References: Zoltan Torey copes with blindness by reconstructing reality in his head. Wes Anderson called Moonrise Kingdom a "memory of a fantasy," and envisioned the whole "These Days" scene from The Royal Tenenbaums when he first heard the song, building the rest of the movie around that moment (I have no source for this, a friend told me, I'll choose to believe it's true). I also wrote a bit about this in relation to The Virgin Suicides here.
I have been thinking a lot lately about what validates an emotion/event/observation, makes me feel like it really happened and I really lived it, and this seems like the right occasion to word-vomit these ideas. (Plus, I miss having time to keep this thing going, and I do feel an obligation to people who have read my blog for a long time that is not unlike the unspoken understanding you have with your first best friend, the one who watched you like stupid bands and stupid people and embarrass yourself and cry a lot, whose insight into whatever you do from now on is shaped by a unique knowledge of all the ties which bind New You to Old You, and who refrains from bringing up in front of new acquaintances that time you were on the 8th grade hip-hop team in the interest of letting you become more of yourself. In other words, we had a time, but there's so much time ahead, and it is, somehow, at the same time, quickly running out.)
I keep a list in the back of one of my journals called "Moments of Strange Magic." It contains events that were either (a) just really, really happy (jumping around to Beyoncé with friends) or (b) aesthetically cohesive and perfect and synesthetic (driving through the desert in a blue convertible to Nancy Sinatra's "Bang Bang" past a bunch of neon-sign motels and trailer parks). Each event is marked with a symbol indicating whether it took place in real life, a movie/TV show/book, or my imagination. Examples of some imagined (b) ones would be: sweaty teens in shiny pastels dancing in unison at a wood-paneled, tinsel-covered community-center room to "Snowqueen of Texas" by the Mamas and the Papas; a view from the side of a guy walking down a school hallway to Frank Ocean's "Forrest Gump," passing lockers painted in the 1970s and a ton of muted, rowdy students; a girl submerging her head into a tub of red hair dye to the chorus of St. Vincent's "Cheerleader."
Photo by @roseolm of #thecruciblebroadway opening night bow. I am so proud of and moved by everyone in this show, night after night, and thrilled for any audience member who gets to see what they've all brought to characters I thought I knew well enough from English class. My heart is very full right now!!! This was Thursday, 3/31, which is also the date of my first Style Rookie post 8 years ago. What a bizarre course of events. Thank you for following them, reading, watching--I hope you can catch this one too. ❤
Why: Hailing from Sao Paulo, Helena Bordon is one of Brazil’s most influential style bloggers. She started her fashion education from a young age courtesy of her mother, Donata Meirelles, the style director of Vogue Brazil. When Helena was just 7 years old, she’d join her mum at all the top fashion shows and eventually interned at Valentino. Now, Helena is co-founder of Brazilian high street fashion chain 284, as well as finding the time to run her eponymous blog, helenabordon.com, which offers Helena’s insider style, travel and beauty tips. Disclaimer: expect holiday envy.
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“I don’t recommend buying a highly trendy item for a lot of money because in just a few months it’s almost guaranteed to be on the ‘OUT’ list next year. One example this season are the embellished handbags. These fun bags with stars, hearts, moons, and beading can be super fun for some nights out but really shouldn’t be a big part of your fashion budget. I’d look to stores like Zara or Topshop for great versions at an affordable price.” —Mr. Hernandez
When In Doubt, Overdress: There's nothing worse than showing up an event underdressed. Maybe the invite didn't specify or involved the word 'casual' -- but everyone else dressed up not so casually. If you don't know what the dress code is, overdress. There's no harm in looking too pulled together, but you'll feel uncomfortable if you think you look out of place.

