A significant section of the blog is “Outfits,” and this predominantly features what Grasie wears in her daily activities. The posts are highly visual, with captions describing the outfits worn, often explaining why Grasie likes and wears particular items. She generally includes links to sites where her fans can buy items to emulate her look, often giving alternatives in various price ranges.
4. Dress age-irrelevant. Who says you can't wear a black fisherman cap, short-sleeve or message T-shirts, funky sneakers, slouchy Army-green cargo pants and your hair in a tousle? A little infusion of urban, hippie or eclectic style makes every wardrobe, from classic to casual, a little cooler. Celebs like Meg Ryan, Lisa Bonet, Sharon Stone, Téa Leoni, Robin Wright, Halle Berry and Calista Flockhart all dress in age-irrelevant but supercool ways in their private lives. 

It’s official: I’m wearing things that are a decade old. I’ve had both this ivory coat and camel sweater for a whopping 10 years. (Whoa!) I was inspired to wear them together by the colors on this plaid scarf, which I have quite the affinity for - check out 6 ways I’ve worn it, below. Lots of old things on the blog today but a new way to wear them together!
Purse Essentials: A purse isn't just a fashion statement. It's main purpose is functional. You carry it around wherever you go so it needs to contain some essentials: your wallet, a pen, pain killers, hand sanitizer, tissues, make-up essentials (we personally won't leave the house without lip stick and/or lip balm), hand cream, gum or breath mints, tampons or maxi pads (no one wants to be caught off guard during that time of the month), and for those of you who spend lengthy bouts talking, texting or gaming, bring your phone charger along.
When it comes to fashion tips, it sometimes seems that everyone and their mother (literally!) has tried-and-true style advice they absolutely swear by. Some are useful, while others … well, not so much. With that in mind, we’ve culled 101 style tips from the best: designers, lifestyle experts and, of course, our staff. Trust us: With these gems, you’ll be well on your way to living your most stylish life.
A sloppily cuffed jean. An ill-fitting blazer. A dress that shows just a little too much to be referred to as "tastefully sheer." These are the things that fashion editors and stylists can spot from a million miles away. To those in the biz, the proper proportions of a crop top may be obvious, but for those seeing the trends in a magazine or online, it can be a little trickier to know exactly how to wear everything. 

Women’s fashion week, men’s fashion week — for a few shows, it was everybody’s fashion week, an acknowledgment that the orthodoxies surrounding gender are, at least in certain corners of the world, eroding as we speak. At Maison Margiela, there were bows on boys and suits on girls, and videos of models proclaiming that breaking rules was “My Mutiny.” (It turned out that Mutiny is the name of Margiela’s new fragrance, and that social movements are as co-optable for profit as anything else. Buyer beware.) But there was a genuine sense of play at upstart shows like Luar and Vaquera in New York and the newly rebranded Courrèges in Paris, a refreshing agnosticism about who could (and would) wear what. Who wears the pants? We does! — M.S.


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Dress For Women, Not For Men:The Man Repeller once told us that if women dressed for men, we'd all be wearing bodycon miniskirts and dresses. This is why we have to dress with other women in mind. It actually makes getting dressed easier when you're dressing for style, not for sex, and your confidence will shine through because you'll be more comfortable in what you're wearing.
Vancouver, Canada–based blogger Vanessa Hong manages not only her wildly successful blog, The Haute Pursuit, but also her accompanying fashion line, THP Shop, which is beloved by editors and street style stars alike. She's also a mainstay at every fashion week and a street style star in her own right—photographers love shooting her uniquely edgy, contemporary style.
Mason, who writes a monthly column for Marie Claire and designed her own collection for Modcloth last fall, is one of the most in-demand bloggers working right now. The 29-year-old writer played a role in the promotion and social media around Target's new plus-size collection Ava & Viv and is also a budding TV personality, offering style advice on programs including "Today" and "Good Morning America." Mason is notable because she uses her blog as a platform to discuss bigger social issues, including race, sexuality and body image. 
In the constantly growing landscape of fashion bloggers, it's an unfortunate fact that the younger crowd significantly outnumbers ladies of a certain age. It seems everywhere you look, it's nothing but beautiful 20-somethings showing off their style, and while there are certainly more of them, that doesn't make them any more relevant or valuable than their more mature counterparts. Fashion is universal, after all.
The blogosphere has indeed opened up many doors for the fashion industry, one of which is allowing the ordinary people to partake in the 'elite' fashion world and discuss their likes and dislikes on the way fashion is presented in the media.[6] In 2008, the Pulitzer Prize winning fashion writer and former blogger Robin Givhan, claimed that fashion blogs had democratized the fashion industry. Givhan had also written in Harpers Bazaar that 'The rise of the fashion blogger has evolved [fashion] from an aristocratic business dominated by omnipotent designers into a democratic one in which everyone has access to stylistic clothes...the average people, too often estranged from fashion, is not taking ownership of it'.[7] A similar statement was said by Constance White, the style director for E-bay and former fashion journalist, saying that the impact of the fashion blogosphere has allowed the whole population to take ownership of the fashion world, including people of all different races, genders, and social standings.[8] The Daily Mail writer Karen Kay suggested once in an interview that blogs allow anyone to both critique and praise designers, regardless of the often ‘needed’ professional opinion, with the help fashion blogs, the consumers are helping to set the trends.[9]
Hedi Slimane's debut Celine show may have been divisive, but there are few designers that make tailoring so desirable. Scrap evening dresses in favour of a tuxedo, a chic, nonchalant alternative, and a look favoured not only by Slimane, but also Giambattista Valli who went for crisp white and at Givenchy in the form of tuxedo dresses - a style already worn by the Duchess of Sussex. Alexander McQueen created a keyhole tux to reveal a hint of skin and Hermès showcased versions with missing buttons.
8. Find your new perfect bra. Get fitted for the breasts you have now — not the 34B you think you are (and were in college). Head straight for the lingerie section of a department store or find the perfect size by following an online quiz at ThirdLove.  Weight changes, gravity and fitness routine (or lack of) affect your chest size. If you wear the right bra, your clothes will fit better and your entire silhouette will look longer and trimmer. Buy two: one to wear, one as a backup for laundry days (and always hand-wash and hang dry). Bosomy celebs keep their breasts up and off their midriff. You should, too.
About Blog The Darling Detail, LLC is an Austin-based fashion and inspiration blog designed to emphasize on-trend, classic, and everyday details with a specific focus on fast fashion, professional photography and relatable writing. By incorporating a chic, feminine and darling-esque style with inspiring details that are affordable, attainable and on-trend.
The versions about the origin of casual style are diverse, too. According to one, it originated in a small Scottish town Aberdeen, particularly in a football club, where everyone wore his/her name on the clothes. The fans of football and the founders of this club wanted to be different from the others and they created a unique football style, characterized by the pieces of certain brands. Further, the football fans realized that the brands were not at all important. And they started concentrating on the comfort and the harmony of the pieces that were combined and the casual style was born. According to another version, the native Scandinavian people of the countryside used this style for their combinations.
If you invest in one dress style next season, make sure it has ruching - a romantic take on body-con, and much more forgiving. Carefully-positioned ruching has mighty figure-enhancing potential; it adds curves to slimmer frames and those with curvier silhouettes will appreciate its ability to stretch in the right places. Givenchy balanced ruched detailing with accordion pleating to create a dress that will be at the top of many wishlists next season, while Calvin Klein used it to cinch it in the waist.
Kathleen’s blog was created out of the realization that post-grad life wasn’t as fabulous as Carrie Bradshaw had led her to believe (even as adults, we’re still trying to solve the puzzle of how Carrie could afford a closet-full of Manolos on a writer’s salary). But looking at her inspiring outfits and picture-perfect lifestyle, you might have to disagree that it is extremely fabulous (except she pulls it all off with affordable pieces and doable outfit ideas).

