A sloppily cuffed jean. An ill-fitting blazer. A dress that shows just a little too much to be referred to as "tastefully sheer." These are the things that fashion editors and stylists can spot from a million miles away. To those in the biz, the proper proportions of a crop top may be obvious, but for those seeing the trends in a magazine or online, it can be a little trickier to know exactly how to wear everything.
I have been thinking a lot lately about what validates an emotion/event/observation, makes me feel like it really happened and I really lived it, and this seems like the right occasion to word-vomit these ideas. (Plus, I miss having time to keep this thing going, and I do feel an obligation to people who have read my blog for a long time that is not unlike the unspoken understanding you have with your first best friend, the one who watched you like stupid bands and stupid people and embarrass yourself and cry a lot, whose insight into whatever you do from now on is shaped by a unique knowledge of all the ties which bind New You to Old You, and who refrains from bringing up in front of new acquaintances that time you were on the 8th grade hip-hop team in the interest of letting you become more of yourself. In other words, we had a time, but there's so much time ahead, and it is, somehow, at the same time, quickly running out.)
With top-tier fashion bloggers raking in multimillion-dollar campaigns, it’s no wonder every self-proclaimed fashionista wants to launch a personal style site. But not all outfit posts are created equal. These fashion bloggers stand out from the pack thanks to their one-of-a-kind sartorial sense and sharp business acumen. Click through the slideshow above to meet the dynamic women ruling the blogosphere and our picks for the best fashion blogs of 2018. May the best blog win.
With top-tier fashion bloggers raking in multimillion-dollar campaigns, it’s no wonder every self-proclaimed fashionista wants to launch a personal style site. But not all outfit posts are created equal. These fashion bloggers stand out from the pack thanks to their one-of-a-kind sartorial sense and sharp business acumen. Click through the slideshow above to meet the dynamic women ruling the blogosphere and our picks for the best fashion blogs of 2018. May the best blog win.
Continuing in our annual-ish tradition, today we're releasing our 2015 ranking of the most influential personal style bloggers in the world. This list looks wildly different than it did in 2013. Here's why. For one, we excluded every blogger who has expanded her empire to the point that the blog is no longer only about her. (Leandra Medine, Garance Dore and Emily Weiss fall into this category.) We also chose to focus on those who write more about personal style than anything else. (That means leaving out lifestyle and photography bloggers.) We took more international bloggers into consideration, since the Internet is global and all. And we narrowed it down to blogs that cover womenswear more regularly than menswear. 

Sporty surf looks were prevalent throughout the season. Perhaps the most major runway moment was at up-and-coming designer Marine Serre’s show, where she created couturelike looks out of neoprene commonly used for wetsuits. Also picking up on this surf trend was CALVIN KLEIN 205W39NYC, with a scuba-inspired ensemble, and Etro, where the model even toted around a printed surfboard. The surf look was even given a luxe makeover by Hermès, where a neoprene swimsuit was layered under a chic leather skirt.


