Why: While Lesego doesn’t have a blog per se, she does have a very active Instagram full of gorgeous photography and thoughtful captions (she occasionally dabbles in vlogging too). Be it the latest fashion trends, amazing lingerie or even those tricky to style narrow sunglasses, she’s a deft hand at styling and out to destroy any preconceptions of what a curvy girl can and can’t wear.
WHAT YOU CAN DO TODAY: Go to a store that you would consider out of your budget. A place that might even be uncomfortably expensive for you. You don’t have to buy anything. Just walk around, touch the clothes. Maybe even try something on. Make mental note of how things fit, feel, and how you feel wearing it. Then go to a fast fashion shop like Zara or H&M and try similar items on. Make note of what’s different and what’s similar. Anything surprising?
The New York Times "Style" section writer, Eric Wilson, did an extensive study on the impact of fashion bloggers on the fashion industry for one of his style columns. Wilson wrote that these bloggers have ascended ‘from the nosebleed seats to the front row’ in the past year and that the divide between the ‘high code’ editors with a professional opinion and the ‘amateur’ fashion bloggers is beginning to disintegrate. Wilson interviewed prominent publicists, editors and designers. Publicist Kelly Cutrone stated that over the past two years, there has been a complete change in who is writing about fashion. Not only does Cutrone say she needs to keep a watch on the editors of mainstream writings, such as Vogue and Elle, but now she needs to monitor on the millions of fashion bloggers around the world. Cutrone goes on the later state that once these bloggers post anything on the internet, it never comes off, and it now becomes the first thing that the designers will see.[5]
The fact of something is called cashmere shouldn’t mean much, so the first step towards a long and happy life of an item made out of cashmere is purchasing a quality item. This material can be processed in many different ways, so you could easily end up with an overpaid poor quality sweater. However, there are some indicators that can show you what are you looking at. First, you should be looking for thick knitted garments, and second, try stretching it – if it pulls back, it’s a good type of cashmere. Chances are, you’ll pay good money for any quality cashmere item, so you should take care of it, which means washing it in cold water by hand.

I don't actually think these events really happened to me, but they'll still come to mind when I think back on a time when a secondhand event seemed to hold some kind of truth that reality did not. Example: I felt all weird and drifty at the beginning of last summer, and when I try and revisit that place, I don't literally imagine the view from behind a car windshield and how everything must look to the narrator in Yo La Tengo's "Today Is the Day," but I sure remember the exact sadness that it captured.


I like how you said that business women should invest in quality, staple pieces for their outfits. I think that it’s so important, especially in the workplace, to make a good impression on your clients and your managers. My friend just started a business, and is trying to figure out in which types of outfits she ought to invest. I’ll have to recommend that she find a women’s clothing retailer in her area that can offer quality, staple pieces for her to look and feel confident in the workplace.
Vancouver, Canada–based blogger Vanessa Hong manages not only her wildly successful blog, The Haute Pursuit, but also her accompanying fashion line, THP Shop, which is beloved by editors and street style stars alike. She's also a mainstay at every fashion week and a street style star in her own right—photographers love shooting her uniquely edgy, contemporary style.

I'm not saying that you have to be perfect all the time. It's absolutely fine to make mistakes, because it's sometimes the only way for you to learn and improve your style. I encourage you to get to know yourself better, simply by exposing yourself to new styles and clothes. Experimenting and having fun with fashion is the key to evolving your style.
A blog is a great way to share your personal style, as well as your take on the latest trends from established designers.  A blog that delivers quality content can be a great way to gain recognition as a fashion expert.  While only a few bloggers are seen as true fashion icons, many lesser-known fashion blogs have gained quite a bit of mainstream attention recently, effectively launching the fashion careers of the bloggers behind them.
Gray checked blazers took over the street style scene and our Instagram feeds this past season, but the trend is just getting started. Flourishing into full-on plaid, the print was everywhere from the runways to the street style set outside the shows. From colorful coats to menswear-inspired blazers to unexpected plaid accessories, there are endless ways to weave the trend into your wardrobe this year.
“I wish people understood that in fashion less is more.  For example, if you are wearing an off-the-shoulder top, make that your focal point. You don’t need anything else. Huge earrings or a statement necklace will be overwhelming—the top is sexy chic as is!” —Jennifer Berger, stylist and president of Wear it Well   These fashion mistakes are making you look older.

