Once you work through the basic steps you can turn your attention to finding an eye-catching design for your blog.  If you follow the process in the tutorial you will find that designing a blog is actually very easy.  There are pre-designed blog layouts called “themes” that allow you to change and customize your blog design with just a few clicks.  There are a thousands of these themes available, so if you are totally lost on which one to choose here are some recommendations:
1. Get a graphic designer’s help early on. Even if you purchase a wordpress theme and add your own logo, your web site can still look like crap. I’ve seen blurry logos and color-schemes that make me want to gouge my eyes out…from bloggers who think their site looks great. The more professional-looking your site, the more trust your readers will have in you.

On the flip side, this option is “free”, but is going to take more time on your end. Before you reach out to an expert for advice, make sure you do your homework. Experts are often busy people. Make sure you search if they answered the questions you want to ask before. Skim through their blogs, Twitter, check if they’ve been interviewed on a podcast or magazine. If you can’t find the answer you’re looking for, only then should you consider reaching out to them. For that, I highly recommend reading this post: “How to get the attention of your favorite expert”
The fact of something is called cashmere shouldn’t mean much, so the first step towards a long and happy life of an item made out of cashmere is purchasing a quality item. This material can be processed in many different ways, so you could easily end up with an overpaid poor quality sweater. However, there are some indicators that can show you what are you looking at. First, you should be looking for thick knitted garments, and second, try stretching it – if it pulls back, it’s a good type of cashmere. Chances are, you’ll pay good money for any quality cashmere item, so you should take care of it, which means washing it in cold water by hand.

This is where you should start – there’s no room for change if you don’t make it yourself. Open up your closet and take a good look at your clothes. You should ask yourself one simple question – if you were in a store right now, what items from your closet would you buy? It’s a very simple and quite efficient game you should play once in a while. If you want to stop spending hours in front of your closet, it needs to be neat and color coordinated – hoarding clothes always leads to a mess. All clothes you decide need to go shouldn’t be thrown away – donate them! That way, you’ll feel good about it.


You cannot move forward if you choose to look backward. My Uncle Joe, who was an Ojibwa, married to my cousin, often said as long as the chiefs can keep my people hostage on reserves they'll never amount to anything. Joe was a wise man, wiser than all the politicians and and self serving chiefs, because one day the younger generation will leave the reserves and become full participants in society, hopefully enjoying equal benefits as well as equal responsibility.
"Reflecting and archiving is not the same as dwelling in the past. It is not anti-living, but a part of life, even a crucial one. We do this to highlight one thing above others, so that a special moment can take up more space in our brains than an inconsequential one; so that, by plain math, our personal worlds contain more good things and fewer bad ones. Or more interesting things and fewer blah ones, since you have to record the bad, too."
7. Wear bangs. Whether straight and full, long and feathery or sideswept, a fringe is a game changer. Bangs camouflage three things: the vertical creases between the eyes that create an angry look; forehead creases that make you appear stressed; and thin and skimpy brows that require extra makeup. Full bangs give your face definition, create the illusion of higher cheekbones and draw attention to the eyes. Sideswept bangs hide a receding hairline, make hair look fuller and blend in easily.  

These memories worsen with time. The original events often occur in adolescence, are usually social interactions, and, at worst, were intended to be romantic. One remedy is to frequently remind yourself that you won't have to live with your humiliation forever because MORTALITY. Or that our perception of reality is pretty inaccurate no matter what (see: Chris Ware; the tiny stoner I quoted earlier). Or that technically — TECHNICALLY — we have no way of knowing for sure that any of this is happening AT ALL. You could also just watch Freaks and Geeks.
Last August/September, I filmed a supporting role in Enough Said, real live goddess Nicole Holofcener's recent movie. (Early readers of this blog will remember lame references to musical theater. In the words of KP, This is a part of me.) It's out in theaters now! I'm really proud of it and still shocked that I got to work with such funny, wonderful humans.