You check the app first thing after your alarm goes off in the morning, so why not let it influence your outfit for the day. “It shows me how a mix of women are dressing, from designers to stylists to influencers to my friends and which styles they’re actually wearing day to day,” said Taylor. Consider saving inspiring outfits into a “Collection” on your account, so you can easily access outfits you want to emulate.
For the 2016 Pirelli Calendar, Annie Leibovitz chose to photograph women whose achievements demonstrate a different kind of beauty from what the calendar has traditionally showcased. I'm still shocked to be included among so many people who've long influenced not just my work, but how I see the world, and try to see myself. Annie photographed me one year earlier in the pink velvet dress I'd originally bought for prom, in my parents' backyard. At that time, it was still my backyard, too, and had functioned since I was a little kid as a personal photo studio, study, and consistent reminder that I was bigger than I had been the year before, and the year before that, and that this would only keep happening. (I'm still v short, but: relatively speaking.) It was where I learned that as your childhood shrinks around you, so will your sense of wonder, unless you choose to pay close attention to what surrounds you at new heights. When Annie shot me for Pirelli, we were just a few blocks from my new home in NYC. A lot happens in that first year, and not knowing the geography of the city makes every encounter feel totally isolated from the rest of the world, like a castle on a cloud. At the time of this shoot, I was parsing what in this year had seemed significant just because it was new, and then what was enriching. I was exhausted by the sheen, and desperate to develop a kind of discernment which would make me so healthy, so OK with myself, that genuine wonder would return--gravitation towards stuff that isn't just shiny, but illuminates the same sorts of truths I'd learned as a fan of Patti, Yoko, and other women who happen to be in this calendar, too. I decided to cut my hair on the shoot, rid myself of any excess. Annie made me feel completely comfortable, like I was the same person as the year before, but indeed older. Again, still very physically short. My foot is peeking out of that shoe. I urge you to look at the other portraits, all so stunning, bold & nearly impossible to turn away from. They are strongest as a group, but I wanted to share what mine means to me and thank you for following what I do in such a way that has allowed for this to happen.
3. Give “them” a “package deal”. If you have a taste for looking good, why not pass that gift on to others? Many (i mean it) people who follow fashion blogs have very little fashion sense, so if you provide them with something like a good looking outfit, they will be more prone to share/like/follow. I’m not saying give away $200 jeans; i mean put those clothes together (on yourself or just laid out), snap a picture, and put it up as “the outfit for the day” or whatever. You can even geo-target this and base the outfit on the weather (or whatever).
You can’t always hope to run into a gentleman who will carry your six bags around. So, if you don’t want to end up dealing with all that weight by yourself, learn how to pack efficiently – it can come in real handy when you’re in a hurry. Also, there’s a simple way to avoid your clothes getting all crumpled – put the clothing items in different freezer bags carefully, and place them in your suitcase. This is time-consuming, but if you need to attend an important event, freezer bags will keep your clothes clean and neat.
The title of Patti Gibbons's blog, Not Dead Yet, really says it all. She might be a woman in her 60s, but she's not dead yet—and she certainly doesn't dress as such. With a penchant for power prints and a commitment to wearing exactly what she feels like wearing, Gibbons has our stamp of approval (as well as that of outlets like The Huffington Post). 

Fashion is a multibillion-dollar industry that has considerable impact on the way ordinary people dress and present themselves and relies heavily on media and advertising to communicate the producer's preferences and goals and influence public perception through various types of promotion; at the same time, fashion can be influenced by social change and counter-trends outside the producer, retailer or advertiser's control. As fashion is driven by trends within and without the fashion industry, fashion blogs and other "new media" outside the control of traditional establishment represent a disruptive innovation to the social dynamics of mass media and fashion consumption in modern consumer society. It is likely that the blogosphere will have a considerable long-term influence on the industry, as the number of fashion based blogs continue to grow, with increasing numbers of consumers able to create and modify the media that they consume, and traditional producers and advertisers adapting their practices to avoid dilution of their own influence.

Despite being something that everyone does literally every day, getting dressed (or putting together an outfit, if you want to get fancy), can feel like the trickiest, most frustrating part of the morning. Who hasn't stood in front of a closet full of clothing and thought “I have nothing to wear!?” Rest assured, you're not alone in this daily conundrum. To that end, we consulted a panel of experts—top designers, style consultants, and retail pros—to demystify the act (art?) of getting dressed, once and for all.
Instead focus on a name that is fun, unique, and memorable. Opt for a series of 2-4 words that are easy to remember, and not too tricky to spell. You could include your name, or a series of words that sound good together. Consider sneaking words such as fashion or style into the name—but don’t force it. One of our favorite examples of a quirky and memorable blog name is Cupcakes and Cashmere, a blog dedicated to all things food and fashion.
Fashion’s enduring obsession with the 1980s isn’t going anywhere. From Hedi Slimane’s controversial debut at Celine (all puffball off-the-shoulder minidresses and big-shouldered blazers) to the tie-dye T-shirts, stonewashed denim and shell suits at Stella McCartney — not to mention the oversize sweaters and Madonna crosses on show at Marco de Vincenzo — nostalgia for the era appears to have reached critical mass. Much like now, the ’80s were a polarizing decade both politically and culturally. It is not surprising, then, that these tribute fashions also still split the jury. — E.P.
“Your makeup can make or break a great outfit so it’s important to know what works for you and what compliments your features and coloring. Contacting a professional can help you figure out how to make your makeup and clothing work together. Also know that even though many women want a ‘natural look’ it actually takes a lot of products and time to do it right.” —Brooke Baker, beauty and style consultant    These makeup mistakes can make you look sloppy.

By knowing the shape, scale and proportions of your body, you'll be able to select the best clothes and accessories that create a balanced silhouette that help disguise the parts you're self-conscious about to you pave the way for your confidence. This gives you the curves on all the right places, and leaves plenty of room to play up your best assets.


