A blog is a great way to share your personal style, as well as your take on the latest trends from established designers.  A blog that delivers quality content can be a great way to gain recognition as a fashion expert.  While only a few bloggers are seen as true fashion icons, many lesser-known fashion blogs have gained quite a bit of mainstream attention recently, effectively launching the fashion careers of the bloggers behind them.
When it’s really, really cold outside, sometimes even the items in your wardrobe that you always depend on (everything from ripped jeans to cashmere sweaters) no longer cut it. This is when you have to find creative ways to layer under your clothes that no one will notice. You can, for instance, throw a pair of tights or sheer stockings under a pair of ripped jeans or layer a form-fitting sweater over a long-sleeve T-shirt. Also don’t be afraid to whip out the long johns you normally reserve for ski trips—sometimes during the winter they’ll come in just as handy for the walk to work.
About - I started this blog because I love clothes – thats obvious, right? I think that clothes and fashion are the best way to express yourself. An outfit says a lot more about a person than you’d think. I love sharing my daily outfits & makeup with all of you! I love to shop and I may or may not have a shopping problem (yikes!) but I figured I could at least turn that into something positive – by sharing my favorite fashion items with you!
The blogosphere has indeed opened up many doors for the fashion industry, one of which is allowing the ordinary people to partake in the 'elite' fashion world and discuss their likes and dislikes on the way fashion is presented in the media.[6] In 2008, the Pulitzer Prize winning fashion writer and former blogger Robin Givhan, claimed that fashion blogs had democratized the fashion industry. Givhan had also written in Harpers Bazaar that 'The rise of the fashion blogger has evolved [fashion] from an aristocratic business dominated by omnipotent designers into a democratic one in which everyone has access to stylistic clothes...the average people, too often estranged from fashion, is not taking ownership of it'.[7] A similar statement was said by Constance White, the style director for E-bay and former fashion journalist, saying that the impact of the fashion blogosphere has allowed the whole population to take ownership of the fashion world, including people of all different races, genders, and social standings.[8] The Daily Mail writer Karen Kay suggested once in an interview that blogs allow anyone to both critique and praise designers, regardless of the often ‘needed’ professional opinion, with the help fashion blogs, the consumers are helping to set the trends.[9]
Dress For Women, Not For Men:The Man Repeller once told us that if women dressed for men, we'd all be wearing bodycon miniskirts and dresses. This is why we have to dress with other women in mind. It actually makes getting dressed easier when you're dressing for style, not for sex, and your confidence will shine through because you'll be more comfortable in what you're wearing.
You cannot move forward if you choose to look backward. My Uncle Joe, who was an Ojibwa, married to my cousin, often said as long as the chiefs can keep my people hostage on reserves they'll never amount to anything. Joe was a wise man, wiser than all the politicians and and self serving chiefs, because one day the younger generation will leave the reserves and become full participants in society, hopefully enjoying equal benefits as well as equal responsibility.
Why: The leggy blonde provides a tres chic mix of outfit inspiration – her personal style definitely has that insouciant French vibe – and trend and brand lowdowns. The ‘boutique’ section of her site is a one-stop shop for the pieces she loves – and we also like the fact she has regular wardrobe clearouts via Vestiaire so true Camille-alikes can snap up her actual clothes…
Neely, 31, launched Fashion Toast in 2007. Her particular style of blogging -- photo-heavy posts featuring cool clothes and model poses -- has greatly influenced the generation of influencers who have followed her. While Neely has collaborated with established brands in the past, she recently launched her own line. Are You Am I, a collection of slip dresses, tap pants and distinctly cut tees, is notable for its specificity. For fans who want to emulate Neely's style -- and there are plenty of them -- there is nothing more perfect. 
On the flip side, this option is “free”, but is going to take more time on your end. Before you reach out to an expert for advice, make sure you do your homework. Experts are often busy people. Make sure you search if they answered the questions you want to ask before. Skim through their blogs, Twitter, check if they’ve been interviewed on a podcast or magazine. If you can’t find the answer you’re looking for, only then should you consider reaching out to them. For that, I highly recommend reading this post: “How to get the attention of your favorite expert”
Devoting this much time to your closet is unnecessary if you don’t take care of all those clothes you’ve carefully chosen. One quality iron, a nice detergent and a couple of seconds you should devote to checking the instructions on a garment is all it takes, so don’t be lazy. There is something for everyone on this list, and the truth of the matter is that mastering some fashion basics will allow you to develop and polish up a unique style that suits you very well and let’s you stand out, but has a universally aesthetic quality to it at the same time. 

