“One of the most important things that people need to realize is that just because they buy something in their ‘size,’ doesn’t mean that it’s going to fit them. People get very invested in being a certain size but this is a huge mistake as different designers cut for different body types and also, many companies ‘play with size’ in order to flatter customers. Buy what fits, regardless of the number on the tag.” —Michael O’Connor, personal stylist
About Blog YesStyle.com is the first online retailer in Asia to globally distribute a wide range of lifestyle and fashion products from the region. On their blog you will find the true definition of Asian Fashion with their Street Photography section, and you will be charmed by the laissez-faire air of their Lifestyle columns. Want in on the BBcream craze? You can turn to their beauty vloggers for a flawless finish. 

Organize Your Closet: Organize your closet. This way you'll be able to see what you own (and actually wear it). Separate your clothes by garment. Figure out what what can be folded neatly and what needs to be hanged. Make sure you get the right hangers for shirts, skirts and pants. Use storage shelves to store your purses and intimates and buy a shoe rack. For more detailed instructions on how to tackle this task, check out what our friends at Lucky Magazine have to say. Source: Lucky Magazine
“You don’t have to spend an arm and a leg to look fantastic, however, we do tend to feel and act a little different when we wear things that are expensive. We treat those things differently too; with more care. We tell ourselves that they are special and that we are special when we wear them. But really it’s the mental story we assign to those items that make them special. Expensive things might trigger those feelings more easily but you can shine just as bright every day with ordinary things, just by acting as you would if they were expensive.” —Jennifer Lowe, stylist and designer for Water Vixen Swim    Learn some more ways you can use clothing to influence your mood.
It's a little awkward, so we'll get straight to the point: This Thursday we humbly ask you to protect Wikipedia's independence. We depend on donations averaging about $16.36, but 99% of our readers don't give. If everyone reading this gave $3, we could keep Wikipedia thriving for years to come. The price of your Thursday coffee is all we need. When we made Wikipedia a non-profit, people warned us we'd regret it. But if Wikipedia became commercial, it would be a great loss to the world. Wikipedia is a place to learn, not a place for advertising. It unites all of us who love knowledge: contributors, readers and the donors who keep us thriving. The heart and soul of Wikipedia is a community of people working to bring you unlimited access to reliable, neutral information. Please take a minute to help us keep Wikipedia growing. Thank you.
“I don’t recommend buying a highly trendy item for a lot of money because in just a few months it’s almost guaranteed to be on the ‘OUT’ list next year. One example this season are the embellished handbags. These fun bags with stars, hearts, moons, and beading can be super fun for some nights out but really shouldn’t be a big part of your fashion budget. I’d look to stores like Zara or Topshop for great versions at an affordable price.” —Mr. Hernandez
If you invested in terracotta shades for summer 2018, you're in luck for summer 2019 as warm rusty reds are still big news. For a truly chic example of how to work it, turn to Valentino where orange and wine colours were seamlessly fused together. Versace chose a sunburnt orange for its impactful satin jacket, as worn by Freja Beha Erichsen on the catwalk. Then there was Balenciaga's Demna Gvasalia deep red cocktail dress, which hopefully signals a hot summer ahead.
Ready for a mind-blowing fashion hack? According to Lauren Edelstein, Style Director at Shopbop, all you need to do to determine whether or not a pair of jeans will fit is to wrap the waist around your neck — if the ends meet without overlapping (or stretching), they'll fit your waist. "The neck trick is one I was skeptical about, but it really works!"
What was it with the beach this season? It was wellspring of designer inspiration, both as a metaphor for life — beauty on the surface, danger roiling beneath — and more literally as a traditional escape. At Calvin Klein, Raf Simons set his meditation on the scuba suit to the Da-Da-Da-Da lip-biting “Jaws” theme and at Etro, there were actual world-class surfers on the runway, along with some ready-to-wear boards. Thom Browne built a boardwalk complete with lifeguard chairs and striped cabanas, and then subverted the Nantucket clichés of seersucker, picnics, whales and lobsters by adding bondage and the risk of broken ankles to the mix and Michael Kors invented his own MK Beach Club. Imagine a community of the mind somewhere between Bora Bora and Miami, and you’ll get the idea. Finally, at Chanel Karl Lagerfeld’s models went frolicking in the watery surf he created (along with trucking in loads of real sand) inside the Grand Palais. All the viewers could do was ride the wave. — VANESSA FRIEDMAN, fashion director, Styles
The title of Patti Gibbons's blog, Not Dead Yet, really says it all. She might be a woman in her 60s, but she's not dead yet—and she certainly doesn't dress as such. With a penchant for power prints and a commitment to wearing exactly what she feels like wearing, Gibbons has our stamp of approval (as well as that of outlets like The Huffington Post).
Writing: I interviewed Taylor Swift for the cover of ELLE, guest-edited a section of the July/August issue of Poetry Magazine, and guest-edited a Rookie section of the October issue of Nylon. So many talented people of all kinds are featured in both, so take a look! I also wrote the introduction to Petra Collins' book, Babe, which showcases the work of many of my favorite artists.
I don't actually think these events really happened to me, but they'll still come to mind when I think back on a time when a secondhand event seemed to hold some kind of truth that reality did not. Example: I felt all weird and drifty at the beginning of last summer, and when I try and revisit that place, I don't literally imagine the view from behind a car windshield and how everything must look to the narrator in Yo La Tengo's "Today Is the Day," but I sure remember the exact sadness that it captured.
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