Why: Since stumbling across this gorgeous blog, our lives have been so much more colourful. Jess goes beyond the standard #OOTD posts and her site’s a sartorial treasure trove full of styling advice, galleries and even some tips for budding bloggers if you’re thinking of making this list some day. Her masterfully saturated and unique photography is what sets her apart from the rest of the pack and we still can’t stop thinking about her guide to wearing colour this spring…
Sporty surf looks were prevalent throughout the season. Perhaps the most major runway moment was at up-and-coming designer Marine Serre’s show, where she created couturelike looks out of neoprene commonly used for wetsuits. Also picking up on this surf trend was CALVIN KLEIN 205W39NYC, with a scuba-inspired ensemble, and Etro, where the model even toted around a printed surfboard. The surf look was even given a luxe makeover by Hermès, where a neoprene swimsuit was layered under a chic leather skirt.
“Not enough people have heard of decision fatigue. Decision fatigue is the result of making too many decisions during the course of the day. All of these little decisions add up and actually drain the brain of decision-making power later on. So don’t waste your brainpower in the morning trying to get dressed. Instead get rid of things you can’t or don’t wear regularly and simplify your wardrobe to pieces you like. Keep your clothing simple, so you will have the energy to tackle life’s tougher problems.” —Dan Moyer Jr., stylist and national director of social media for Closet Factory   You should finally get rid of these articles of clothing and accessories in your closet.

A less strict style, which can also be used for business looks, combining the details of elegant and everyday styles is smart-casual. Giorgio Armani is believed to be the founder of this style, having shown the ways on how to add weightlessness and effortlessness to business looks. Other characteristic features of this style are the garments like comfy jumpers toping strict shirts with the unbuttoned top, etc. You can also cuff the sleeves and use a variety of accessories for complementing the looks including scarfs, earrings, or anything else, not being afraid of opting for bold color and design solutions.
“Fashion” is a broad term used to describe many genres of clothing and accessories. Before you get started it is essential to select your area of expertise. This needs to be more detailed than writing a blog that appeals to men, women, teens, or children—but instead, you must focus on a specific niche within the industry. The area of expertise you select will be used to help create your marketing strategy, website URL, and website design. For example, you could select:
Speaking of rules, we should mentioned those regarding showing skin. It’s pretty simple – show one body part at a time. So if you’re showing your cleavage, pay attention you’re not combining that with miniskirts, and the other way around. Looking and feeling attractive shouldn’t be based on how naked you are. A little bit of mystery is always a nice touch.
What this style absolutely excludes is anything that’s official, taken from business looks or other subcultures. All the rest is welcome. Casual style is suitable for every woman with any type of figure, which is also very important. An example of this style can be an interesting top, some minimalistic shorts, a creative handbag, and a light scarf.
Today I am 20. The Crucible, in which I play Mary Warren, opened at the Walter Kerr Theatre three weeks ago, March 31st—also the eight-year anniversary of this blog. I have a lot of trouble comprehending that writing Style Rookie led to writing for other places, then starting Rookie, then being able to audition for plays that I love and to be inside of them for long periods of time, which is an inexplicably wonderful way to live a life. But I am really really really insanely thankful for all of it, and many of you have followed for a LONG time, and that means a lot. Right now, I'm very slowly writing something that I hope will effectively articulate the strangeness of the way these all overlap—the fictions we get to try on via diary/blog-keeping, and acting, and personal style. But that's a longterm hermit project. I just wanted to mention it because in my attempt to briefly list recent stuff I've been up to, I may sound callous, but: None of this goes unexamined or unappreciated. 