How to actually do it: First, a disclaimer. There's no need to break the bank on the basics—tees, button-downs, jeans—of which there are plenty of quality options available at low prices. Instead, splurge (if you can) on the types of items in which even the cheapo versions aren't exactly steals. For instance, bargain cashmere will still set you back $100. But that sweater will stretch out quickly, and then you'll have to blow another $100 to replace it, rather than spending a little more only once. "When buying classics, like a great black blazer, it's important to invest in better fabrics— say, wool—that will hold up better over time," says Minkoff. Try calculating the price per wear to help stave off sticker shock.
Lyn Slater has earned herself plenty of accolades and press (including from us at Who What Wear) for her vivacious spirit and similarly poised sense of style. Her blog, Accidental Icon, is aptly titled: Slater had a successful career as a university professor before she embarked on her blog, which started as a fun hobby and launched her into the sartorial stratosphere. 

These memories worsen with time. The original events often occur in adolescence, are usually social interactions, and, at worst, were intended to be romantic. One remedy is to frequently remind yourself that you won't have to live with your humiliation forever because MORTALITY. Or that our perception of reality is pretty inaccurate no matter what (see: Chris Ware; the tiny stoner I quoted earlier). Or that technically — TECHNICALLY — we have no way of knowing for sure that any of this is happening AT ALL. You could also just watch Freaks and Geeks.
Donate Clothes You'll Never Wear: Stop hoarding. If you haven't worn it recently, then you probably never will. To help decide if you should toss it or not, the experts at Apartment Therapy suggest you answer the following questions: Do you like cut, fabric and colour? Are you comfortable wearing it? Does it fit you now (no, not if you lose 3 inches off your waist in the next month)? Can any damages like stains or holes be fixed? Do you have more than one place to wear it? Can it be combined with other articles of clothing in your closet? When was the last time you wore it (if it's been over a year, nix it)? Source: Apartment Therapy
“Does this accentuate the best version of who I am as a woman?” Brother Vellies designer Aurora James asks this, before buying a vibrant animal-print coat or an over-the-top dress. “For me, I love things that have a ‘wow factor,’ so if I’m going to splurge and buy something, I want it to be the clothing version of myself,” James explains. It’s a brilliant trick for making sure that your purchase is something you’ll actually wear; if you feel like yourself in a piece of clothing, you’re more likely to gravitate towards it when it’s hanging in your closet.
Hope you had a wonderful Thanksgiving! Loved connecting with many of you on social about some of the best holiday sales and promotions over the weekend. I’m excited to share another awesome find today - this bird print skirt which is on final clearance. (Only two sizes left - eek!) I couldn’t resist a print that is a prime opportunity to pair red and pink together, and the fact that it’s a bird print? Icing on the cake!
Know Your Colours: Know which colours will flatter you the most by figuring out if the undertones in your skin are either warm or cold. The experts at The Fashion Spot say women with cool undertones look best in white, black, gray, silver, and shades of blue. Women with warm undertones will be dazzling in shades of yellow, gold, brown, green and red. Source: The Fashion Spot
For the 2016 Pirelli Calendar, Annie Leibovitz chose to photograph women whose achievements demonstrate a different kind of beauty from what the calendar has traditionally showcased. I'm still shocked to be included among so many people who've long influenced not just my work, but how I see the world, and try to see myself. Annie photographed me one year earlier in the pink velvet dress I'd originally bought for prom, in my parents' backyard. At that time, it was still my backyard, too, and had functioned since I was a little kid as a personal photo studio, study, and consistent reminder that I was bigger than I had been the year before, and the year before that, and that this would only keep happening. (I'm still v short, but: relatively speaking.) It was where I learned that as your childhood shrinks around you, so will your sense of wonder, unless you choose to pay close attention to what surrounds you at new heights. When Annie shot me for Pirelli, we were just a few blocks from my new home in NYC. A lot happens in that first year, and not knowing the geography of the city makes every encounter feel totally isolated from the rest of the world, like a castle on a cloud. At the time of this shoot, I was parsing what in this year had seemed significant just because it was new, and then what was enriching. I was exhausted by the sheen, and desperate to develop a kind of discernment which would make me so healthy, so OK with myself, that genuine wonder would return--gravitation towards stuff that isn't just shiny, but illuminates the same sorts of truths I'd learned as a fan of Patti, Yoko, and other women who happen to be in this calendar, too. I decided to cut my hair on the shoot, rid myself of any excess. Annie made me feel completely comfortable, like I was the same person as the year before, but indeed older. Again, still very physically short. My foot is peeking out of that shoe. I urge you to look at the other portraits, all so stunning, bold & nearly impossible to turn away from. They are strongest as a group, but I wanted to share what mine means to me and thank you for following what I do in such a way that has allowed for this to happen.