You know how some people simply know how to wear the right clothes? There’s no mystery there, and actually, you could pull it off, too, by just thinking about what you’re wearing a little bit more. It all depends on how your body is built – you should tend to accent your features in the right way. For example, wearing V neck will make your torso look longer, and wearing nude pups will do miracles for the length of your legs. Embrace your shape and learn to love all its imperfections.
Dylan Suarez of Color Me Nana stresses the importance of your reader-base. “Keep a conversation going with other bloggers out there,” she suggests. “Click on the comments on the blogs you like and research new people in the community you don’t know,” adding, “If you like the content, leave a comment! Or send an email. It’s all a domino effect. Blogging is very much built on community and conversation, so that has to be the main focus.”
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Continuing in our annual-ish tradition, today we're releasing our 2015 ranking of the most influential personal style bloggers in the world. This list looks wildly different than it did in 2013. Here's why. For one, we excluded every blogger who has expanded her empire to the point that the blog is no longer only about her. (Leandra Medine, Garance Dore and Emily Weiss fall into this category.) We also chose to focus on those who write more about personal style than anything else. (That means leaving out lifestyle and photography bloggers.) We took more international bloggers into consideration, since the Internet is global and all. And we narrowed it down to blogs that cover womenswear more regularly than menswear. 
Dress Your Age: Janice Dickinson doesn't look 57, but she is. We're not going to lie, she looks great, but let's face it, it's a tad tacky when 50-somethings try sporting an outfit you'd normally find on 20-somethings — and vice versa. However, tinsel town allows celebrities more leeway than the real world does for us ordinary folk. As a rule of thumb, stick to age appropriate attire.
About Blog My name is Bisma from New York and the Author and Editor of this blog. I love everything related to beauty and fashion and my blog is just a mean to share my way of style with the world. My blog is all about Fashion and Beauty. You will find product reviews on makeup, skincare and occasional hair/body care products along with the outfit posts, latest fashion trends and news.
“Don’t be intimidated by fashion! Fashion is supposed to be fun and happy, not to cause stress. The key to finding personal style is to list—yes, write them down—items that make you feel comfortable and confident and the things that make you feel uncomfortable or just not yourself. The latter group? Don’t wear them! Not matter how trendy they are.” —Mr. Hernandez
About Blog Extra Petite is a fashion and lifestyle blog by Jean that provides styling ideas and shopping information. This blog also aims to share fashion suggestions and solutions for women who want to look stylish and feel confident at any height or size. Her style is still very office friendly most of the time, while also being very colourful and on-trend. 

Fashion has always loved a showman. This season, however, the “experiential show” — in which design houses collaborate with artists, musicians, dancers or directors to present blockbuster catwalk spectacles — was more popular than ever before. Inspired by dance and movement, Maria Grazia Chiuri’s sixth ready-to-wear collection for Dior was unveiled in Paris by models who wove their way around eight twirling dancers on a 164-meter-square stage, part of a dazzling performance choreographed by Sharon Eyal. At Gucci, Alessandro Michele had Jane Birkin serenade the crowd midway through the show with a rendition of “Baby Alone in Babylone” at the Théâtre Le Palace. And in Milan, Giorgio Armani asked the ’90s British heartthrob Robbie Williams to croon his greatest hits to an audience of thousands at the Emporio Armani show, held in a giant hangar at Linate airport. — E.P.
The OG fashion blogger and best friend of Fashion Toast's Rumi Neely, the New York-based, Philippines-bred Bryan Grey Yambao has transformed from an online-diary keeper to a celebrity and fashion insider. While other bloggers from his era have fallen off the map, Yambao, 32, has remained relevant by branching out. Memorable projects include a collection with furrier Adrienne Landau and a hosting spot on several seasons of "America's Next Top Model."
9. Wear lipstick. Even if your smile is more like the pursed-lip grin of Mona Lisa until you get serious about whitening your teeth or finishing your dental work, a little color energizes your face and brings attention to what you say. And if you're dashing around doing errands or working from home, lipstick may be all you need to perk up the day. Be it a rich nude caramel, sheer sandy pink, rosy tan or go-for-it red, find your best shade and forget about trends.
Other recent developments: I was on the cover of magnificent, ad-free The Great Discontent, as well as New York Magazine and Nylon. This is Our Youth playwright Kenneth Lonergan wrote something about me for Vanity Fair, and Annie Leibovitz took the accompanying photo in the same backyard where I used to take pictures every day after school for this blog. Here I am babbling on about all this lunacy: 

There was a refreshing shift on the runways this season, and it had little to do with the clothes and everything to do with the casting. While plenty of new faces graced the catwalks as usual, the real surprise was the reappearance of some of the greatest models of the ’90s. Yasmin Le Bon walked at Calvin Klein, Stella Tennant and Georgina Grenville starred at Ferragamo, and Shalom Harlow — who hasn’t set foot on the runway in years — closed Versace (in a floral lace gown and a cloud of her natural ringlets). These women added to the shows a kind of diversity that has been lacking: a range of ages. They also lent strength to the collections, thanks in part to their walks: the powerful, showstopping strides of the original supermodels. — MALINA JOSEPH GILCHRIST, style director, women’s, T magazine