A significant section of the blog is “Outfits,” and this predominantly features what Grasie wears in her daily activities. The posts are highly visual, with captions describing the outfits worn, often explaining why Grasie likes and wears particular items. She generally includes links to sites where her fans can buy items to emulate her look, often giving alternatives in various price ranges.
If you invest in one dress style next season, make sure it has ruching - a romantic take on body-con, and much more forgiving. Carefully-positioned ruching has mighty figure-enhancing potential; it adds curves to slimmer frames and those with curvier silhouettes will appreciate its ability to stretch in the right places. Givenchy balanced ruched detailing with accordion pleating to create a dress that will be at the top of many wishlists next season, while Calvin Klein used it to cinch it in the waist.
Why: Since stumbling across this gorgeous blog, our lives have been so much more colourful. Jess goes beyond the standard #OOTD posts and her site’s a sartorial treasure trove full of styling advice, galleries and even some tips for budding bloggers if you’re thinking of making this list some day. Her masterfully saturated and unique photography is what sets her apart from the rest of the pack and we still can’t stop thinking about her guide to wearing colour this spring…
By knowing the shape, scale and proportions of your body, you'll be able to select the best clothes and accessories that create a balanced silhouette that help disguise the parts you're self-conscious about to you pave the way for your confidence. This gives you the curves on all the right places, and leaves plenty of room to play up your best assets.
There is an enormous, and growing, number of fashion and shopping-related blogs: about 2 million, according to Technorati Inc., [...] or slightly less than 10 percent of the 27 million blogs the company tracks. (That number includes blogs in languages that use the Roman alphabet and that contain anything fashion-related, including sites such as Pink Is the New Blog, which focuses on celebrities.)[14]
Dress For Women, Not For Men:The Man Repeller once told us that if women dressed for men, we'd all be wearing bodycon miniskirts and dresses. This is why we have to dress with other women in mind. It actually makes getting dressed easier when you're dressing for style, not for sex, and your confidence will shine through because you'll be more comfortable in what you're wearing. 

If you already love and wear a particular brand, don’t just ask to be added to the list—also let the agency know why your blog would be an excellent fit and send links of posts where you’ve worn the brand before. Also try directly reaching out to emerging brands that may not be large enough to have their own agency—they’re likely excited to grow their own following and eager to work with you.
Los Angeles blogger and fashion influencer Julie Sarinana shares her personal style inspiration on "Sincerely Jules," a blog she launched when attending the Fashion Institute of Design & Merchandising. Julie has a laid back, approachable, Cali-girl style that often sees her mixing Gap with Gucci, and wearing vintage and flea market finds as well as items from mass retailers. Given her easy, casual approach to getting dressed, it makes sense that she also has her own line of screen print  t-shirts, printed with inspirational and humorous quotes. More » 

One of the new season's most feminine trends came by way of bows. Losing its prissy connotations, they came in vibrant red at Valentino, and in sorbet shades at Emilia Wickstead and Erdem. They were particularly pervasive at London Fashion Week, where they adorned the backs of dresses at Wickstead, Preen and Delpozo. If following suit feels too saccharine, then tailor a polished ponytail with a bow instead like on the Emilia Wickstead catwalk, a look that's has already inspired Poppy Delevingne.
Think quality over quantity. When shopping, pay attention to the materials and craftsmanship of the garments you purchase. Then once you buy quality items, take proper care of them. Have them tailored, have them professionally cleaned regularly as needed, hang them on velvet hangers (just say no to wire hangers!), take your shoes to a cobbler when they need to be polished or resoled. Basic care will go a long way in extending the life of your clothes and shoes!

NOTE: At WPBeginner we believe in transparency. If you sign up with Bluehost using our referral link, we will earn a small commission at no extra cost to you (in fact, you will save money and get a free domain). We would get this commission for recommending just about any WordPress hosting company, but we only recommend products that we use personally use and believe will add value to our readers.
There are both free and premium choices for your blog’s WordPress theme, with extreme price differences, ranging from $3 to $1,000. It definitely makes sense for to sift through the free themes first, because there are so many options and you’ll get a better idea of what you want. Plus, themes are like clothes shopping; you can try the theme on to check the fit before making your selection. Most theme repositories, including WordPress’ own wordpress.org, give you the opportunity to preview a theme before downloading, installing or even paying for it.
Well, do you agree or disagree with me on this subject? I certainly have rather strong opinions on this, but it comes from years of seeing women unfortunately undermine themselves professionally by presenting themselves in a less than professional manner, stylishly speaking. So, as I mentioned, think of your outward aesthetic as an extension of your personal brand. Make the mark you want to leave when you come into contact with someone.
“Does this accentuate the best version of who I am as a woman?” Brother Vellies designer Aurora James asks this, before buying a vibrant animal-print coat or an over-the-top dress. “For me, I love things that have a ‘wow factor,’ so if I’m going to splurge and buy something, I want it to be the clothing version of myself,” James explains. It’s a brilliant trick for making sure that your purchase is something you’ll actually wear; if you feel like yourself in a piece of clothing, you’re more likely to gravitate towards it when it’s hanging in your closet.
Speaking of rules, we should mentioned those regarding showing skin. It’s pretty simple – show one body part at a time. So if you’re showing your cleavage, pay attention you’re not combining that with miniskirts, and the other way around. Looking and feeling attractive shouldn’t be based on how naked you are. A little bit of mystery is always a nice touch. 