The New York Times "Style" section writer, Eric Wilson, did an extensive study on the impact of fashion bloggers on the fashion industry for one of his style columns. Wilson wrote that these bloggers have ascended ‘from the nosebleed seats to the front row’ in the past year and that the divide between the ‘high code’ editors with a professional opinion and the ‘amateur’ fashion bloggers is beginning to disintegrate. Wilson interviewed prominent publicists, editors and designers. Publicist Kelly Cutrone stated that over the past two years, there has been a complete change in who is writing about fashion. Not only does Cutrone say she needs to keep a watch on the editors of mainstream writings, such as Vogue and Elle, but now she needs to monitor on the millions of fashion bloggers around the world. Cutrone goes on the later state that once these bloggers post anything on the internet, it never comes off, and it now becomes the first thing that the designers will see.[5]
“If you have an hourglass body type, look for styles and fabrics that reduce bulk and showcase your waist. Tailored pieces and stretchy fabrics that hug and accentuate your frame will bring out the natural lines of your hourglass shape. Look for blended knit fabrics and slimming neckline styles such as v-necks and scoop necks. A simple wrap dress is the one go to piece a woman with an hourglass frame should have in her closet.” —Kristina Michniak, stylist and global apparel manager for Spreadshirt    Here’s how to dress to look ten pounds thinner.
This was GREAT content and really helpful. I had already instinctually gone towards a few of the set up things, and the good content idea. Thank you for validating that long posts with good content are good things- I have had many people coach me in the opposite direction. My posts have a lot of content and are long, so I’m glad to hear that I’m not breaking every rule in the book. Thanks for the networking ideas, I had not seen these before.
The New York-based Eadie, 29, is best known for her accessible, yet educated, approach to fashion. Based in San Francisco when she launched the blog, Eadie has worked as a merchandiser for brands like Gap and Tory Burch, which means she has a professional edge when it comes to outfit posts. And brands like love working with her because she has a reputation for converting readers into shoppers. 
I develop my own form of sacred geometry to find the secret knots among these details and fit them into the rest of my journal. I go through one every two months or so, and for that period of time, coordinate it and all other parts of my life with a specific mood. My handwriting, my doodles, the clothes I wear, the books I read, the music I listen to, the movies I watch, and the streets I walk down all match up. One goal of this is to create memories that are aesthetically pleasing and cohesive and perfect and synesthetic, each element in place (and never repeated in another journal or memory, making its singular usage especially special) so that the nostalgia will feel extra good. The other is to be as many people as possible, until I'm nobody at all.

Everything is now a matter of life and death. Math homework: NOT A PRIORITY WHEN THE END COULD BE RIGHT AROUND THE CORNER. Cleaning my room: IS THIS REALLY HOW I WANT TO SPEND MY LAST HOURS ON EARTH WHEN I COULD GET HIT BY A CAR TOMORROW? Etc. The habit that blog-keeping instilled in me of compulsively archiving every single thing only worsens. If I get behind in my journal, I spend hours wondering where to even start. I can't pay attention in class, only make scattered notes where there should be a timeline of the Industrial Revolution, listing all the details I need to get down properly as soon as I have time: The music we listened to in Claire's room, the old man I saw on my way to school, the view from my boyfriend's car when we sat in a 7-Eleven parking lot watching people walk in and trying to predict their purchases, along with a record of what each person looked like and what they bought. My hands tremble, relaxing only once everything has been sufficiently documented, each memory in my grasp, as if by putting them down on paper, I can make them last forever.