The constant search for New! and More Original! and Never-Used-Before-for-a-Show venues can drive designers to some obscure places, and pretty risky choices. This season that meant a plethora of shows held en plein-air, unpredictable weather patterns be damned. In New York, rain poured down on Telfar’s show at the Blade helipad on 34th street (and a temporary tarp erected above guests’ heads blew away); it dripped off the umbrellas into attendees’ legs in the Marble Cemetery garden in the East Village at Rodarte, as well as onto the tulle dresses sprinkled among the roses; and it misted over the benches placed outside the original frame houses at the Weeksville Heritage Center, a historic Brooklyn site commemorating one of the first free African-American communities of the 19th century, where Kerby Jean-Raymond set his Pyer Moss show.
Dress Your Age: Janice Dickinson doesn't look 57, but she is. We're not going to lie, she looks great, but let's face it, it's a tad tacky when 50-somethings try sporting an outfit you'd normally find on 20-somethings — and vice versa. However, tinsel town allows celebrities more leeway than the real world does for us ordinary folk. As a rule of thumb, stick to age appropriate attire.
“Fashion shows are for transporting people,” Balenciaga designer Demna Gvasalia told Vogue this season, “otherwise there’s no point.” His show was one of the season’s most surreal transports. He compared working on a collection presentation to working on a movie, and in fact, it was Luc Besson’s studio on the outskirts of Paris where he held his show, in a digital tunnel that dripped, melted and swooped through a simulated reality. It was the work of the digital artist Jon Rafman, whom Gvasalia had met at Art Basel, and the effect was practically mind-melting, a digi-dystopia for an elegant but surreal collection.
Don't Buy Trends That Don't Suit Your Body Type: There are trends that we say 'I could never wear that' because it's too bold or daring, but there are also trends that we see and instantly know that they aren't for our body type. No matter what people say about being able to pull anything off if you have confidence, if you see something and don't think it will work for you, it probably won't.

WHAT YOU CAN DO TODAY: Go to a store that you would consider out of your budget. A place that might even be uncomfortably expensive for you. You don’t have to buy anything. Just walk around, touch the clothes. Maybe even try something on. Make mental note of how things fit, feel, and how you feel wearing it. Then go to a fast fashion shop like Zara or H&M and try similar items on. Make note of what’s different and what’s similar. Anything surprising?
Other recent developments: I was on the cover of magnificent, ad-free The Great Discontent, as well as New York Magazine and Nylon. This is Our Youth playwright Kenneth Lonergan wrote something about me for Vanity Fair, and Annie Leibovitz took the accompanying photo in the same backyard where I used to take pictures every day after school for this blog. Here I am babbling on about all this lunacy:
Well, do you agree or disagree with me on this subject? I certainly have rather strong opinions on this, but it comes from years of seeing women unfortunately undermine themselves professionally by presenting themselves in a less than professional manner, stylishly speaking. So, as I mentioned, think of your outward aesthetic as an extension of your personal brand. Make the mark you want to leave when you come into contact with someone.
“Fashion” is a broad term used to describe many genres of clothing and accessories. Before you get started it is essential to select your area of expertise. This needs to be more detailed than writing a blog that appeals to men, women, teens, or children—but instead, you must focus on a specific niche within the industry. The area of expertise you select will be used to help create your marketing strategy, website URL, and website design. For example, you could select:
About - I started this blog because I love clothes – thats obvious, right? I think that clothes and fashion are the best way to express yourself. An outfit says a lot more about a person than you’d think. I love sharing my daily outfits & makeup with all of you! I love to shop and I may or may not have a shopping problem (yikes!) but I figured I could at least turn that into something positive – by sharing my favorite fashion items with you!
Fashion is a multibillion-dollar industry that has considerable impact on the way ordinary people dress and present themselves and relies heavily on media and advertising to communicate the producer's preferences and goals and influence public perception through various types of promotion; at the same time, fashion can be influenced by social change and counter-trends outside the producer, retailer or advertiser's control. As fashion is driven by trends within and without the fashion industry, fashion blogs and other "new media" outside the control of traditional establishment represent a disruptive innovation to the social dynamics of mass media and fashion consumption in modern consumer society. It is likely that the blogosphere will have a considerable long-term influence on the industry, as the number of fashion based blogs continue to grow, with increasing numbers of consumers able to create and modify the media that they consume, and traditional producers and advertisers adapting their practices to avoid dilution of their own influence.
Think quality over quantity. When shopping, pay attention to the materials and craftsmanship of the garments you purchase. Then once you buy quality items, take proper care of them. Have them tailored, have them professionally cleaned regularly as needed, hang them on velvet hangers (just say no to wire hangers!), take your shoes to a cobbler when they need to be polished or resoled. Basic care will go a long way in extending the life of your clothes and shoes!

