“Whenever you think something looks good but you think you couldn’t pull it off, take it to the dressing room and try it on. Some of my most successful styling jobs started with a client saying to me ‘forget it, it’s not my cut, or color, or length’ only for them to end up loving it after they tried it on. What do you have to lose?” Mr. Hernandez     Watch out for these dressing room mistakes it’s time to stop making.
The hardest part of shopping is deciding when it’s enough. It’s more than easy to be carried away, but with a little bit of planning, you’ll be able to make it work. Start by making a list of items you need. Second step is to look for possible discounts, or some coupons you might have. However, don’t buy something just because it’s cheap – the chances you won’t put it one more than twice. Remember, cost-effective and cheap are not synonyms. It’s important to stick with your schedule, and make a type of agreement with yourself. Also, always pick quality before quantity. If you’re in doubt should you purchase an expensive item, make sure to check its lining – if you’re able to notice its quality, take it. A nice lining is a signature of designer clothes.
7. Wear bangs. Whether straight and full, long and feathery or sideswept, a fringe is a game changer. Bangs camouflage three things: the vertical creases between the eyes that create an angry look; forehead creases that make you appear stressed; and thin and skimpy brows that require extra makeup. Full bangs give your face definition, create the illusion of higher cheekbones and draw attention to the eyes. Sideswept bangs hide a receding hairline, make hair look fuller and blend in easily.  
Lyn Slater has earned herself plenty of accolades and press (including from us at Who What Wear) for her vivacious spirit and similarly poised sense of style. Her blog, Accidental Icon, is aptly titled: Slater had a successful career as a university professor before she embarked on her blog, which started as a fun hobby and launched her into the sartorial stratosphere. 

It covers many aspects of men's fashion, from Menswear 101 to Outfit of the Day to Dressiquette. For instance, there are fascinating articles entitled “Braces or Belt, Never Both,” “Match Leather to Leather and Metal to Metal,” and “Dressiquette – Your socks should match your pants.” (Although your socks should match your pants, not your shoes, Sergio believes you only need to worry about this in formal situations – he prefers high-contrast brightly colored socks).
II. My understanding of death deepens. I think I'd always assumed I'd at least get to watch my funeral go down and have a few suspicions confirmed concerning who would write awkward "Happy Birthday! Miss you :(" messages on my Facebook wall long after I'd passed. I thought I'd get to still see how this whole "world" thing turns out: Do we all explode? Do things start to suck less first? Does everyone get sick of technology and start to live like the Amish, inspired by that one episode of Arthur? DO PEOPLE STILL WATCH ARTHUR?

IV. I listen to the "Bliss" episode of Radiolab, and the reasoning behind my impulses feels confirmed by the segment on snowflakes. So taken with their beauty, a young man in the 1880s named Wilson Bentley spent day after day trying to catch and document them, first through drawing and then photography. He only had about five minutes before one would melt, and had to hold his breath the whole time to keep from giving off any extra heat. Today, physics professor and snowflake expert Kenneth Libbrecht travels worldwide to do the same.
For the best chances of converting people to readers of your site, write about topics that will be interesting for the readers of that particular blog. For example, if your blog covers bargain fashion deals and the site you’re guest posting on targets professional women, combine those efforts by writing a post on, say, five workplace looks under $50.
A significant section of the blog is “Outfits,” and this predominantly features what Grasie wears in her daily activities. The posts are highly visual, with captions describing the outfits worn, often explaining why Grasie likes and wears particular items. She generally includes links to sites where her fans can buy items to emulate her look, often giving alternatives in various price ranges.
Gray checked blazers took over the street style scene and our Instagram feeds this past season, but the trend is just getting started. Flourishing into full-on plaid, the print was everywhere from the runways to the street style set outside the shows. From colorful coats to menswear-inspired blazers to unexpected plaid accessories, there are endless ways to weave the trend into your wardrobe this year.

7. Wear bangs. Whether straight and full, long and feathery or sideswept, a fringe is a game changer. Bangs camouflage three things: the vertical creases between the eyes that create an angry look; forehead creases that make you appear stressed; and thin and skimpy brows that require extra makeup. Full bangs give your face definition, create the illusion of higher cheekbones and draw attention to the eyes. Sideswept bangs hide a receding hairline, make hair look fuller and blend in easily.  


Devoting this much time to your closet is unnecessary if you don’t take care of all those clothes you’ve carefully chosen. One quality iron, a nice detergent and a couple of seconds you should devote to checking the instructions on a garment is all it takes, so don’t be lazy. There is something for everyone on this list, and the truth of the matter is that mastering some fashion basics will allow you to develop and polish up a unique style that suits you very well and let’s you stand out, but has a universally aesthetic quality to it at the same time.


Accidents happen, you can’t argue with that. No matter how careful you are, something will get spilled when you least expected it. So, have a spare clothing item nearby at all times possible. Start by taking something to your office, like perhaps a white button-down shirt, which is a classic, and it will probably be able to fit in your outfit. Believe it or not, most woman don’t have the right white shirt – it’s the same story like the one with bras, so look for a second opinion when purchasing one.

The New York Times "Style" section writer, Eric Wilson, did an extensive study on the impact of fashion bloggers on the fashion industry for one of his style columns. Wilson wrote that these bloggers have ascended ‘from the nosebleed seats to the front row’ in the past year and that the divide between the ‘high code’ editors with a professional opinion and the ‘amateur’ fashion bloggers is beginning to disintegrate. Wilson interviewed prominent publicists, editors and designers. Publicist Kelly Cutrone stated that over the past two years, there has been a complete change in who is writing about fashion. Not only does Cutrone say she needs to keep a watch on the editors of mainstream writings, such as Vogue and Elle, but now she needs to monitor on the millions of fashion bloggers around the world. Cutrone goes on the later state that once these bloggers post anything on the internet, it never comes off, and it now becomes the first thing that the designers will see.[5]
I don't actually think these events really happened to me, but they'll still come to mind when I think back on a time when a secondhand event seemed to hold some kind of truth that reality did not. Example: I felt all weird and drifty at the beginning of last summer, and when I try and revisit that place, I don't literally imagine the view from behind a car windshield and how everything must look to the narrator in Yo La Tengo's "Today Is the Day," but I sure remember the exact sadness that it captured.
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