Neely, 31, launched Fashion Toast in 2007. Her particular style of blogging -- photo-heavy posts featuring cool clothes and model poses -- has greatly influenced the generation of influencers who have followed her. While Neely has collaborated with established brands in the past, she recently launched her own line. Are You Am I, a collection of slip dresses, tap pants and distinctly cut tees, is notable for its specificity. For fans who want to emulate Neely's style -- and there are plenty of them -- there is nothing more perfect. 
"Every woman really only needs 20 core items in her closet," advises Nazarudin. "A black pair of pants, a blue blazer, a cashmere V-neck sweater in a jewel tone, and so on." Outside of these 20, you can experiment with more inexpensive items — if you don't like them, it's not nearly as bad as if you dropped $300 on a trendy piece you only wore once. If you need tips on how to maximize your basics, check out Good Housekeeping Style Director Lori Bergamotto's weeklong experiment in wearing the same thing every day.
After you’ve checked the “Terms and Regulations” box, return to where you started—the Bluehost homepage. In the upper right corner, you’ll see the login button. Enter your domain/username and password to enter your account. Then, find the WordPress icon and click for quick install. Shortly after, you’ll receive your credentials via email, so be sure to check your inbox.
Based in Charleston, Julia Engel also started her blog, Gal Meets Glam, when she was a college student. At first, her style landed her partnerships with brands such as Coach, Gap, and Tory Burch. Lately, she’s become one of the top fashion Instagram influencers with a following of 1.1 million. And, she is going to be launching her own line of clothing soon.
Today I am 20. The Crucible, in which I play Mary Warren, opened at the Walter Kerr Theatre three weeks ago, March 31st—also the eight-year anniversary of this blog. I have a lot of trouble comprehending that writing Style Rookie led to writing for other places, then starting Rookie, then being able to audition for plays that I love and to be inside of them for long periods of time, which is an inexplicably wonderful way to live a life. But I am really really really insanely thankful for all of it, and many of you have followed for a LONG time, and that means a lot. Right now, I'm very slowly writing something that I hope will effectively articulate the strangeness of the way these all overlap—the fictions we get to try on via diary/blog-keeping, and acting, and personal style. But that's a longterm hermit project. I just wanted to mention it because in my attempt to briefly list recent stuff I've been up to, I may sound callous, but: None of this goes unexamined or unappreciated.
One of the new season's most feminine trends came by way of bows. Losing its prissy connotations, they came in vibrant red at Valentino, and in sorbet shades at Emilia Wickstead and Erdem. They were particularly pervasive at London Fashion Week, where they adorned the backs of dresses at Wickstead, Preen and Delpozo. If following suit feels too saccharine, then tailor a polished ponytail with a bow instead like on the Emilia Wickstead catwalk, a look that's has already inspired Poppy Delevingne.
And for an expert tip: Arabelle of Fashion Pirate attributes her inspiration to her friends, sharing, “it was their unintentional encouragement that got me to where I am today,” adding that, through the blogging process, she sees the most important change from start-to-finish as “the many friends [she’s] made from blogging, and the experiences [she’s] had with them.” So, bloggers, there's power in numbers.
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