About - Jana Meister is a Kansas City based fashion blogger and stylist. She has spent the past several years working in the Kansas City fashion industry as a board member of Fashion Group International KC, the Fashion Editor of Kansas City Fashion Week, a freelance stylist and fashion writer for local magazine publications, and the official stylist and blogger for Summit Fair Shopping Center. She frequently appears on morning news stations including FOX 4 Morning Show, Better Kansas City, and KC LIVE sharing her knowledge of current fashion trends and style tips!


Blogger Krystal Bick is the woman behind "This Time Tomorrow," a fashion blog that covers style, travel, art, dating, and other topics related to living in New York City. A transplanted West Coaster, Krystal's fashion vibe is a true blend of East and West coast American style (or you could say, girlfriend meets boyfriend style). Her looks tend to gravitate toward classic, tailored pieces inspired by menswear, but often with feminine and quirky accents thrown in, such as a pair of cropped patterned trousers, a silky blouse, high heel pumps, and an over-sized men's watch. More »
The 27-year-old Italian, who now lives in Los Angeles, has the broadest reach of any individual fashion blogger on our list, with more than 3 million Instagram followers. She's a global star, as popular in Europe as she is in the U.S. What's more, links from her site drive traffic and conversions, according to many of the brands with whom she has partnered. She was also recently named to an expert panel that will help determine the shortlist for 2015's LVMH Prize. Oh, and she graced the cover of Lucky magazine's February issue along with fellow bloggers Nicole Warne and Zanita Whittington. 

“Don’t go out and purchase all the latest trends if they are not flattering or don’t go with your personal style. Your style is about taking what is out there and combining it in unique ways that express who you are. It is not about being a clone and looking like everyone else. So don’t take the rules too seriously.” —Diane Pollack, a personal style curator and wardrobe consultant in NYC   Learn some secrets you never knew about your own clothes.


It's a little awkward, so we'll get straight to the point: This Thursday we humbly ask you to protect Wikipedia's independence. We depend on donations averaging about $16.36, but 99% of our readers don't give. If everyone reading this gave $3, we could keep Wikipedia thriving for years to come. The price of your Thursday coffee is all we need. When we made Wikipedia a non-profit, people warned us we'd regret it. But if Wikipedia became commercial, it would be a great loss to the world. Wikipedia is a place to learn, not a place for advertising. It unites all of us who love knowledge: contributors, readers and the donors who keep us thriving. The heart and soul of Wikipedia is a community of people working to bring you unlimited access to reliable, neutral information. Please take a minute to help us keep Wikipedia growing. Thank you.

When in your dashboard, you will see a Bluehost button located in the upper left corner. After clicking on this button, you will be prompted with various tools that can be used for blog customization. These are the only tools you will need to customize your blog, so change what you want and when finished press the launch button to complete your blog.
If you’re anything like me, one of your favorite pasttimes, amongst Netflix bingeing and cake baking, is looking at fashion blogs and borderline-stalking bloggers on their websites and social media accounts for outfit inspo. This is a great and enjoyable hobby to have, but can be disheartening if you’re a college student and can barely afford a Venti Starbucks, much less a Valentino purse. Most fashion blogs seem to be full of designer accessories and expensive jeans. But style is style, regardless of the price tag or brand, and whether you spend $5 or $500 on sunglasses, fashion is for all of us.
How to actually do it: "Figure out your go-to, foolproof looks," says designer Nanette Lepore, then seek out variations on that theme. Stumped? Picture the outfits that you feel most comfortable in. Or ask people close to you what you look best in. Once you've zeroed in on what works, find different takes. "I gravitate toward jackets, so I'll do a bomber style, then a silk version, or a denim jacket with leather sleeves," says Minkoff. "Whenever you feel the need to talk yourself into things, that's a red flag that you shouldn't buy them," says Minkoff. If you have doubts in the dressing room, it may help to take a photo of yourself in the item, suggests Aerin Lauder, the founder and creative director of the lifestyle brand Aerin. "It's much more accurate than looking in the mirror."
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