The spring collections always encourage designers to wax bohemian — a flower here, a fringe there. But what seemed different this season was where, and how frequently, these ideas appeared. Chloé and Paco Rabanne in Paris were leaders of the pack, each constructing garments from layers of contrasting floral prints that evoked exotic gardens. Patchwork and fringe were reimagined too, as was the case at Altuzarra, where seashell-embellished net sheaths topped knit dresses. Finally, at Etro, flowing paisley dresses were worn with vibrantly patterned wool blankets. — M.J.G.
Ready-To-Wear Ensembles: Have ready-to-wear ensembles hanging in your closet (yes, even the shoes and if you're really keen, the accessories too). They will come in handy when you either have absolutely nothing to wear or when you're in a rush to pull an outfit together. It's better to have a few for different occasions -- one corporate, one casual and one glamourous look. You can thank us for this tip later.
The fact of something is called cashmere shouldn’t mean much, so the first step towards a long and happy life of an item made out of cashmere is purchasing a quality item. This material can be processed in many different ways, so you could easily end up with an overpaid poor quality sweater. However, there are some indicators that can show you what are you looking at. First, you should be looking for thick knitted garments, and second, try stretching it – if it pulls back, it’s a good type of cashmere. Chances are, you’ll pay good money for any quality cashmere item, so you should take care of it, which means washing it in cold water by hand.
Your blog should be a reflection of you. It is very important that you blog about something that you really love, and something that you understand well. You have to make an impact and show something unique because there are millions of other fashion blogs that are alike. If you love clothes, write about it and take pictures. If you are only into shoes, focus on what you love (and don’t love) about the footwear industry. But here are a few topics that might help you get to your passion:

On the flip side, this option is “free”, but is going to take more time on your end. Before you reach out to an expert for advice, make sure you do your homework. Experts are often busy people. Make sure you search if they answered the questions you want to ask before. Skim through their blogs, Twitter, check if they’ve been interviewed on a podcast or magazine. If you can’t find the answer you’re looking for, only then should you consider reaching out to them. For that, I highly recommend reading this post: “How to get the attention of your favorite expert”


Fashion is a multibillion-dollar industry that has considerable impact on the way ordinary people dress and present themselves and relies heavily on media and advertising to communicate the producer's preferences and goals and influence public perception through various types of promotion; at the same time, fashion can be influenced by social change and counter-trends outside the producer, retailer or advertiser's control. As fashion is driven by trends within and without the fashion industry, fashion blogs and other "new media" outside the control of traditional establishment represent a disruptive innovation to the social dynamics of mass media and fashion consumption in modern consumer society. It is likely that the blogosphere will have a considerable long-term influence on the industry, as the number of fashion based blogs continue to grow, with increasing numbers of consumers able to create and modify the media that they consume, and traditional producers and advertisers adapting their practices to avoid dilution of their own influence.
Then, take your sharing and relationship-building to the next level. Start reaching out to other bloggers and potential readers via Twitter. You’ll be surprised by how many great relationships you can build just by a simple tweet! You should also consider setting up informational interviews with bloggers you admire—it’s a great way to start building your network .(Need help finding bloggers and more readers? Check out my site, Canopi.me, where you can find and follow bloggers who share your interests, all in one place. Request an invite so you’ll have first access once we officially launch.)
Then, take your sharing and relationship-building to the next level. Start reaching out to other bloggers and potential readers via Twitter. You’ll be surprised by how many great relationships you can build just by a simple tweet! You should also consider setting up informational interviews with bloggers you admire—it’s a great way to start building your network .(Need help finding bloggers and more readers? Check out my site, Canopi.me, where you can find and follow bloggers who share your interests, all in one place. Request an invite so you’ll have first access once we officially launch.)
Designers went big on all things animalia. For fall, we saw heavy coats and structured jackets in leopard spots and zebra stripes, but for spring, it is all in the unique animal-print details. We loved JW Anderson’s puff leopard-print sleeves and Richard Quinn’s excessive over-the-top take on spots, while Burberry’s mix of zebra on the top and spots on the bottom felt fun and fresh.
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