Today I am 20. The Crucible, in which I play Mary Warren, opened at the Walter Kerr Theatre three weeks ago, March 31st—also the eight-year anniversary of this blog. I have a lot of trouble comprehending that writing Style Rookie led to writing for other places, then starting Rookie, then being able to audition for plays that I love and to be inside of them for long periods of time, which is an inexplicably wonderful way to live a life. But I am really really really insanely thankful for all of it, and many of you have followed for a LONG time, and that means a lot. Right now, I'm very slowly writing something that I hope will effectively articulate the strangeness of the way these all overlap—the fictions we get to try on via diary/blog-keeping, and acting, and personal style. But that's a longterm hermit project. I just wanted to mention it because in my attempt to briefly list recent stuff I've been up to, I may sound callous, but: None of this goes unexamined or unappreciated.
In the constantly growing landscape of fashion bloggers, it's an unfortunate fact that the younger crowd significantly outnumbers ladies of a certain age. It seems everywhere you look, it's nothing but beautiful 20-somethings showing off their style, and while there are certainly more of them, that doesn't make them any more relevant or valuable than their more mature counterparts. Fashion is universal, after all.
Whether you're tall or curvy, petite, boyish or blessed with curves — dressing in a way that flatters your specific body will always make you feel more confident and beautiful. Taller women can get away with longer hemlines, while more petite women will want to avoid being swallowed up by what they wear. Hourglass figures should embrace figure-hugging dresses and so on.
I don't actually think these events really happened to me, but they'll still come to mind when I think back on a time when a secondhand event seemed to hold some kind of truth that reality did not. Example: I felt all weird and drifty at the beginning of last summer, and when I try and revisit that place, I don't literally imagine the view from behind a car windshield and how everything must look to the narrator in Yo La Tengo's "Today Is the Day," but I sure remember the exact sadness that it captured.

Once you’ve gained a solid following, you can start reaching out to clothing brands. This is the fun part! The first step is to create a list of PR or word of mouth marketing agencies that represent the brands you love and ask to be added to their media list. (Try Googling the brand name you’re after and the phrase “PR firm.” It’s likely a press release will pop up, giving you the contact information you need.) It’s also helpful to keep tabs on the industry by reading sites such as PRSA.org, FashionablyMarketing.Me, and PR Couture.

“One of the most important things that people need to realize is that just because they buy something in their ‘size,’ doesn’t mean that it’s going to fit them. People get very invested in being a certain size but this is a huge mistake as different designers cut for different body types and also, many companies ‘play with size’ in order to flatter customers. Buy what fits, regardless of the number on the tag.” —Michael O’Connor, personal stylist


From the beginning, start promoting your blog to family, friends, and your social network (without being overly annoying, of course). This is your best bet for testing out your brand and content. The truth is, no one will read your first couple posts outside of the people you tell about your blog, so there's no reason to freak out every time you hit the publish button. Just get some content out there and start getting honest feedback from people.
How to actually do it: "Don't give people too many things to look at all at once," says Halbreich. "If you're wearing a low-cut dress, focus on the cleavage—you don't also need bare arms and legs." The concept applies to fit as well: A body-hugging dress is better with a more sensible neckline and hem, whereas a skirt that hits a few inches above the knee won't raise eyebrows if it's flared rather than tight.

It’s official: I’m wearing things that are a decade old. I’ve had both this ivory coat and camel sweater for a whopping 10 years. (Whoa!) I was inspired to wear them together by the colors on this plaid scarf, which I have quite the affinity for - check out 6 ways I’ve worn it, below. Lots of old things on the blog today but a new way to wear them together!
A handbag is one of the most versatile and important accessories that a woman can own. There’s no such thing as “one too many” when it comes to bags and purses, but pay attention to what type is the best for you. Sure, you’ll need different ones for different occasions,so your should at least have three different kinds for starters – small, medium and large. From styles traditionally considered masculine to typical high end women’s handbags, there is nothing you can’t combine with the right clothes depending on the occasion. After that, you should concentrate on the type you use the most, which is also the type which will get worn out the fastest. That is why you should have more of them – if you switch them regularly, they will last longer.

