's Rumi Neely, the New York-based, Philippines-bred Bryan Grey Yambao has transformed from an online-diary keeper to a celebrity and fashion insider. While other bloggers from his era have fallen off the map, Yambao, 32, has remained relevant by branching out. Memorable projects include a collection with furrier Adrienne Landau and a hosting spot on several seasons of "America's Next Top Model."
Many of her posts are highly visual – showcasing the same types of images usually shared on Instagram. This is particularly relevant in her OOTD (Outfit of the Day) category. She shares luscious photos of her day, detailing everything she wears. Kyrzayda provides links to where you can buy what you like. Her followers apparently like to share her OOTD. There are always plenty of comments from her fans giving her opinion on the outfits.

Sunday was the five-year anniversary of this here blob, which I've neglected in the past months in the interest of Rookie, high school, friends, sleep, and other things. Aside from that, I don't feel like I have much to say, or rather, I prefer now to say it in private. My most recent journal is my favorite thing I've ever made, and nobody will ever see it.
Dress Your Age: Janice Dickinson doesn't look 57, but she is. We're not going to lie, she looks great, but let's face it, it's a tad tacky when 50-somethings try sporting an outfit you'd normally find on 20-somethings — and vice versa. However, tinsel town allows celebrities more leeway than the real world does for us ordinary folk. As a rule of thumb, stick to age appropriate attire.
It may seem contradictory to the current sociopolitical climate that the sexy and glamorous ’80s are back, but they are—although not in a Krystle Carrington of “Dynasty,” or Madonna circa “Holiday” sort of way. This time around, the way to do the ’80s is to choose one or two pieces or one accent color to get the vibe. Think pops of bright color, rather than an entire outfit in a shocking bright shade.
The blogosphere has indeed opened up many doors for the fashion industry, one of which is allowing the ordinary people to partake in the 'elite' fashion world and discuss their likes and dislikes on the way fashion is presented in the media.[6] In 2008, the Pulitzer Prize winning fashion writer and former blogger Robin Givhan, claimed that fashion blogs had democratized the fashion industry. Givhan had also written in Harpers Bazaar that 'The rise of the fashion blogger has evolved [fashion] from an aristocratic business dominated by omnipotent designers into a democratic one in which everyone has access to stylistic clothes...the average people, too often estranged from fashion, is not taking ownership of it'.[7] A similar statement was said by Constance White, the style director for E-bay and former fashion journalist, saying that the impact of the fashion blogosphere has allowed the whole population to take ownership of the fashion world, including people of all different races, genders, and social standings.[8] The Daily Mail writer Karen Kay suggested once in an interview that blogs allow anyone to both critique and praise designers, regardless of the often ‘needed’ professional opinion, with the help fashion blogs, the consumers are helping to set the trends.[9]

You might accurately describe Alyson Walsh as the Alexa Chung of her generation: She prefers wearing a good pair of jeans and a T-shirt over anything too fussy. She writes that she started her blog, That's Not My Age, with one mission: "I've always strongly believed that you don't have to have youth to have style, and I wanted to share ideas and celebrate inspirational women (and men) of all ages."


