Don't Pretend It Fits: We've all been there, standing in the dressing room and convincing ourselves that the button will magically stay closed when we get home (and then, of course, it doesn't). These are the times where we have to accept that our bodies have changed in one way or another, and buy clothes that fit. Because you know what happens to the clothes that don't fit (cue garbage bags being dropped off at Goodwill here).

I was asked to share my "big big world" at the Sydney Opera House and the Melbourne Writers Festival and mostly talked about fangirling, the anxiety of influence, and being happy instead of putting pressure on yourself to be some tortured artist. I love Neil Gaiman's "make good art" speech, but I wanted to talk about what happens when you can't make good art, and about how fulfilling it can be to appreciate other people's art. If you prefer to watch the FIRST-EVER DELIVERY of this thing, the Sydney one is here, but I've embedded the slightly-updated Melbourne one above.
How to actually do it: "Figure out your go-to, foolproof looks," says designer Nanette Lepore, then seek out variations on that theme. Stumped? Picture the outfits that you feel most comfortable in. Or ask people close to you what you look best in. Once you've zeroed in on what works, find different takes. "I gravitate toward jackets, so I'll do a bomber style, then a silk version, or a denim jacket with leather sleeves," says Minkoff. "Whenever you feel the need to talk yourself into things, that's a red flag that you shouldn't buy them," says Minkoff. If you have doubts in the dressing room, it may help to take a photo of yourself in the item, suggests Aerin Lauder, the founder and creative director of the lifestyle brand Aerin. "It's much more accurate than looking in the mirror."
The ‘80s have been back for quite a few seasons now, but there seems to be no stopping this trend. In past seasons, designers have referenced the decade’s big shoulders and glam hues. This season, many designers brought in acid-washed denim. The trend kicked off in New York, with Proenza Schouler sending out a bevy of almost whitewashed denim dresses, trousers, and jackets, and culminated in Paris, where Chanel, Dior, and Stella McCartney jumped on board.
“As a size 14 myself, I have loved seeing the emergence of plus-sized women in fashion who have completely shattered expectations and rules over the last few years (i.e. Gabi Fresh, Nicolette Mason, Tanesha Awasthi, Margie Plus to name a few). Their confidence shines through in every photograph, and they don’t listen to silly rules about what ‘curvy’ girls can and can’t wear. They just wear what they love.” —Alison Jimenez, stylist and blogger at NYC Recessionista

"My style is really minimalist. The simpler, the better. I always try to have a balance between what I'm wearing in my upper and lower body. If I'm wearing some simple jeans or a simple skirt, I try to add some scarves or lots of necklaces. If I wear lots of neck accessories I avoid using big hats and lots of bracelets. And it's the other way round: If I'm wearing some saggy jeans with a huge belt I try to keep it simple in the upper body. " —Submitted by Valeria Bernal Malek
“When people are constantly chasing the next trend, they can look like they’re trying too hard. It’s better to have a true, individual sense of style and for those of us who are navigating between work, family, friends, and a social life, it comes down to balance. Dress simply and have great accent pieces.” —Ms. Morzin    Watch out for the things your boss wishes you’d stop wearing to work.
Tapping into '80s and '90s workout gear, the new wave of athleisure is going full-on throwback. Retro workout pieces weren't just spotted on Rihanna's Fenty x Puma Spring collection, but also at fashion houses like Gucci, Tod's, and Louis Vuitton, bringing the ultimate mashup of high fashion and the gym. For 2018, incorporate the pieces once reserved for old-school workout videos into your everyday wardrobe.
Dress For Women, Not For Men:The Man Repeller once told us that if women dressed for men, we'd all be wearing bodycon miniskirts and dresses. This is why we have to dress with other women in mind. It actually makes getting dressed easier when you're dressing for style, not for sex, and your confidence will shine through because you'll be more comfortable in what you're wearing.
"My style is really minimalist. The simpler, the better. I always try to have a balance between what I'm wearing in my upper and lower body. If I'm wearing some simple jeans or a simple skirt, I try to add some scarves or lots of necklaces. If I wear lots of neck accessories I avoid using big hats and lots of bracelets. And it's the other way round: If I'm wearing some saggy jeans with a huge belt I try to keep it simple in the upper body. " —Submitted by Valeria Bernal Malek
About Blog Welcome to StyleMeSamira, a visual diary created to share a daily dose of my life, style, & everything in between! I wanted a place where I could offer my knowledge & ability to show women that they don’t have to be a size 2 to be chic. Learning what works best for your body type & of course how to wear it more than once. Being Fashionable is just as much about confidence as it is about style.
He wasn’t the only designer to incorporate artwork into the runway experience. At Loewe, Jonathan Anderson installed several rooms of artwork at Maison de l’Unesco for his show: There were woven baskets in some (by Joe Hogan, a finalist for this year's Loewe Craft Prize and one of its past winners), ceramics in others (by Ryoji Koie) and, in the room where I was seated, giant whirring brushes of the kind that you might otherwise find at a car wash (by Lara Favoretto) — after the show, security guards gleefully posed alongside them. And at Vivienne Westwood, Andreas Kronthaler went full circus. He worked with Bernhard Willhelm, who art directed the show; there were musclemen riding scooters and models riding skateboards and, as a centerpiece, an enormous paper sculpture by the London-based set designer Gary Card, who spent the show in the middle of it all, fixing and remolding it with a team of assistants wielding bottles of flame retardant. The cumulative effect — and how often can you say this at a fashion show — was a good time had by all. — MATTHEW SCHNEIER, deputy fashion critic and reporter, Styles
Sporty surf looks were prevalent throughout the season. Perhaps the most major runway moment was at up-and-coming designer Marine Serre’s show, where she created couturelike looks out of neoprene commonly used for wetsuits. Also picking up on this surf trend was CALVIN KLEIN 205W39NYC, with a scuba-inspired ensemble, and Etro, where the model even toted around a printed surfboard. The surf look was even given a luxe makeover by Hermès, where a neoprene swimsuit was layered under a chic leather skirt. 