"Reflecting and archiving is not the same as dwelling in the past. It is not anti-living, but a part of life, even a crucial one. We do this to highlight one thing above others, so that a special moment can take up more space in our brains than an inconsequential one; so that, by plain math, our personal worlds contain more good things and fewer bad ones. Or more interesting things and fewer blah ones, since you have to record the bad, too."
Turn your calculator on, since this step is all about your payment options. You can choose the 12-month account plan for the lowest price or you might want to consider making a longer commitment. The other two hosting packages will last you twice or thrice the time, and your monthly fee will be lower! As for the rest of the boxes, you can leave them unchecked for now if you want, and return to them when the need occurs.
You know how sometimes you just know things, but don’t realize that you do until someone mentions it out loud. That’s just the case with fashion too, and that’s why we always need tips from experts, fashionistas, and designers to validate what we know. But, often while reading about stuff, we realize how we miss tiny details and how other people have a different perspective to offer! Like they say, the devil is in the details. If you were wishing that it’d be nice to have a list that states it all out for you, we’ve got you covered. So, today, let’s take a look at 50 Fashion Tips that will come in handy for every girl – whether you are a college chica or a lady boss. Ready? Let’s do this.
There aren’t many redeeming factors about living through really cold weather fashion wise, but it is the only time during the year that you can wear fur (or faux fur, of course). So just have fun with it! You can wear fur with just about anything to give your outfit an instant upgrade. Unvest in a statement fur topper, throw on a fur vest or stole over your winter coat, or find cool fur accent pieces like fur collars or even fur mittens to liven up your winter outfits.
Mason, who writes a monthly column for Marie Claire and designed her own collection for Modcloth last fall, is one of the most in-demand bloggers working right now. The 29-year-old writer played a role in the promotion and social media around Target's new plus-size collection Ava & Viv and is also a budding TV personality, offering style advice on programs including "Today" and "Good Morning America." Mason is notable because she uses her blog as a platform to discuss bigger social issues, including race, sexuality and body image. 