“Start small,” is Marilyn’s advice for adding a pop of color to your everyday looks. She suggests adding a neck scarf or a colorful pair of shoes to start and then building your way up to a totally color-filled wardrobe. She also thinks red is a great starting point. “Red is really so timeless; it’s bright and bold and goes with everything. It’s such a strong and empowering color,” she noted.
About - A Denver girl, born and raised - I love sharing my knowledge of our adorable city with a passion for style and connecting people. I started Denver Darling as a fun way to share my experiences with fashion, food, and fun with friends. I live in the Lohi neighborhood of Denver with my husband, Jonny, and our golden retriever Downtown Charlie Brown.

The New York Times "Style" section writer, Eric Wilson, did an extensive study on the impact of fashion bloggers on the fashion industry for one of his style columns. Wilson wrote that these bloggers have ascended ‘from the nosebleed seats to the front row’ in the past year and that the divide between the ‘high code’ editors with a professional opinion and the ‘amateur’ fashion bloggers is beginning to disintegrate. Wilson interviewed prominent publicists, editors and designers. Publicist Kelly Cutrone stated that over the past two years, there has been a complete change in who is writing about fashion. Not only does Cutrone say she needs to keep a watch on the editors of mainstream writings, such as Vogue and Elle, but now she needs to monitor on the millions of fashion bloggers around the world. Cutrone goes on the later state that once these bloggers post anything on the internet, it never comes off, and it now becomes the first thing that the designers will see.[5]
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"Reflecting and archiving is not the same as dwelling in the past. It is not anti-living, but a part of life, even a crucial one. We do this to highlight one thing above others, so that a special moment can take up more space in our brains than an inconsequential one; so that, by plain math, our personal worlds contain more good things and fewer bad ones. Or more interesting things and fewer blah ones, since you have to record the bad, too."

About Blog Fashion Talks, produced in partnership with CAFA, is a podcast that observes the world through the lens of fashion. Join host Donna Bishop as she interviews designers, stylists, industry insiders and even those outside fashion to reveal insights, observations, personal stories and historical moments on how fashion helps to shape the world we live in and how our world shapes fashion and the clothes we wear.
“Fashion shows are for transporting people,” Balenciaga designer Demna Gvasalia told Vogue this season, “otherwise there’s no point.” His show was one of the season’s most surreal transports. He compared working on a collection presentation to working on a movie, and in fact, it was Luc Besson’s studio on the outskirts of Paris where he held his show, in a digital tunnel that dripped, melted and swooped through a simulated reality. It was the work of the digital artist Jon Rafman, whom Gvasalia had met at Art Basel, and the effect was practically mind-melting, a digi-dystopia for an elegant but surreal collection.
About Blog I'm Brittany Xavier and I began my personal style blog. My style is versatile, casual, comfortable and a bit edgy. My blog first started out as only fashion but over the last three years so much of it really includes the lifestyle aspect of my everyday life. A blog to highlight my affordable finds as well as brands I find worth the splurge, those investment pieces I'll wear again and again.
"Well, really, our memories are all we have, and even those we think of as "real" are made up. Art can condense experience into something greater than reality, and it can also give us permission to do or think certain things that otherwise we’ve avoided or felt ashamed of. The imagination is where reality lives; it’s the instant lie of backwash from the prow of that boat that we think of as cutting the present moment, everything following it becoming less and less "factual" but no less real than what we think of as having actually occurred." 
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