"Every woman really only needs 20 core items in her closet," advises Nazarudin. "A black pair of pants, a blue blazer, a cashmere V-neck sweater in a jewel tone, and so on." Outside of these 20, you can experiment with more inexpensive items — if you don't like them, it's not nearly as bad as if you dropped $300 on a trendy piece you only wore once. If you need tips on how to maximize your basics, check out Good Housekeeping Style Director Lori Bergamotto's weeklong experiment in wearing the same thing every day.
In the constantly growing landscape of fashion bloggers, it's an unfortunate fact that the younger crowd significantly outnumbers ladies of a certain age. It seems everywhere you look, it's nothing but beautiful 20-somethings showing off their style, and while there are certainly more of them, that doesn't make them any more relevant or valuable than their more mature counterparts. Fashion is universal, after all.
"…All of a sudden they'll get really good, and then I just start out there, frantically trying to collect as many as I can. One of the things I like to think about is, here I am, with my little piece of cardboard, in the middle of a continent where it's snowing all the time, and so I'm catching some incredibly small number of these things for a brief period, and getting some really cool pictures. So you kind of wonder, what else is out there? What are you missing? I mean, imagine just all the beautiful little works of art that are just falling down, totally unnoticed, and then they just disappear. Stuff that is far prettier than the pictures I have. 'Cause they're out there, you know they're out there. Statistically, they're out there, so you know, there's just an awful lot of really gorgeous things, that are just totally ephemeral and you'll never see them. And they're falling constantly. You sorta wanna just stop the world and go look at them."
For the 2016 Pirelli Calendar, Annie Leibovitz chose to photograph women whose achievements demonstrate a different kind of beauty from what the calendar has traditionally showcased. I'm still shocked to be included among so many people who've long influenced not just my work, but how I see the world, and try to see myself. Annie photographed me one year earlier in the pink velvet dress I'd originally bought for prom, in my parents' backyard. At that time, it was still my backyard, too, and had functioned since I was a little kid as a personal photo studio, study, and consistent reminder that I was bigger than I had been the year before, and the year before that, and that this would only keep happening. (I'm still v short, but: relatively speaking.) It was where I learned that as your childhood shrinks around you, so will your sense of wonder, unless you choose to pay close attention to what surrounds you at new heights. When Annie shot me for Pirelli, we were just a few blocks from my new home in NYC. A lot happens in that first year, and not knowing the geography of the city makes every encounter feel totally isolated from the rest of the world, like a castle on a cloud. At the time of this shoot, I was parsing what in this year had seemed significant just because it was new, and then what was enriching. I was exhausted by the sheen, and desperate to develop a kind of discernment which would make me so healthy, so OK with myself, that genuine wonder would return--gravitation towards stuff that isn't just shiny, but illuminates the same sorts of truths I'd learned as a fan of Patti, Yoko, and other women who happen to be in this calendar, too. I decided to cut my hair on the shoot, rid myself of any excess. Annie made me feel completely comfortable, like I was the same person as the year before, but indeed older. Again, still very physically short. My foot is peeking out of that shoe. I urge you to look at the other portraits, all so stunning, bold & nearly impossible to turn away from. They are strongest as a group, but I wanted to share what mine means to me and thank you for following what I do in such a way that has allowed for this to happen.
Designers went big on all things animalia. For fall, we saw heavy coats and structured jackets in leopard spots and zebra stripes, but for spring, it is all in the unique animal-print details. We loved JW Anderson’s puff leopard-print sleeves and Richard Quinn’s excessive over-the-top take on spots, while Burberry’s mix of zebra on the top and spots on the bottom felt fun and fresh.

“Whenever you think something looks good but you think you couldn’t pull it off, take it to the dressing room and try it on. Some of my most successful styling jobs started with a client saying to me ‘forget it, it’s not my cut, or color, or length’ only for them to end up loving it after they tried it on. What do you have to lose?” Mr. Hernandez     Watch out for these dressing room mistakes it’s time to stop making.
Fashion designers have often referenced art and artists through the years, and for Spring 2019, designers tapped into everything from futurism to Memphis design. At Marni, images were collaged and printed on draped dresses and coats. Most notably, at Louis Vuitton, Nicolas Ghesquière channeled early '90s geometric Memphis pattern on a number of his Spring runway looks.
Fashion blogs first appeared in the blogosphere prior to 2002.[16] Both the number of fashion blogs and the number of media mentions of fashion blogs has grown considerably since then. Published accounts of the growing number of fashion blogs are mentioned above, and a Facteva search reveals that media articles mentioning "fashion blogs" grew from one in 2002 to over 100 in 2006.
“Are you a boho gal who loves kale salads, yoga sessions, and beaded jewelry? Or are you a preppy woman, who loves anything from Kate Spade and has a penchant for stripes? Ask yourself what image you want to project, and how you would want people to describe you based on first impressions. The truth is they are already thinking something about you when they meet you so make sure it’s what you want!” —Christina-Lauren Pollack, fashion expert and Editor of Inspirations & Celebrations     Next, check out these styling tricks that can help you revamp your wardrobe in a weekend.
“Remember how in ‘The Devil Wears Prada’ the editor always wore a single white Hermes scarf as her signature piece? What’s your version of this? No matter how traditional or fashion forward you like to be, have a think about what pieces you really gravitate to and make it your signature style. And it doesn’t have to be a scarf. Consider bright colored shoes, men’s style watches, or classic shirts.” —Ms. Narain
Stock Up On Basics: Known your essentials and stock up. These include white and black blouses, a little black dress, high heels, red lipstick, diamond studs, blue jeans and anything else that has a central role in your style. Remember, these looks are timeless so investing in certain items that are more expensive but higher in quality may be wiser because they will last longer.
1. Think of gray and white hairs as glitter. Blend in those sparkly strands with cool silvery or warm golden salon highlights. Ask for balayage — a free-form technique where highlights are painted on with a brush for an irregular root line — that looks natural and won't leave a ring of regrowth at the scalp. And major bonus: Highlights around the face also brighten tired, ashy or sallow skin tones for a no-makeup-needed radiance.
"Wide Eyed Legless" is the fashion project of Madelynn Hackwith Furlong, a professional designer, art director, stylist and consultant who has collaborated with major brands, including J.Crew and Rachel Comey. Madelynn launched her style blog to inspire modern women to build a simpler, more thoughtful wardrobe, home, and lifestyle. It all started with a massive closet cleanse, that turned into a mission to build "the perfect wardrobe" through buying less, choosing higher-quality pieces, dressing with more intention, and taking an elegantly minimalist approach to the art of dressing. More »
Kathleen’s blog was created out of the realization that post-grad life wasn’t as fabulous as Carrie Bradshaw had led her to believe (even as adults, we’re still trying to solve the puzzle of how Carrie could afford a closet-full of Manolos on a writer’s salary). But looking at her inspiring outfits and picture-perfect lifestyle, you might have to disagree that it is extremely fabulous (except she pulls it all off with affordable pieces and doable outfit ideas).
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