For the 2016 Pirelli Calendar, Annie Leibovitz chose to photograph women whose achievements demonstrate a different kind of beauty from what the calendar has traditionally showcased. I'm still shocked to be included among so many people who've long influenced not just my work, but how I see the world, and try to see myself. Annie photographed me one year earlier in the pink velvet dress I'd originally bought for prom, in my parents' backyard. At that time, it was still my backyard, too, and had functioned since I was a little kid as a personal photo studio, study, and consistent reminder that I was bigger than I had been the year before, and the year before that, and that this would only keep happening. (I'm still v short, but: relatively speaking.) It was where I learned that as your childhood shrinks around you, so will your sense of wonder, unless you choose to pay close attention to what surrounds you at new heights. When Annie shot me for Pirelli, we were just a few blocks from my new home in NYC. A lot happens in that first year, and not knowing the geography of the city makes every encounter feel totally isolated from the rest of the world, like a castle on a cloud. At the time of this shoot, I was parsing what in this year had seemed significant just because it was new, and then what was enriching. I was exhausted by the sheen, and desperate to develop a kind of discernment which would make me so healthy, so OK with myself, that genuine wonder would return--gravitation towards stuff that isn't just shiny, but illuminates the same sorts of truths I'd learned as a fan of Patti, Yoko, and other women who happen to be in this calendar, too. I decided to cut my hair on the shoot, rid myself of any excess. Annie made me feel completely comfortable, like I was the same person as the year before, but indeed older. Again, still very physically short. My foot is peeking out of that shoe. I urge you to look at the other portraits, all so stunning, bold & nearly impossible to turn away from. They are strongest as a group, but I wanted to share what mine means to me and thank you for following what I do in such a way that has allowed for this to happen.
Whether you’re getting married, or you’re simply attending a black-tie event, you’ll definitely spend a lot of time searching for the right outfit. In order to be efficient and be happy with your choice, you should go shopping with a proper hairstyle, makeup and shoes, so you can see the bigger picture. Also, don’t forget to put on some nice underwear – you don’t want to dismiss a dress that doesn’t look good on you because you haven’t paid attention to your panty line.
Why: The leggy blonde provides a tres chic mix of outfit inspiration – her personal style definitely has that insouciant French vibe – and trend and brand lowdowns. The ‘boutique’ section of her site is a one-stop shop for the pieces she loves – and we also like the fact she has regular wardrobe clearouts via Vestiaire so true Camille-alikes can snap up her actual clothes…
I keep a list in the back of one of my journals called "Moments of Strange Magic." It contains events that were either (a) just really, really happy (jumping around to Beyoncé with friends) or (b) aesthetically cohesive and perfect and synesthetic (driving through the desert in a blue convertible to Nancy Sinatra's "Bang Bang" past a bunch of neon-sign motels and trailer parks). Each event is marked with a symbol indicating whether it took place in real life, a movie/TV show/book, or my imagination. Examples of some imagined (b) ones would be: sweaty teens in shiny pastels dancing in unison at a wood-paneled, tinsel-covered community-center room to "Snowqueen of Texas" by the Mamas and the Papas; a view from the side of a guy walking down a school hallway to Frank Ocean's "Forrest Gump," passing lockers painted in the 1970s and a ton of muted, rowdy students; a girl submerging her head into a tub of red hair dye to the chorus of St. Vincent's "Cheerleader."
There was a refreshing shift on the runways this season, and it had little to do with the clothes and everything to do with the casting. While plenty of new faces graced the catwalks as usual, the real surprise was the reappearance of some of the greatest models of the ’90s. Yasmin Le Bon walked at Calvin Klein, Stella Tennant and Georgina Grenville starred at Ferragamo, and Shalom Harlow — who hasn’t set foot on the runway in years — closed Versace (in a floral lace gown and a cloud of her natural ringlets). These women added to the shows a kind of diversity that has been lacking: a range of ages. They also lent strength to the collections, thanks in part to their walks: the powerful, showstopping strides of the original supermodels. — MALINA JOSEPH GILCHRIST, style director, women’s, T magazine
Camille Charriere is an enviably chic Parisian expat now based in London, where she photographs her daily outfit to inspire her many fans. Camille's style is definitely informed by a French fashion sensibility, and she has a genius flair for mixing structured basics (such as a tweed blazer or white t-shirt) with more glamorous separates (say, a satin midi-length skirt). You can use the "Store" link on her site to shop Camille's actual looks via Instagram, so you can recreate her effortlessly stylish outfits. More »

Why: The leggy blonde provides a tres chic mix of outfit inspiration – her personal style definitely has that insouciant French vibe – and trend and brand lowdowns. The ‘boutique’ section of her site is a one-stop shop for the pieces she loves – and we also like the fact she has regular wardrobe clearouts via Vestiaire so true Camille-alikes can snap up her actual clothes…


