“Sure everyone’s style should be dress to be true to themselves and not look like someone else but fashion insiders know that style is a journey not a destination. One way to fast-track that is to identify style icons that speak to you. Look for what aspects of their style specifically you relate to. Pinterest boards can be a great help. From there put your style into words, to help guide you through the exploration to develop your style.” —Mr. Jones

“Trust your gut, because sometimes friends give you the worst advice. If you don’t think your friend has the exact same style as you do, don’t shop with them,” warned Jennifer Fisher. The jeweler to the stars can usually be found shopping alone—both in stores or online—so she can clearly focus on what really works with her wardrobe and what she actually wants to buy.
“For men and women, jewelry is the defining path for creating your own look and vibe. Research designers that are new and untapped (they exist in just about every city these days), and with Etsy and the internet, you have really no excuses. And don’t forget the supportive accessories. I don’t just mean investing in a nice watch and handbag. Ditch the old umbrella and cheap shades and upgrade already!” —Mr. Russell
On the flip side, this option is “free”, but is going to take more time on your end. Before you reach out to an expert for advice, make sure you do your homework. Experts are often busy people. Make sure you search if they answered the questions you want to ask before. Skim through their blogs, Twitter, check if they’ve been interviewed on a podcast or magazine. If you can’t find the answer you’re looking for, only then should you consider reaching out to them. For that, I highly recommend reading this post: “How to get the attention of your favorite expert”
The versions about the origin of casual style are diverse, too. According to one, it originated in a small Scottish town Aberdeen, particularly in a football club, where everyone wore his/her name on the clothes. The fans of football and the founders of this club wanted to be different from the others and they created a unique football style, characterized by the pieces of certain brands. Further, the football fans realized that the brands were not at all important. And they started concentrating on the comfort and the harmony of the pieces that were combined and the casual style was born. According to another version, the native Scandinavian people of the countryside used this style for their combinations.
Then, take your sharing and relationship-building to the next level. Start reaching out to other bloggers and potential readers via Twitter. You’ll be surprised by how many great relationships you can build just by a simple tweet! You should also consider setting up informational interviews with bloggers you admire—it’s a great way to start building your network .(Need help finding bloggers and more readers? Check out my site, Canopi.me, where you can find and follow bloggers who share your interests, all in one place. Request an invite so you’ll have first access once we officially launch.) 

Fashion’s most unflattering women’s wear trend is far from a spot in our rearview mirrors. Skintight bike shorts pedaled their way onto scores of runways once again this season, having first emerged as a ’90s throwback reference at Off-White this time last year. At Fendi, in a look sported by Bella Hadid, they were long, navy and spandex, with shimmering streaks and a matching leather waist belt. At Roberto Cavalli, Paul Surridge presented a pair for after dark, in ochre with blue sequined embroidery. Over in Paris, the first look from the new creative director at Mugler, Casey Cadwallader, was an oversize, seamed black blazer and — you guessed it — matching biking shorts. And Jacquemus opted for an unforgiving knitted tangerine variation, to be worn with an oversize white shirt and the swagger of someone comfortable with having everything on show. Saddle up! — ELIZABETH PATON, European correspondent, Styles
Know Your Colours: Know which colours will flatter you the most by figuring out if the undertones in your skin are either warm or cold. The experts at The Fashion Spot say women with cool undertones look best in white, black, gray, silver, and shades of blue. Women with warm undertones will be dazzling in shades of yellow, gold, brown, green and red. Source: The Fashion Spot
How to actually do it: "Figure out your go-to, foolproof looks," says designer Nanette Lepore, then seek out variations on that theme. Stumped? Picture the outfits that you feel most comfortable in. Or ask people close to you what you look best in. Once you've zeroed in on what works, find different takes. "I gravitate toward jackets, so I'll do a bomber style, then a silk version, or a denim jacket with leather sleeves," says Minkoff. "Whenever you feel the need to talk yourself into things, that's a red flag that you shouldn't buy them," says Minkoff. If you have doubts in the dressing room, it may help to take a photo of yourself in the item, suggests Aerin Lauder, the founder and creative director of the lifestyle brand Aerin. "It's much more accurate than looking in the mirror."
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