Just as we’re settling into the fall groove of checks and plaids, the Spring 2019 season has officially come to a close. And while there were a few overarching ideas to the season, there is truly a trend or a must-have item for everyone. One idea that seemed to resonate with many designers (and showgoers) was that of escapism. At Chloé, Loewe, and Paco Rabanne, the Spring 2019 girl has run off to Ibiza, where she is wearing patchwork textures and layers and using seashells and found objects as jewelry. It's the type of girl who always packs a favorite crochet dress or tie-dye T-shirt that she will throw over her maillot before heading to the beach. On the opposite end of the spectrum, we're seeing all-out '80s, an idea rooted more in the city streets and Hollywood. Eighties acid-washed denim, especially at Proenza Schouler, has officially made its comeback, as have graphic-art prints, as seen at Louis Vuitton. Animal prints are still having a major moment, as are feathers and fringe, which first made a big splash last spring. And while many are still lamenting the loss of Phoebe Philo's Céline, many labels are stepping up to fill in the void. Great suiting appeared all over the runways, including at brands where we are used to seeing more feminine pieces. The classic trench, a signature for minimalists and Philo-philes, is still a runway mainstay, and we saw many clever iterations at Riccardo Tisci's Burberry debut. But aside from a trench or a suit, the item to buy this spring is a pair of shorts. While many street-style stars got a head start on the bike-short revival we saw at Fendi, capri-length tailored shorts, as well as cargo shorts, are clearly the new skirt. For all of Spring 2019's best fashion trends, scroll below.


This site is a go-to for fashion-forward women who are shopping on a budget. Not only is the site dedicated to recreating celebrity looks with cheaper options (that look very similar, if not identical!), but it also is a source for style tips and the latest trends. See an outfit you love on Chrissy Teigen? Just hop over to the site to find out how to have it without spending three months worth of paychecks.
Hence, talking about the characteristic features of the casual style, we can point out such aspects as the daring and unique color shades and combinations, the slightly effortless vibes concerning the design details of the garments and the blends of various styles, etc. To cut the long story short, casual style is made of all the comfortable pieces that every particular person needs to have the ideally accentuated and charismatic looks for every day. One more great thing about this style is that it doesn’t require much money and it even allows you to renovate and use the clothes of your mom or grandma!
The blogosphere has indeed opened up many doors for the fashion industry, one of which is allowing the ordinary people to partake in the 'elite' fashion world and discuss their likes and dislikes on the way fashion is presented in the media.[6] In 2008, the Pulitzer Prize winning fashion writer and former blogger Robin Givhan, claimed that fashion blogs had democratized the fashion industry. Givhan had also written in Harpers Bazaar that 'The rise of the fashion blogger has evolved [fashion] from an aristocratic business dominated by omnipotent designers into a democratic one in which everyone has access to stylistic clothes...the average people, too often estranged from fashion, is not taking ownership of it'.[7] A similar statement was said by Constance White, the style director for E-bay and former fashion journalist, saying that the impact of the fashion blogosphere has allowed the whole population to take ownership of the fashion world, including people of all different races, genders, and social standings.[8] The Daily Mail writer Karen Kay suggested once in an interview that blogs allow anyone to both critique and praise designers, regardless of the often ‘needed’ professional opinion, with the help fashion blogs, the consumers are helping to set the trends.[9]
Hi! I'm editor-in-chief of Rookie, a website for teenage girls that I founded in 2011. Every year we put out a book that compiles the best content from that year of the site. Our most recent is Rookie Yearbook Three, published by Razorbill. It is just over 350 pages, and in addition to loads of beautiful artwork and writing are print-exclusives like stickers, valentines, a Rookie pennant, and contributions from the likes of Dakota and Elle Fanning, Shailene Woodley, Lorde, Grimes, Kelis, Sia, Broad City, Bob's Burgers, and more.
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