When In Doubt, Overdress: There's nothing worse than showing up an event underdressed. Maybe the invite didn't specify or involved the word casual — but everyone else dressed up not so casually. If you don't know what the dress code is, overdress. There's no harm in looking too pulled together, but you'll feel uncomfortable if you think you look out of place.
A sloppily cuffed jean. An ill-fitting blazer. A dress that shows just a little too much to be referred to as "tastefully sheer." These are the things that fashion editors and stylists can spot from a million miles away. To those in the biz, the proper proportions of a crop top may be obvious, but for those seeing the trends in a magazine or online, it can be a little trickier to know exactly how to wear everything.
Take Care Of Your Undergarments: To extend the longevity of your bra and ensure a perfect fit each time, you'll need to take care of them properly. The experts at La Vie En Rose recommend you wash your bras by hand to ensure they lasts as long as possible. If you opt for machine washing, unhook your bra to prevent it from twisting and turning. You may also want to use a wash bag which will separate and protect your bras from the rest of your clothes. Make sure you select a delicate or permanent press cycle, and whatever you do, do not use detergent. It's way too harsh and will damage the cup, lace and elasticity of your bra. You might want to try using Forever New Fabric Wash. Air dry your bras by hanging them. Source: La Vie En Rose
“One of the most important things that people need to realize is that just because they buy something in their ‘size,’ doesn’t mean that it’s going to fit them. People get very invested in being a certain size but this is a huge mistake as different designers cut for different body types and also, many companies ‘play with size’ in order to flatter customers. Buy what fits, regardless of the number on the tag.” —Michael O’Connor, personal stylist
And for an expert tip: Arabelle of Fashion Pirate attributes her inspiration to her friends, sharing, “it was their unintentional encouragement that got me to where I am today,” adding that, through the blogging process, she sees the most important change from start-to-finish as “the many friends [she’s] made from blogging, and the experiences [she’s] had with them.” So, bloggers, there's power in numbers.
As with any business it is essential to create a marketing strategy. There are many methods in which you can market your fashion blog, so you will need to first determine what methods you will manage yourself—and which ones you will outsource. While your primary goal may be to learn how to write compelling content for your fashion blog, also consider distributing content elsewhere on the web to drive traffic back to your website. When creating your marketing strategy consider online marketing strategies such as:
There are many quality fashion blogs, which unsurprisingly feature high-quality photographs of the latest fashion innovations.  Most fashion blogs are full of inspiration for those mornings you open your wardrobe door with your mind in a blank. They make an ideal place to begin your online research into what’s hot this year before you head off to purchase your own outfits. They can also provide you with ideas about what you can mix and match to create that perfect look.
Other commercially successful independent fashion blogs include Budget Fashionista, which reportedly brings in $600,000 a year in revenue[23] and The Bag Snob, which "generates a six-figure income, mainly from advertising". By 2008 SheFinds.com was generating $400,000 in revenue per year.[24] Personal style bloggers like Aimee Song from SongofStyle.com has told WWD that she gets paid anywhere from a couple thousand to 50,000 dollars for hosting an event or Instagramming a brand.[25]
Invest In A Quality Iron: A quality iron is an absolute must to ensure you don't damage your clothes. Get one with a range of settings that can conquer even the toughest wrinkles, but gentle enough to iron over delicate fabrics. Because there are so many irons out there, the folks at Real Simple have made it easier for you to decide on one that will meet your needs. Check out their list of the top 40 irons they tried.
When I saw Ware give a talk about his book last November, he said that he could remember what he'd visualized as a child listening to his grandmother tell stories about her own life better than he could picture some events that actually happened to him. When I interviewed him for Rookie, I asked about the one character's dream, why he included that Picasso quotation on the inside cover, what convinced him that such memories could have the same effect on a person as real ones. His response: 

I have been thinking a lot lately about what validates an emotion/event/observation, makes me feel like it really happened and I really lived it, and this seems like the right occasion to word-vomit these ideas. (Plus, I miss having time to keep this thing going, and I do feel an obligation to people who have read my blog for a long time that is not unlike the unspoken understanding you have with your first best friend, the one who watched you like stupid bands and stupid people and embarrass yourself and cry a lot, whose insight into whatever you do from now on is shaped by a unique knowledge of all the ties which bind New You to Old You, and who refrains from bringing up in front of new acquaintances that time you were on the 8th grade hip-hop team in the interest of letting you become more of yourself. In other words, we had a time, but there's so much time ahead, and it is, somehow, at the same time, quickly running out.)
If you invest in one dress style next season, make sure it has ruching - a romantic take on body-con, and much more forgiving. Carefully-positioned ruching has mighty figure-enhancing potential; it adds curves to slimmer frames and those with curvier silhouettes will appreciate its ability to stretch in the right places. Givenchy balanced ruched detailing with accordion pleating to create a dress that will be at the top of many wishlists next season, while Calvin Klein used it to cinch it in the waist.
“One of the most important things that people need to realize is that just because they buy something in their ‘size,’ doesn’t mean that it’s going to fit them. People get very invested in being a certain size but this is a huge mistake as different designers cut for different body types and also, many companies ‘play with size’ in order to flatter customers. Buy what fits, regardless of the number on the tag.” —Michael O’Connor, personal stylist 

VI. My boyfriend and I take a tiny road trip during spring break. We skip stones on the beach, drink Coke out of glass bottles, and watch a pink sunset sky settle into nighttime. We walk along train tracks in the dark and stop to look at an old car behind a restaurant. I ask him to stand in front of it so I can take a Polaroid, the only picture I would have of him.

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