Tie-dye emerged as a fashion influencer favourite for summer 2018, and it's a look that was compounded on the catwalk. No longer solely the preserve of art teachers and ageing hippies, tie-dye has had a modern update, At Dior, the brand employed its meticulous craftsmanship to the process to create kaleidoscope versions, sometimes layering tie-dye over florals. Miuccia Prada went for a flouro approach, used to reflect a liberated woman. Stella McCartney's version came in blue and white boilersuits, T-shirts and combat trousers.
Knowing your readership also helps you select the best theme. Not only will you have a better idea what to choose, but you’ll also be able to provide something that’s consistent with your industry’s standards and current trends. Conversely, if you are an extremely creative person, you could go against the grain and choose something that will set a new fashion!
Bucket hats are well and truly back. Yes, the iconic ’90s accessory is a must-have item for ’18/’19 and should undoubtedly be on your shopping list if you don’t already own one. Providing both sun protection and style, these casual and cool hats are perfect for weekend ensembles. Whether plain, patterned or featuring a logo, the brimmed hats add an on-trend edge to any outfit. Wear them with dresses, slouchy suits, overalls, and more.
"Every woman really only needs 20 core items in her closet," advises Nazarudin. "A black pair of pants, a blue blazer, a cashmere V-neck sweater in a jewel tone, and so on." Outside of these 20, you can experiment with more inexpensive items — if you don't like them, it's not nearly as bad as if you dropped $300 on a trendy piece you only wore once. If you need tips on how to maximize your basics, check out Good Housekeeping Style Director Lori Bergamotto's weeklong experiment in wearing the same thing every day.
The New York Times "Style" section writer, Eric Wilson, did an extensive study on the impact of fashion bloggers on the fashion industry for one of his style columns. Wilson wrote that these bloggers have ascended ‘from the nosebleed seats to the front row’ in the past year and that the divide between the ‘high code’ editors with a professional opinion and the ‘amateur’ fashion bloggers is beginning to disintegrate. Wilson interviewed prominent publicists, editors and designers. Publicist Kelly Cutrone stated that over the past two years, there has been a complete change in who is writing about fashion. Not only does Cutrone say she needs to keep a watch on the editors of mainstream writings, such as Vogue and Elle, but now she needs to monitor on the millions of fashion bloggers around the world. Cutrone goes on the later state that once these bloggers post anything on the internet, it never comes off, and it now becomes the first thing that the designers will see.[5]

Great Post, I chose to focus on the crowdfunding niche. It was a 2 billion dollar industry last year and is projected to be a 5 billion dollar industry this year. I recommend using Fiverr to use graphic designers for first time bloggers. I did use the logo designed for five dollars at the top of my site (bottom now) but stopped using it because it didn’t look good on mobile.
“Your makeup can make or break a great outfit so it’s important to know what works for you and what compliments your features and coloring. Contacting a professional can help you figure out how to make your makeup and clothing work together. Also know that even though many women want a ‘natural look’ it actually takes a lot of products and time to do it right.” —Brooke Baker, beauty and style consultant    These makeup mistakes can make you look sloppy.

How to actually do it: "Where your breasts sit on your chest makes a big difference in how clothes fit," says Vazquez. In other words, if you're wearing a bra that fits properly, there will be no sagging or bulging—and that means your silhouette will look trimmer from every angle. The target is midway between your elbows and shoulders. You've scored a match when "the front center panel of the bra lays flat, there's no wrinkling or gapping in the cups, and the bra is not hiking up or creating bulges," says Kristen Supulski, the director of merchandising for Vanity Fair Brands lingerie. "If you can squeeze just two fingers under the band and it still feels snug, that's the perfect fit."


Fashion’s most unflattering women’s wear trend is far from a spot in our rearview mirrors. Skintight bike shorts pedaled their way onto scores of runways once again this season, having first emerged as a ’90s throwback reference at Off-White this time last year. At Fendi, in a look sported by Bella Hadid, they were long, navy and spandex, with shimmering streaks and a matching leather waist belt. At Roberto Cavalli, Paul Surridge presented a pair for after dark, in ochre with blue sequined embroidery. Over in Paris, the first look from the new creative director at Mugler, Casey Cadwallader, was an oversize, seamed black blazer and — you guessed it — matching biking shorts. And Jacquemus opted for an unforgiving knitted tangerine variation, to be worn with an oversize white shirt and the swagger of someone comfortable with having everything on show. Saddle up! — ELIZABETH PATON, European correspondent, Styles
×