I'm not saying that you have to be perfect all the time. It's absolutely fine to make mistakes, because it's sometimes the only way for you to learn and improve your style. I encourage you to get to know yourself better, simply by exposing yourself to new styles and clothes. Experimenting and having fun with fashion is the key to evolving your style.
9. Wear lipstick. Even if your smile is more like the pursed-lip grin of Mona Lisa until you get serious about whitening your teeth or finishing your dental work, a little color energizes your face and brings attention to what you say. And if you're dashing around doing errands or working from home, lipstick may be all you need to perk up the day. Be it a rich nude caramel, sheer sandy pink, rosy tan or go-for-it red, find your best shade and forget about trends.
Fashion is a multibillion-dollar industry that has considerable impact on the way ordinary people dress and present themselves and relies heavily on media and advertising to communicate the producer's preferences and goals and influence public perception through various types of promotion; at the same time, fashion can be influenced by social change and counter-trends outside the producer, retailer or advertiser's control. As fashion is driven by trends within and without the fashion industry, fashion blogs and other "new media" outside the control of traditional establishment represent a disruptive innovation to the social dynamics of mass media and fashion consumption in modern consumer society. It is likely that the blogosphere will have a considerable long-term influence on the industry, as the number of fashion based blogs continue to grow, with increasing numbers of consumers able to create and modify the media that they consume, and traditional producers and advertisers adapting their practices to avoid dilution of their own influence. 

About - Jana Meister is a Kansas City based fashion blogger and stylist. She has spent the past several years working in the Kansas City fashion industry as a board member of Fashion Group International KC, the Fashion Editor of Kansas City Fashion Week, a freelance stylist and fashion writer for local magazine publications, and the official stylist and blogger for Summit Fair Shopping Center. She frequently appears on morning news stations including FOX 4 Morning Show, Better Kansas City, and KC LIVE sharing her knowledge of current fashion trends and style tips!
Invest In A Quality Iron: A quality iron is an absolute must to ensure you don't damage your clothes. Get one with a range of settings that can conquer even the toughest wrinkles, but gentle enough to iron over delicate fabrics. Because there are so many irons out there, the folks at Real Simple have made it easier for you to decide on one that will meet your needs. Check out their list of the top 40 irons they tried. 