Proving once and for all that the minimal trend is over, this show season saw attendees embrace lashings of fabric. While this meant bold ruffles and oversized silhouettes, it also resulted in statement puff shoulders on both dresses and blouses. Simultaneously striking and stylish, these puff sleeves added a fun ’80s twist to modern outfits. Try the look yourself if you’re after a powerful and fashionable daytime style. Just be sure to keep the rest of your look subdued, so you don’t appear over-the-top.
I also loved “copy your competition and then be better”; what sets each person/blog apart is the perspective they write from. We’re all unique like snowflakes (how precious) but the reality of it is, how are you showing that uniqueness? In order to be a successful blogger, you need to connect with your audience in a way they want to be connected with. Recycling ideas and putting your unique voice and creativity on them is how you’ll connect in a different way than others have. I just bought a book, “Steal like an artist” (by Austin Kleon) that talks about this exact thing!
“I wish people understood that in fashion less is more.  For example, if you are wearing an off-the-shoulder top, make that your focal point. You don’t need anything else. Huge earrings or a statement necklace will be overwhelming—the top is sexy chic as is!” —Jennifer Berger, stylist and president of Wear it Well   These fashion mistakes are making you look older.
During the 2011 New York City Fashion Week, top-tier fashion designers, Lazaro Hernandez and Jack McCollough (owners and designers of Proenza Schouler), took the time out of their ‘hectic schedules’ during fashion week to help promote the work of fashion bloggers. The two were interviewed by Imran Amed, founder and editor of The Business of Fashion website. In the 5:15 minute long interview, the two fashion designers were asked various questions from an audience of fashion bloggers, including their personal opinions on the effects of fashion blog writing, how it influences the fashion industry as a whole, and how fashion blog posts affects their designing and selling process. When asked about their thoughts on the overall effect of the fashion blogs, McCollough stated, “Blogs posting things about us, going viral, spreading throughout the internet… it has an extraordinary impact on the business”. They also stated how in the past, they would have to wait three, four days to hear a review on their line, but now the feedback comes almost instant. When asked about how the blogs directly affect their own designs, they explained while they do read numerous blogs daily, they try to take each criticism (positive or negative) with a grain of salt, “We try not to obsess over it” stated McCollough.[4]

There was a refreshing shift on the runways this season, and it had little to do with the clothes and everything to do with the casting. While plenty of new faces graced the catwalks as usual, the real surprise was the reappearance of some of the greatest models of the ’90s. Yasmin Le Bon walked at Calvin Klein, Stella Tennant and Georgina Grenville starred at Ferragamo, and Shalom Harlow — who hasn’t set foot on the runway in years — closed Versace (in a floral lace gown and a cloud of her natural ringlets). These women added to the shows a kind of diversity that has been lacking: a range of ages. They also lent strength to the collections, thanks in part to their walks: the powerful, showstopping strides of the original supermodels. — MALINA JOSEPH GILCHRIST, style director, women’s, T magazine 

The 27-year-old Italian, who now lives in Los Angeles, has the broadest reach of any individual fashion blogger on our list, with more than 3 million Instagram followers. She's a global star, as popular in Europe as she is in the U.S. What's more, links from her site drive traffic and conversions, according to many of the brands with whom she has partnered. She was also recently named to an expert panel that will help determine the shortlist for 2015's LVMH Prize. Oh, and she graced the cover of Lucky magazine's February issue along with fellow bloggers Nicole Warne and Zanita Whittington. 
After a massive change of direction in life, just a few weeks ago, I launched a fashion blog (of sorts) after a career of copywriting. Being new to photography (SO much to learn) and writing predominantly how-to posts is certainly time consuming, and for now, I’m just sticking with weekly posts so I can keep the quality high. I spent just as long putting together my about page. 

