The hardest part of shopping is deciding when it’s enough. It’s more than easy to be carried away, but with a little bit of planning, you’ll be able to make it work. Start by making a list of items you need. Second step is to look for possible discounts, or some coupons you might have. However, don’t buy something just because it’s cheap – the chances you won’t put it one more than twice. Remember, cost-effective and cheap are not synonyms. It’s important to stick with your schedule, and make a type of agreement with yourself. Also, always pick quality before quantity. If you’re in doubt should you purchase an expensive item, make sure to check its lining – if you’re able to notice its quality, take it. A nice lining is a signature of designer clothes.


"My style is really minimalist. The simpler, the better. I always try to have a balance between what I'm wearing in my upper and lower body. If I'm wearing some simple jeans or a simple skirt, I try to add some scarves or lots of necklaces. If I wear lots of neck accessories I avoid using big hats and lots of bracelets. And it's the other way round: If I'm wearing some saggy jeans with a huge belt I try to keep it simple in the upper body. " —Submitted by Valeria Bernal Malek
On the flip side, this option is “free”, but is going to take more time on your end. Before you reach out to an expert for advice, make sure you do your homework. Experts are often busy people. Make sure you search if they answered the questions you want to ask before. Skim through their blogs, Twitter, check if they’ve been interviewed on a podcast or magazine. If you can’t find the answer you’re looking for, only then should you consider reaching out to them. For that, I highly recommend reading this post: “How to get the attention of your favorite expert”

A sale should never be a cue to buy something. I mean, not never, but it should not always be (which is the case for most of us). If you have been waiting for a particular product to go on sale, sure, pick it up, but if it’s a random dress you want just because it is on discount, ask yourself if you’d buy it if it wasn’t on sale. You have your answer.
10. Master getting in and out of a car. This is a move we all need to know, and it is crucial when wearing skirts or dresses. To get in a car, seat yourself first while facing the open door. Then keep your legs together and swing them in before scooting over a bit. To get out, keep your legs together and swing them out. Then grab the door and gracefully stand. 
Other than being a really strong fashion statement, you should know that a suit, and all menswear in general, is more comfortable than most women’s clothes. You shouldn’t wear anything frumpy or too baggy, that’s not the point at all. Finding a women’s suit which will fit like it’s tailored has never been easier, you’ll still feel feminine, just a dash more powerful.
The blogosphere has indeed opened up many doors for the fashion industry, one of which is allowing the ordinary people to partake in the 'elite' fashion world and discuss their likes and dislikes on the way fashion is presented in the media.[6] In 2008, the Pulitzer Prize winning fashion writer and former blogger Robin Givhan, claimed that fashion blogs had democratized the fashion industry. Givhan had also written in Harpers Bazaar that 'The rise of the fashion blogger has evolved [fashion] from an aristocratic business dominated by omnipotent designers into a democratic one in which everyone has access to stylistic clothes...the average people, too often estranged from fashion, is not taking ownership of it'.[7] A similar statement was said by Constance White, the style director for E-bay and former fashion journalist, saying that the impact of the fashion blogosphere has allowed the whole population to take ownership of the fashion world, including people of all different races, genders, and social standings.[8] The Daily Mail writer Karen Kay suggested once in an interview that blogs allow anyone to both critique and praise designers, regardless of the often ‘needed’ professional opinion, with the help fashion blogs, the consumers are helping to set the trends.[9]
Dress Your Age: Janice Dickinson doesn't look 57, but she is. We're not going to lie, she looks great, but let's face it, it's a tad tacky when 50-somethings try sporting an outfit you'd normally find on 20-somethings — and vice versa. However, tinsel town allows celebrities more leeway than the real world does for us ordinary folk. As a rule of thumb, stick to age appropriate attire.
Work Out Stylishly: Come on, let's be serious, the gym can be an intimidating place with so many buff, sweaty bods. We'd be lying if we didn't say we never wore mascara before lacing up. But hitting the gym shouldn't make you fret. It should make you feel good. Getting some trendy workout clothes that fit your body will make you feel more confident and encourage you to break a sweat.
Milliner Gigi Burris O’Hara is known for adding the most delicate details to her intricate hats, so she knows a thing or two about pulling together an outfit with panache. “Looking put together is very different than having it all together, it just takes a bit of mindfulness,” Burris O’Hara pointed out. “Make sure your shoes are shined and put on a hat—immediately you’ll look done.”