Los Angeles-based wardrobe stylist and YouTube vlogger Chriselle Lim is the fashionable force behind "The Chriselle Factor," a fashion blog that provides insight into her personal fashion style. Chriselle's site covers fashion, beauty, and lifestyle topics, ranging from travel to fitness and home decor. In the Fashion section of her blog, Chriselle shares photos of the drool-worthy outfits she wears to her jaunts to Fashion Week in Paris and New York City, among other stylish points of travel. Informed by a fashion sense that's super-feminine and completely trend-obsessed, this blog is a major destination for anyone looking for up-to-the-moment fashion inspiration. More »
The versions about the origin of casual style are diverse, too. According to one, it originated in a small Scottish town Aberdeen, particularly in a football club, where everyone wore his/her name on the clothes. The fans of football and the founders of this club wanted to be different from the others and they created a unique football style, characterized by the pieces of certain brands. Further, the football fans realized that the brands were not at all important. And they started concentrating on the comfort and the harmony of the pieces that were combined and the casual style was born. According to another version, the native Scandinavian people of the countryside used this style for their combinations.
What this style absolutely excludes is anything that’s official, taken from business looks or other subcultures. All the rest is welcome. Casual style is suitable for every woman with any type of figure, which is also very important. An example of this style can be an interesting top, some minimalistic shorts, a creative handbag, and a light scarf.
How to actually do it: Strive to wear colors that enhance one another rather than "match" in the traditional sense. For an easy hack, says Minkoff, "look at a simple color wheel. The colors that are opposite each other on the wheel complement each other." (Think non-obvious but fetching combos, like orange and navy or purple and saffron.) Diversifying your accessories, in both color and texture, is another do. (A beloved trio from the vault of Betty Halbreich, a personal shopper at New York City's Bergdorf Goodman and the author of the style memoir I'll Drink to That: "A black dress, navy shoes, and a burgundy handbag.") And under no circumstances should you ever rock a suite of jewelry. Says Vazquez, " Anything that was sold together as a set looks really dated."
6. Get a new everyday hobo bag. Just say no to achy neck and shoulders, small ladylike handbags (even ones with a designer logo), heavy satchels with a zillion pockets and buckles, or changing bags day to day. Treat yourself to a medium-sized hobo of soft natural leather that's flexible enough to hold all your items — even your iPad, smartphone and Kindle — yet snuggles on your shoulder and under your arm for security in crowds, elevators and airports. It sits easily on your lap at movies, and has a full-zipper closure, inner pockets and at least one outer pocket for keys and mints.
What this style absolutely excludes is anything that’s official, taken from business looks or other subcultures. All the rest is welcome. Casual style is suitable for every woman with any type of figure, which is also very important. An example of this style can be an interesting top, some minimalistic shorts, a creative handbag, and a light scarf.
Just as we’re settling into the fall groove of checks and plaids, the Spring 2019 season has officially come to a close. And while there were a few overarching ideas to the season, there is truly a trend or a must-have item for everyone. One idea that seemed to resonate with many designers (and showgoers) was that of escapism. At Chloé, Loewe, and Paco Rabanne, the Spring 2019 girl has run off to Ibiza, where she is wearing patchwork textures and layers and using seashells and found objects as jewelry. It's the type of girl who always packs a favorite crochet dress or tie-dye T-shirt that she will throw over her maillot before heading to the beach. On the opposite end of the spectrum, we're seeing all-out '80s, an idea rooted more in the city streets and Hollywood. Eighties acid-washed denim, especially at Proenza Schouler, has officially made its comeback, as have graphic-art prints, as seen at Louis Vuitton. Animal prints are still having a major moment, as are feathers and fringe, which first made a big splash last spring. And while many are still lamenting the loss of Phoebe Philo's Céline, many labels are stepping up to fill in the void. Great suiting appeared all over the runways, including at brands where we are used to seeing more feminine pieces. The classic trench, a signature for minimalists and Philo-philes, is still a runway mainstay, and we saw many clever iterations at Riccardo Tisci's Burberry debut. But aside from a trench or a suit, the item to buy this spring is a pair of shorts. While many street-style stars got a head start on the bike-short revival we saw at Fendi, capri-length tailored shorts, as well as cargo shorts, are clearly the new skirt. For all of Spring 2019's best fashion trends, scroll below.

The blogosphere has indeed opened up many doors for the fashion industry, one of which is allowing the ordinary people to partake in the 'elite' fashion world and discuss their likes and dislikes on the way fashion is presented in the media.[6] In 2008, the Pulitzer Prize winning fashion writer and former blogger Robin Givhan, claimed that fashion blogs had democratized the fashion industry. Givhan had also written in Harpers Bazaar that 'The rise of the fashion blogger has evolved [fashion] from an aristocratic business dominated by omnipotent designers into a democratic one in which everyone has access to stylistic clothes...the average people, too often estranged from fashion, is not taking ownership of it'.[7] A similar statement was said by Constance White, the style director for E-bay and former fashion journalist, saying that the impact of the fashion blogosphere has allowed the whole population to take ownership of the fashion world, including people of all different races, genders, and social standings.[8] The Daily Mail writer Karen Kay suggested once in an interview that blogs allow anyone to both critique and praise designers, regardless of the often ‘needed’ professional opinion, with the help fashion blogs, the consumers are helping to set the trends.[9]
There are both free and premium choices for your blog’s WordPress theme, with extreme price differences, ranging from $3 to $1,000. It definitely makes sense for to sift through the free themes first, because there are so many options and you’ll get a better idea of what you want. Plus, themes are like clothes shopping; you can try the theme on to check the fit before making your selection. Most theme repositories, including WordPress’ own wordpress.org, give you the opportunity to preview a theme before downloading, installing or even paying for it.
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