The title of Patti Gibbons's blog, Not Dead Yet, really says it all. She might be a woman in her 60s, but she's not dead yet—and she certainly doesn't dress as such. With a penchant for power prints and a commitment to wearing exactly what she feels like wearing, Gibbons has our stamp of approval (as well as that of outlets like The Huffington Post).
From the beginning, start promoting your blog to family, friends, and your social network (without being overly annoying, of course). This is your best bet for testing out your brand and content. The truth is, no one will read your first couple posts outside of the people you tell about your blog, so there's no reason to freak out every time you hit the publish button. Just get some content out there and start getting honest feedback from people.
We’d all appreciate it if the days were a bit longer, but regarding the fact that’s not about to happen, you should use all kind of trick and tips in order to dress up quickly. A nice touch is always a bow tie – you can make it work with almost anything. If you don’t have any heels near buy, you could class up your flats by placing clip on earrings on them.
Accessorizing is what actually gives an outfit a personal touch. The way you accessorize is an important part of your style. Most of garments in your color are probably (and should be) in neutral colors, so you can combine them when you find it suitable. So, when you’re purchasing accessories, you should be free to get them in wild colors. Also, don’t be afraid to clash together different materials, like edgy chains with pears and feathers, perhaps. An interesting addition to accessorizing somehow everyone tends to forget are buttons – try switching a set from your garment with the one you choose. It doesn’t require any special sewing skills, and it fits any kind of budget. You should know that accessorizing rounds out an outfit, so try to find time to put on a couple of items.

Just like your posts on trending topics, the best pitch to a media outlet is a story that relates to something that’s currently hot in the news or that’s coming up around the corner. (For example: Pitch a local morning show on presenting fall fashion trends from stores all found in your city.) You’ll also want to show your credibility by linking to past guest posts, media mentions, or accomplishments, as well as why you’re the perfect expert for the story. No, it’s not easy, and it does take time, but as you build your blog and following, it’ll become easier to pitch yourself.
It’s Friday night and you’re searching through your wardrobe to put together the right outfit, but you just can’t seem to find anything that matches. Sound familiar? This is the kind of struggle all women have, but things don’t have to be too complicated. You can make your life a lot easier with some clever fashion tips that allow you look your best in any occasions. You can adjust your choices based on your personal style, body type and personality, but most of these tips will work for any of woman out there.
You might accurately describe Alyson Walsh as the Alexa Chung of her generation: She prefers wearing a good pair of jeans and a T-shirt over anything too fussy. She writes that she started her blog, That's Not My Age, with one mission: "I've always strongly believed that you don't have to have youth to have style, and I wanted to share ideas and celebrate inspirational women (and men) of all ages."
Designers went big on all things animalia. For fall, we saw heavy coats and structured jackets in leopard spots and zebra stripes, but for spring, it is all in the unique animal-print details. We loved JW Anderson’s puff leopard-print sleeves and Richard Quinn’s excessive over-the-top take on spots, while Burberry’s mix of zebra on the top and spots on the bottom felt fun and fresh.
I don't actually think these events really happened to me, but they'll still come to mind when I think back on a time when a secondhand event seemed to hold some kind of truth that reality did not. Example: I felt all weird and drifty at the beginning of last summer, and when I try and revisit that place, I don't literally imagine the view from behind a car windshield and how everything must look to the narrator in Yo La Tengo's "Today Is the Day," but I sure remember the exact sadness that it captured.
Wow, Ramsay, thank you again. This is massive! I always have my domain for 5 years and I just parked it. And because I have always pushed back on making it big, I never really paid for webhosting. It has always been with blogspot (I know!) Reading this makes me realize I had 5 years trying to find my voice as a blogger, 5 years of finding that voice and 5 years of, well, maybe wasting my time when I could’ve done a lot better. So thank you, this is like a wake up call.
Fashion’s enduring obsession with the 1980s isn’t going anywhere. From Hedi Slimane’s controversial debut at Celine (all puffball off-the-shoulder minidresses and big-shouldered blazers) to the tie-dye T-shirts, stonewashed denim and shell suits at Stella McCartney — not to mention the oversize sweaters and Madonna crosses on show at Marco de Vincenzo — nostalgia for the era appears to have reached critical mass. Much like now, the ’80s were a polarizing decade both politically and culturally. It is not surprising, then, that these tribute fashions also still split the jury. — E.P. 

“Trust your gut, because sometimes friends give you the worst advice. If you don’t think your friend has the exact same style as you do, don’t shop with them,” warned Jennifer Fisher. The jeweler to the stars can usually be found shopping alone—both in stores or online—so she can clearly focus on what really works with her wardrobe and what she actually wants to buy.
Fashion blogs first appeared in the blogosphere prior to 2002,[16] and Kathryn Finney, founder of Budget Fashionista, was invited to New York Fashion Week as early as September 2003;[14] a short time later, Fashiontribes.com was being seated fourth row at shows like Bill Blass. Paris-based American fashion blogger Diane Pernet, founder of A Shaded View on Fashion[18], has been called "the original style blogger[19]" by The New York Times, and has been a fashion blogger since 2005[20].
I don't actually think these events really happened to me, but they'll still come to mind when I think back on a time when a secondhand event seemed to hold some kind of truth that reality did not. Example: I felt all weird and drifty at the beginning of last summer, and when I try and revisit that place, I don't literally imagine the view from behind a car windshield and how everything must look to the narrator in Yo La Tengo's "Today Is the Day," but I sure remember the exact sadness that it captured.
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