About - Described as "The authority on Miami fashion" by GUESS. Ria counts brands like Revolve Clothing, Bacardi, Teen Vogue, Kia, and Wildfox Couture, amongst her list of clients. She has been featured in prestigious publications such as Elle Magazine, Marie Claire, Seventeen and more. Ria aims to inspire by documenting her journey as it comes and captivating audiences all over the world.
Nothing comes back the same way, and the jumpsuit of 2017 is not necessarily the same as a version from the '70s. Check out the difference in Raquel Welch's and Tilda Swinton's jumpsuits. There are subtle design tweaks that make any revival slightly different from the original. Does that piece from your "archive" really work now? Ask a trusted friend for a second opinion.
There was a refreshing shift on the runways this season, and it had little to do with the clothes and everything to do with the casting. While plenty of new faces graced the catwalks as usual, the real surprise was the reappearance of some of the greatest models of the ’90s. Yasmin Le Bon walked at Calvin Klein, Stella Tennant and Georgina Grenville starred at Ferragamo, and Shalom Harlow — who hasn’t set foot on the runway in years — closed Versace (in a floral lace gown and a cloud of her natural ringlets). These women added to the shows a kind of diversity that has been lacking: a range of ages. They also lent strength to the collections, thanks in part to their walks: the powerful, showstopping strides of the original supermodels. — MALINA JOSEPH GILCHRIST, style director, women’s, T magazine
In a study conducted through the Biz360 Community, it was found that over 53% of the New York City Fashion Week converge had come from online articles and fashion blogs. While a vast portion of what was written in these blogs came from various mainstream fashion resource magazine and newspaper articles, such as Coutorture and New York Magazine, these fashion blogs provided a larger viewing and reading audience for the fashion week.[13]
The constant search for New! and More Original! and Never-Used-Before-for-a-Show venues can drive designers to some obscure places, and pretty risky choices. This season that meant a plethora of shows held en plein-air, unpredictable weather patterns be damned. In New York, rain poured down on Telfar’s show at the Blade helipad on 34th street (and a temporary tarp erected above guests’ heads blew away); it dripped off the umbrellas into attendees’ legs in the Marble Cemetery garden in the East Village at Rodarte, as well as onto the tulle dresses sprinkled among the roses; and it misted over the benches placed outside the original frame houses at the Weeksville Heritage Center, a historic Brooklyn site commemorating one of the first free African-American communities of the 19th century, where Kerby Jean-Raymond set his Pyer Moss show.
You might accurately describe Alyson Walsh as the Alexa Chung of her generation: She prefers wearing a good pair of jeans and a T-shirt over anything too fussy. She writes that she started her blog, That's Not My Age, with one mission: "I've always strongly believed that you don't have to have youth to have style, and I wanted to share ideas and celebrate inspirational women (and men) of all ages."
“There are so many trend pieces, online articles, news snippets, and magazine blurbs about what the next ‘it’ things are or what things you ‘should never be seen in again.’ All that is propaganda. True personal style is that which looks great to the outside world but makes the wearer feel even greater inside. If you are confident in your style, it will project beauty no matter what you’re wearing.” —Stephen V Hernandez, a personal stylist based out of NYC  
The New York-based Eadie, 29, is best known for her accessible, yet educated, approach to fashion. Based in San Francisco when she launched the blog, Eadie has worked as a merchandiser for brands like Gap and Tory Burch, which means she has a professional edge when it comes to outfit posts. And brands like love working with her because she has a reputation for converting readers into shoppers. 