About Blog Cella Jane is a personal life and personal style blog written by Becky Hillyard. It was founded in 2012 as an outlet for Becky's love for fashion and beauty. Cella Jane became a place to showcase and document her personal style on a daily basis. Today, readers can expect to see topics ranging from fashion, beauty, fitness, baby, motherhood, and much more.
“I don’t recommend buying a highly trendy item for a lot of money because in just a few months it’s almost guaranteed to be on the ‘OUT’ list next year. One example this season are the embellished handbags. These fun bags with stars, hearts, moons, and beading can be super fun for some nights out but really shouldn’t be a big part of your fashion budget. I’d look to stores like Zara or Topshop for great versions at an affordable price.” —Mr. Hernandez
It's a little awkward, so we'll get straight to the point: This Thursday we humbly ask you to protect Wikipedia's independence. We depend on donations averaging about $16.36, but 99% of our readers don't give. If everyone reading this gave $3, we could keep Wikipedia thriving for years to come. The price of your Thursday coffee is all we need. When we made Wikipedia a non-profit, people warned us we'd regret it. But if Wikipedia became commercial, it would be a great loss to the world. Wikipedia is a place to learn, not a place for advertising. It unites all of us who love knowledge: contributors, readers and the donors who keep us thriving. The heart and soul of Wikipedia is a community of people working to bring you unlimited access to reliable, neutral information. Please take a minute to help us keep Wikipedia growing. Thank you.
Leotards have long been linked with ballet dancers - a key inspiration for Dior this season, making a stretch maillot and skirt pairing perhaps inevitable. At Stella McCartney and Chanel, they were styled with wide-leg trousers, creating a fuss-free, streamlined silhouette. A similar look was seen at Balenciaga, where a neon leotard-cum-swimsuit was teamed with velvet trousers for an unexpected evening look.

References: Why You Truly Never Leave High School. Paul Feig's guest DJ choices on KCRW. Chuck Klosterman's essay on Dazed and Confused, in which he states, "Dazed and Confused is not a movie about how things were; Dazed and Confused is a movie about how things are remembered." Those fuzzy photograph-looking paintings by Gerhard Richter. Any Rodarte collection that cites California as inspiration. Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind.

The New York Times "Style" section writer, Eric Wilson, did an extensive study on the impact of fashion bloggers on the fashion industry for one of his style columns. Wilson wrote that these bloggers have ascended ‘from the nosebleed seats to the front row’ in the past year and that the divide between the ‘high code’ editors with a professional opinion and the ‘amateur’ fashion bloggers is beginning to disintegrate. Wilson interviewed prominent publicists, editors and designers. Publicist Kelly Cutrone stated that over the past two years, there has been a complete change in who is writing about fashion. Not only does Cutrone say she needs to keep a watch on the editors of mainstream writings, such as Vogue and Elle, but now she needs to monitor on the millions of fashion bloggers around the world. Cutrone goes on the later state that once these bloggers post anything on the internet, it never comes off, and it now becomes the first thing that the designers will see.[5]
Two styles of shorts prevailed on the catwalks - cycling shorts or board shorts. Not everyone will feel brave to wear the numerous stretch styles that were worn with jackets at Chanel and solo at Stella McCartney, so Prada's duchesse satin board shorts - available in muted jewel tones - will provide an alternative. Rejina Pyo's slouchy green style will also prove popular as the weather heats up.
Devoting this much time to your closet is unnecessary if you don’t take care of all those clothes you’ve carefully chosen. One quality iron, a nice detergent and a couple of seconds you should devote to checking the instructions on a garment is all it takes, so don’t be lazy. There is something for everyone on this list, and the truth of the matter is that mastering some fashion basics will allow you to develop and polish up a unique style that suits you very well and let’s you stand out, but has a universally aesthetic quality to it at the same time.
Why: The leggy blonde provides a tres chic mix of outfit inspiration – her personal style definitely has that insouciant French vibe – and trend and brand lowdowns. The ‘boutique’ section of her site is a one-stop shop for the pieces she loves – and we also like the fact she has regular wardrobe clearouts via Vestiaire so true Camille-alikes can snap up her actual clothes…
You know how some people simply know how to wear the right clothes? There’s no mystery there, and actually, you could pull it off, too, by just thinking about what you’re wearing a little bit more. It all depends on how your body is built – you should tend to accent your features in the right way. For example, wearing V neck will make your torso look longer, and wearing nude pups will do miracles for the length of your legs. Embrace your shape and learn to love all its imperfections.

