10. Master getting in and out of a car. This is a move we all need to know, and it is crucial when wearing skirts or dresses. To get in a car, seat yourself first while facing the open door. Then keep your legs together and swing them in before scooting over a bit. To get out, keep your legs together and swing them out. Then grab the door and gracefully stand.  

It may seem contradictory to the current sociopolitical climate that the sexy and glamorous ’80s are back, but they are—although not in a Krystle Carrington of “Dynasty,” or Madonna circa “Holiday” sort of way. This time around, the way to do the ’80s is to choose one or two pieces or one accent color to get the vibe. Think pops of bright color, rather than an entire outfit in a shocking bright shade.
"...It's hard to stay mad when there's so much beauty in the world. Sometimes I feel like I'm seeing it all at once, and it's too much, my heart fills up like a balloon that's about to burst...and then I remember to relax, and stop trying to hold on to it, and then it flows through me like rain and I can't feel anything but gratitude for every single moment of my stupid little life."

If you invest in one dress style next season, make sure it has ruching - a romantic take on body-con, and much more forgiving. Carefully-positioned ruching has mighty figure-enhancing potential; it adds curves to slimmer frames and those with curvier silhouettes will appreciate its ability to stretch in the right places. Givenchy balanced ruched detailing with accordion pleating to create a dress that will be at the top of many wishlists next season, while Calvin Klein used it to cinch it in the waist.
I don't actually think these events really happened to me, but they'll still come to mind when I think back on a time when a secondhand event seemed to hold some kind of truth that reality did not. Example: I felt all weird and drifty at the beginning of last summer, and when I try and revisit that place, I don't literally imagine the view from behind a car windshield and how everything must look to the narrator in Yo La Tengo's "Today Is the Day," but I sure remember the exact sadness that it captured.
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