Less Really Is More: Indecent exposure isn't classy. Celebrity stylist Jen Rade, who has dressed many beauties including Angelina Jolie, told In Style that only one body part should be exposed at a time. If you're baring your decolletage, don't also show off your legs. Remember ladies, a little bit of mystery is alluring. Some things are better left to the imagination. Source: In Style
Just as we’re settling into the fall groove of checks and plaids, the Spring 2019 season has officially come to a close. And while there were a few overarching ideas to the season, there is truly a trend or a must-have item for everyone. One idea that seemed to resonate with many designers (and showgoers) was that of escapism. At Chloé, Loewe, and Paco Rabanne, the Spring 2019 girl has run off to Ibiza, where she is wearing patchwork textures and layers and using seashells and found objects as jewelry. It's the type of girl who always packs a favorite crochet dress or tie-dye T-shirt that she will throw over her maillot before heading to the beach. On the opposite end of the spectrum, we're seeing all-out '80s, an idea rooted more in the city streets and Hollywood. Eighties acid-washed denim, especially at Proenza Schouler, has officially made its comeback, as have graphic-art prints, as seen at Louis Vuitton. Animal prints are still having a major moment, as are feathers and fringe, which first made a big splash last spring. And while many are still lamenting the loss of Phoebe Philo's Céline, many labels are stepping up to fill in the void. Great suiting appeared all over the runways, including at brands where we are used to seeing more feminine pieces. The classic trench, a signature for minimalists and Philo-philes, is still a runway mainstay, and we saw many clever iterations at Riccardo Tisci's Burberry debut. But aside from a trench or a suit, the item to buy this spring is a pair of shorts. While many street-style stars got a head start on the bike-short revival we saw at Fendi, capri-length tailored shorts, as well as cargo shorts, are clearly the new skirt. For all of Spring 2019's best fashion trends, scroll below.
Why: Kavita’s been blogging for several years now and it’s been amazing to watch her star rise, from her #OOTD shots as a sixteen year old through to a Coachella VIP frolicking with celebrities. Her bold colourful looks are a great blend of both high street and luxury, though she’s got a soft spot for a Gucci bag – a girl after our own heart, basically.
About Blog Fashion Talks, produced in partnership with CAFA, is a podcast that observes the world through the lens of fashion. Join host Donna Bishop as she interviews designers, stylists, industry insiders and even those outside fashion to reveal insights, observations, personal stories and historical moments on how fashion helps to shape the world we live in and how our world shapes fashion and the clothes we wear.
"Unless you know someone’s gonna see it, it's best to wear something that flatters you and creates the best shape possible. There’s nothing more unsightly than a visible panty line or quad boob, and proper underwear means you don’t have to worry about anything falling out! Also there’s not much worse than the look or the feeling of a too-small bra, and I would know, what with wearing a 34DD all my life and then finding I should have been wearing a 30H!" —Submitted by jessicarosehailes
This is where you should start – there’s no room for change if you don’t make it yourself. Open up your closet and take a good look at your clothes. You should ask yourself one simple question – if you were in a store right now, what items from your closet would you buy? It’s a very simple and quite efficient game you should play once in a while. If you want to stop spending hours in front of your closet, it needs to be neat and color coordinated – hoarding clothes always leads to a mess. All clothes you decide need to go shouldn’t be thrown away – donate them! That way, you’ll feel good about it.
The blogosphere has indeed opened up many doors for the fashion industry, one of which is allowing the ordinary people to partake in the 'elite' fashion world and discuss their likes and dislikes on the way fashion is presented in the media.[6] In 2008, the Pulitzer Prize winning fashion writer and former blogger Robin Givhan, claimed that fashion blogs had democratized the fashion industry. Givhan had also written in Harpers Bazaar that 'The rise of the fashion blogger has evolved [fashion] from an aristocratic business dominated by omnipotent designers into a democratic one in which everyone has access to stylistic clothes...the average people, too often estranged from fashion, is not taking ownership of it'.[7] A similar statement was said by Constance White, the style director for E-bay and former fashion journalist, saying that the impact of the fashion blogosphere has allowed the whole population to take ownership of the fashion world, including people of all different races, genders, and social standings.[8] The Daily Mail writer Karen Kay suggested once in an interview that blogs allow anyone to both critique and praise designers, regardless of the often ‘needed’ professional opinion, with the help fashion blogs, the consumers are helping to set the trends.[9]

“I don’t recommend buying a highly trendy item for a lot of money because in just a few months it’s almost guaranteed to be on the ‘OUT’ list next year. One example this season are the embellished handbags. These fun bags with stars, hearts, moons, and beading can be super fun for some nights out but really shouldn’t be a big part of your fashion budget. I’d look to stores like Zara or Topshop for great versions at an affordable price.” —Mr. Hernandez
Now that you know your area of expertise, it is time to select a unique yet memorable website URL. While some blogs opt to infuse their URL with relevant keywords, this is less of a concern for your fashion blog. It is not that keywords are not relevant, just that keywords in fashion come and go faster than in most industries—and you don’t want your blogs name to appear dated. 
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