“If you have a pear body type, look for styles that elongate your figure to take the emphasis away from your lower body. You want to draw attention to your upper torso, and the best ways to do that are with pairing dark colored bottom pieces with lighter shades and patterns up top. Think of bold patterns and necklines that have detailing like embellishments or ruffles. You should avoid skinny jeans and instead opt for boot cut or those with a slight flare. Showing your shoulders also helps in drawing attention upwards and balancing your top half with your bottom half proportions.” —Ms. Michniak    Here are other denim mistakes you make that could ruin your outfit.


1. Think of gray and white hairs as glitter. Blend in those sparkly strands with cool silvery or warm golden salon highlights. Ask for balayage — a free-form technique where highlights are painted on with a brush for an irregular root line — that looks natural and won't leave a ring of regrowth at the scalp. And major bonus: Highlights around the face also brighten tired, ashy or sallow skin tones for a no-makeup-needed radiance.
"We Wore What" is the brainchild of Danielle Bernstein, who launched her passion for fashion project while a student at New York City's Fashion Institute of Technology. What began as a daily outfit inspiration blog has grown into an aspirational site for those who crave all things beautiful, with posts covering fashion, decor, and lifestyle. Still, it's the fashion photos that keep many of Danielle's million-plus followers coming back, as "Who Wore What" shares impeccably curated and styled outfits from its founder's daily charmed life. More »

1. Think of gray and white hairs as glitter. Blend in those sparkly strands with cool silvery or warm golden salon highlights. Ask for balayage — a free-form technique where highlights are painted on with a brush for an irregular root line — that looks natural and won't leave a ring of regrowth at the scalp. And major bonus: Highlights around the face also brighten tired, ashy or sallow skin tones for a no-makeup-needed radiance.
2) Converting traffic – Publish a weekly newsletter once a week. Keep it brief and share 1 tip each week. This has worked really well for me to build up a relationship with my readers and drives sales of my online app courses. When people email to thank you for free info shared to your mailing list, and converted to buying paid courses based on this, you are on the right track.

To play it safe, combine a neutral, like flax, with something bolder, like yellow. But think twice about pairing intense hues with black, which "can look dated," says designer Chris Benz. For something punchier, try two colors that are beside each other on the color wheel, such as coral and orange. Not sure where to begin? "Notice what colors you love and respond to in your decor," says Benz.
"My style is really minimalist. The simpler, the better. I always try to have a balance between what I'm wearing in my upper and lower body. If I'm wearing some simple jeans or a simple skirt, I try to add some scarves or lots of necklaces. If I wear lots of neck accessories I avoid using big hats and lots of bracelets. And it's the other way round: If I'm wearing some saggy jeans with a huge belt I try to keep it simple in the upper body. " —Submitted by Valeria Bernal Malek

Unlike fashion-focused magazines and television shows, fashion blogs are able to be updated more frequently, keeping up to date with the new and up-and-coming fashion trends.[10] Not only are fashion blogs easier to access, many fashion blog readers (interviewed in Swedish fashion management study) stated that fashion blogs are far more personable and are more 'up to date' on both local and foreign trends. These blogs are granting unlimited access to the fashion world to anyone that has a connection to a computer. Karen Kay also stated that, “These days, before a designer’s runway show has even finished, you can bet your bottom dollar that someone in the audience, or better still, backstage, has recorded every silhouette, signature shoe, styling detail and sulking supermodel, then uploaded it onto the internet for style watchers across the globe to enjoy”.[citation needed] The interviewed Swedish fashion blog readers, stated above, had also stated that fashion blogs had helped share and promote new trends to a much greater extent than other fashion mediums. Unlike mainstream magazines and newspapers, which are constricted to what they write, blogs have the ease of writing about anything that interests author(s), allowing for a more broad spectrum of focused fashion trends.[9]
“One of the most important things that people need to realize is that just because they buy something in their ‘size,’ doesn’t mean that it’s going to fit them. People get very invested in being a certain size but this is a huge mistake as different designers cut for different body types and also, many companies ‘play with size’ in order to flatter customers. Buy what fits, regardless of the number on the tag.” —Michael O’Connor, personal stylist
Los Angeles-based wardrobe stylist and YouTube vlogger Chriselle Lim is the fashionable force behind "The Chriselle Factor," a fashion blog that provides insight into her personal fashion style. Chriselle's site covers fashion, beauty, and lifestyle topics, ranging from travel to fitness and home decor. In the Fashion section of her blog, Chriselle shares photos of the drool-worthy outfits she wears to her jaunts to Fashion Week in Paris and New York City, among other stylish points of travel. Informed by a fashion sense that's super-feminine and completely trend-obsessed, this blog is a major destination for anyone looking for up-to-the-moment fashion inspiration. More »
×