The ‘80s have been back for quite a few seasons now, but there seems to be no stopping this trend. In past seasons, designers have referenced the decade’s big shoulders and glam hues. This season, many designers brought in acid-washed denim. The trend kicked off in New York, with Proenza Schouler sending out a bevy of almost whitewashed denim dresses, trousers, and jackets, and culminated in Paris, where Chanel, Dior, and Stella McCartney jumped on board.
Know Your Arch: Shoe shopping? Make sure you know your arch type. In an interview with the folks at The Fashion Spot, Erica Lynn Stanley, design director of ...me Too shoes, said the best way to determine your arch is to step on a piece of paper after wetting the bottom of your foot. You can determine whether you have a normal, flat or high arch by examining your wet footprint. If the middle part of your footprint doesn't show up, you have a high arch, but if you can see most of your footprint then you have a fairly flat arch. Your arch is normal if you see half of your wet footprint. Source:The Fashion Spot
Women’s fashion week, men’s fashion week — for a few shows, it was everybody’s fashion week, an acknowledgment that the orthodoxies surrounding gender are, at least in certain corners of the world, eroding as we speak. At Maison Margiela, there were bows on boys and suits on girls, and videos of models proclaiming that breaking rules was “My Mutiny.” (It turned out that Mutiny is the name of Margiela’s new fragrance, and that social movements are as co-optable for profit as anything else. Buyer beware.) But there was a genuine sense of play at upstart shows like Luar and Vaquera in New York and the newly rebranded Courrèges in Paris, a refreshing agnosticism about who could (and would) wear what. Who wears the pants? We does! — M.S.
About - Described as "The authority on Miami fashion" by GUESS. Ria counts brands like Revolve Clothing, Bacardi, Teen Vogue, Kia, and Wildfox Couture, amongst her list of clients. She has been featured in prestigious publications such as Elle Magazine, Marie Claire, Seventeen and more. Ria aims to inspire by documenting her journey as it comes and captivating audiences all over the world.
He wasn’t the only designer to incorporate artwork into the runway experience. At Loewe, Jonathan Anderson installed several rooms of artwork at Maison de l’Unesco for his show: There were woven baskets in some (by Joe Hogan, a finalist for this year's Loewe Craft Prize and one of its past winners), ceramics in others (by Ryoji Koie) and, in the room where I was seated, giant whirring brushes of the kind that you might otherwise find at a car wash (by Lara Favoretto) — after the show, security guards gleefully posed alongside them. And at Vivienne Westwood, Andreas Kronthaler went full circus. He worked with Bernhard Willhelm, who art directed the show; there were musclemen riding scooters and models riding skateboards and, as a centerpiece, an enormous paper sculpture by the London-based set designer Gary Card, who spent the show in the middle of it all, fixing and remolding it with a team of assistants wielding bottles of flame retardant. The cumulative effect — and how often can you say this at a fashion show — was a good time had by all. — MATTHEW SCHNEIER, deputy fashion critic and reporter, Styles
Instead focus on a name that is fun, unique, and memorable. Opt for a series of 2-4 words that are easy to remember, and not too tricky to spell. You could include your name, or a series of words that sound good together. Consider sneaking words such as fashion or style into the name—but don’t force it. One of our favorite examples of a quirky and memorable blog name is Cupcakes and Cashmere, a blog dedicated to all things food and fashion.
About Blog Welcome to StyleMeSamira, a visual diary created to share a daily dose of my life, style, & everything in between! I wanted a place where I could offer my knowledge & ability to show women that they don’t have to be a size 2 to be chic. Learning what works best for your body type & of course how to wear it more than once. Being Fashionable is just as much about confidence as it is about style.
Just like your posts on trending topics, the best pitch to a media outlet is a story that relates to something that’s currently hot in the news or that’s coming up around the corner. (For example: Pitch a local morning show on presenting fall fashion trends from stores all found in your city.) You’ll also want to show your credibility by linking to past guest posts, media mentions, or accomplishments, as well as why you’re the perfect expert for the story. No, it’s not easy, and it does take time, but as you build your blog and following, it’ll become easier to pitch yourself.
A sale should never be a cue to buy something. I mean, not never, but it should not always be (which is the case for most of us). If you have been waiting for a particular product to go on sale, sure, pick it up, but if it’s a random dress you want just because it is on discount, ask yourself if you’d buy it if it wasn’t on sale. You have your answer.
Women’s fashion week, men’s fashion week — for a few shows, it was everybody’s fashion week, an acknowledgment that the orthodoxies surrounding gender are, at least in certain corners of the world, eroding as we speak. At Maison Margiela, there were bows on boys and suits on girls, and videos of models proclaiming that breaking rules was “My Mutiny.” (It turned out that Mutiny is the name of Margiela’s new fragrance, and that social movements are as co-optable for profit as anything else. Buyer beware.) But there was a genuine sense of play at upstart shows like Luar and Vaquera in New York and the newly rebranded Courrèges in Paris, a refreshing agnosticism about who could (and would) wear what. Who wears the pants? We does! — M.S.

Ready-To-Wear Ensembles: Have ready-to-wear ensembles hanging in your closet (yes, even the shoes and if you're really keen, the accessories too). They will come in handy when you either have absolutely nothing to wear or when you're in a rush to pull an outfit together. It's better to have a few for different occasions -- one corporate, one casual and one glamourous look. You can thank us for this tip later.
Every show season has its must-have handbag and Spring/Summer ’18/’19 is certainly no exception to this rule. However, unlike previous seasons, the latest “It” bag isn’t defined by its shape. Instead, its size is what sets it apart from the rest. Shrunk down to fit no more than a phone and lipstick (if you’re lucky), this season’s most lust-worthy bag is also its smallest. So, if you value style over function, be sure to invest in a miniature version of your favourite handbag. As a bonus, you definitely won’t have a sore shoulder from toting around this style all day.
Other commercially successful independent fashion blogs include Budget Fashionista, which reportedly brings in $600,000 a year in revenue[23] and The Bag Snob, which "generates a six-figure income, mainly from advertising". By 2008 SheFinds.com was generating $400,000 in revenue per year.[24] Personal style bloggers like Aimee Song from SongofStyle.com has told WWD that she gets paid anywhere from a couple thousand to 50,000 dollars for hosting an event or Instagramming a brand.[25]
Instead focus on a name that is fun, unique, and memorable. Opt for a series of 2-4 words that are easy to remember, and not too tricky to spell. You could include your name, or a series of words that sound good together. Consider sneaking words such as fashion or style into the name—but don’t force it. One of our favorite examples of a quirky and memorable blog name is Cupcakes and Cashmere, a blog dedicated to all things food and fashion.
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