How to actually do it: "Figure out your go-to, foolproof looks," says designer Nanette Lepore, then seek out variations on that theme. Stumped? Picture the outfits that you feel most comfortable in. Or ask people close to you what you look best in. Once you've zeroed in on what works, find different takes. "I gravitate toward jackets, so I'll do a bomber style, then a silk version, or a denim jacket with leather sleeves," says Minkoff. "Whenever you feel the need to talk yourself into things, that's a red flag that you shouldn't buy them," says Minkoff. If you have doubts in the dressing room, it may help to take a photo of yourself in the item, suggests Aerin Lauder, the founder and creative director of the lifestyle brand Aerin. "It's much more accurate than looking in the mirror."


Why: The leggy blonde provides a tres chic mix of outfit inspiration – her personal style definitely has that insouciant French vibe – and trend and brand lowdowns. The ‘boutique’ section of her site is a one-stop shop for the pieces she loves – and we also like the fact she has regular wardrobe clearouts via Vestiaire so true Camille-alikes can snap up her actual clothes…
About Blog Kat Tanita is one of the fastest rising fashion and travel influencers in the world. While working in the fashion industry, Kat began blogging as a creative outlet – sharing her personal, style, beauty, and travel musings on With Love From Kat. She has been featured in numerous publications including Elle, Harper’s Bazaar, Marie Claire, and The Wall Street Journal.

The segment of bloggers in their 30s, 40s, 50s, and beyond may be small, but it's mighty. We aim to enlighten you, dear reader, about the ladies of all ages who are killing the fashion-blogging game at the moment—from the 25-year-old whippersnappers to the 65-year-olds who've been at it for a good while longer. Prepare to be majorly inspired by all the women showing off their unique (and frankly, fun) looks. Keep scrolling to meet the best fashion bloggers of every age group! 

"Well, really, our memories are all we have, and even those we think of as "real" are made up. Art can condense experience into something greater than reality, and it can also give us permission to do or think certain things that otherwise we’ve avoided or felt ashamed of. The imagination is where reality lives; it’s the instant lie of backwash from the prow of that boat that we think of as cutting the present moment, everything following it becoming less and less "factual" but no less real than what we think of as having actually occurred."
How to actually do it: "Don't give people too many things to look at all at once," says Halbreich. "If you're wearing a low-cut dress, focus on the cleavage—you don't also need bare arms and legs." The concept applies to fit as well: A body-hugging dress is better with a more sensible neckline and hem, whereas a skirt that hits a few inches above the knee won't raise eyebrows if it's flared rather than tight.
This style is practically impossible to imagine without our fave denim pieces. The reason is that denim is practical and comfortable. For instance, you can put on skinny jeans with a short tunic or a light blouse with romantic flare design, of course, not forgetting about the fact that this style doesn’t absolutely bear glamorous details like beads, glitter, or rhinestones.

In the past years, American Express has become increasingly involved in New York City Fashion Week, and in 2010 American Express sponsored Evolving Influence, the first international bloggers conference in New York City. During the conference, many surveys and studies took place about the usefulness and tactics used in fashion blogs. During the study it was found that bloggers are more comfortable reporting in real-time and incorporating social tools in their opinions of runway trends and designers. After Fashion Week, it was found that 6.37% of all articles written about or related to Fashion Week had mentioned the Evolving Influence main sponsor, American Express. These blogs were not directly paid to mention American Express, so they served as a free source of advertisement for American Express.[13]
How to actually do it: Strive to wear colors that enhance one another rather than "match" in the traditional sense. For an easy hack, says Minkoff, "look at a simple color wheel. The colors that are opposite each other on the wheel complement each other." (Think non-obvious but fetching combos, like orange and navy or purple and saffron.) Diversifying your accessories, in both color and texture, is another do. (A beloved trio from the vault of Betty Halbreich, a personal shopper at New York City's Bergdorf Goodman and the author of the style memoir I'll Drink to That: "A black dress, navy shoes, and a burgundy handbag.") And under no circumstances should you ever rock a suite of jewelry. Says Vazquez, " Anything that was sold together as a set looks really dated."
I'm not saying that you have to be perfect all the time. It's absolutely fine to make mistakes, because it's sometimes the only way for you to learn and improve your style. I encourage you to get to know yourself better, simply by exposing yourself to new styles and clothes. Experimenting and having fun with fashion is the key to evolving your style.
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