If you’re anything like me, one of your favorite pasttimes, amongst Netflix bingeing and cake baking, is looking at fashion blogs and borderline-stalking bloggers on their websites and social media accounts for outfit inspo. This is a great and enjoyable hobby to have, but can be disheartening if you’re a college student and can barely afford a Venti Starbucks, much less a Valentino purse. Most fashion blogs seem to be full of designer accessories and expensive jeans. But style is style, regardless of the price tag or brand, and whether you spend $5 or $500 on sunglasses, fashion is for all of us.
Less Really Is More: Indecent exposure isn't classy. Celebrity stylist Jen Rade, who has dressed many beauties including Angelina Jolie, told In Style that only one body part should be exposed at a time. If you're baring your decolletage, don't also show off your legs. Remember ladies, a little bit of mystery is alluring. Some things are better left to the imagination. Source: In Style

Athleisure is the trend that keeps giving, and its latest offering is as unexpected as it is stylish. The bike shorts were worn with blazers by many style-savvy showgoers this fashion month. Offering a fresh blend of sportswear and tailoring, the look was both striking and chic. Of course, while it may not be appropriate for either the office or the gym, the outfit is perfect for strutting the streets or attending Sunday brunch with your best friends. So, don’t be afraid to try it for yourself.

The OG fashion blogger and best friend of Fashion Toast's Rumi Neely, the New York-based, Philippines-bred Bryan Grey Yambao has transformed from an online-diary keeper to a celebrity and fashion insider. While other bloggers from his era have fallen off the map, Yambao, 32, has remained relevant by branching out. Memorable projects include a collection with furrier Adrienne Landau and a hosting spot on several seasons of "America's Next Top Model."


Writing: I interviewed Taylor Swift for the cover of ELLE, guest-edited a section of the July/August issue of Poetry Magazine, and guest-edited a Rookie section of the October issue of Nylon. So many talented people of all kinds are featured in both, so take a look! I also wrote the introduction to Petra Collins' book, Babe, which showcases the work of many of my favorite artists.
Dress For Women, Not For Men:The Man Repeller once told us that if women dressed for men, we'd all be wearing bodycon miniskirts and dresses. This is why we have to dress with other women in mind. It actually makes getting dressed easier when you're dressing for style, not for sex, and your confidence will shine through because you'll be more comfortable in what you're wearing. 

"My style is really minimalist. The simpler, the better. I always try to have a balance between what I'm wearing in my upper and lower body. If I'm wearing some simple jeans or a simple skirt, I try to add some scarves or lots of necklaces. If I wear lots of neck accessories I avoid using big hats and lots of bracelets. And it's the other way round: If I'm wearing some saggy jeans with a huge belt I try to keep it simple in the upper body. " —Submitted by Valeria Bernal Malek
“Sadly, if I’ve learned one thing as the owner of a PR firm in LA, the reality is that people do judge a book by its cover. If you are slovenly or unkempt, most likely you will not be taken as seriously as one who is put together.” —Michelle Czernin von Chudenitz Morzin, founder and CEO of Popular Press Media Group    Don’t make these fashion mistakes that make you look messy.
I don't actually think these events really happened to me, but they'll still come to mind when I think back on a time when a secondhand event seemed to hold some kind of truth that reality did not. Example: I felt all weird and drifty at the beginning of last summer, and when I try and revisit that place, I don't literally imagine the view from behind a car windshield and how everything must look to the narrator in Yo La Tengo's "Today Is the Day," but I sure remember the exact sadness that it captured.

Women’s fashion week, men’s fashion week — for a few shows, it was everybody’s fashion week, an acknowledgment that the orthodoxies surrounding gender are, at least in certain corners of the world, eroding as we speak. At Maison Margiela, there were bows on boys and suits on girls, and videos of models proclaiming that breaking rules was “My Mutiny.” (It turned out that Mutiny is the name of Margiela’s new fragrance, and that social movements are as co-optable for profit as anything else. Buyer beware.) But there was a genuine sense of play at upstart shows like Luar and Vaquera in New York and the newly rebranded Courrèges in Paris, a refreshing agnosticism about who could (and would) wear what. Who wears the pants? We does! — M.S.
How to actually do it: "Where your breasts sit on your chest makes a big difference in how clothes fit," says Vazquez. In other words, if you're wearing a bra that fits properly, there will be no sagging or bulging—and that means your silhouette will look trimmer from every angle. The target is midway between your elbows and shoulders. You've scored a match when "the front center panel of the bra lays flat, there's no wrinkling or gapping in the cups, and the bra is not hiking up or creating bulges," says Kristen Supulski, the director of merchandising for Vanity Fair Brands lingerie. "If you can squeeze just two fingers under the band and it still feels snug, that's the perfect fit."
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You know how some people simply know how to wear the right clothes? There’s no mystery there, and actually, you could pull it off, too, by just thinking about what you’re wearing a little bit more. It all depends on how your body is built – you should tend to accent your features in the right way. For example, wearing V neck will make your torso look longer, and wearing nude pups will do miracles for the length of your legs. Embrace your shape and learn to love all its imperfections.
There was basic black — this is fashion week, after all — and monochrome white (the new black?) on the runways of Paris, but some of the season’s most energetic looks put it all on the table, with graphic treatments of black and white. For the bravest and boldest among us, there are stripes (at Dries Van Noten), checkerboard checks (at Balenciaga) and bifurcated blocks of color (at Louis Vuitton): racing gear, even if only for the rat race. — M.S.

There are different ways to avoid calluses, which can really make your day difficult. Most of those problems come from high heels, right? Up until now, I’ve tried different kinds of methods, and the most effective one includes the freezer, believe it or not. If you fill a couple of freezer bags with water, place them in your shoes, and put them into your freezer to stay overnight, you’ll be able to see a huge difference in the morning.


Sporty surf looks were prevalent throughout the season. Perhaps the most major runway moment was at up-and-coming designer Marine Serre’s show, where she created couturelike looks out of neoprene commonly used for wetsuits. Also picking up on this surf trend was CALVIN KLEIN 205W39NYC, with a scuba-inspired ensemble, and Etro, where the model even toted around a printed surfboard. The surf look was even given a luxe makeover by Hermès, where a neoprene swimsuit was layered under a chic leather skirt.
Whether you're tall or curvy, petite, boyish or blessed with curves — dressing in a way that flatters your specific body will always make you feel more confident and beautiful. Taller women can get away with longer hemlines, while more petite women will want to avoid being swallowed up by what they wear. Hourglass figures should embrace figure-hugging dresses and so on.
These memories worsen with time. The original events often occur in adolescence, are usually social interactions, and, at worst, were intended to be romantic. One remedy is to frequently remind yourself that you won't have to live with your humiliation forever because MORTALITY. Or that our perception of reality is pretty inaccurate no matter what (see: Chris Ware; the tiny stoner I quoted earlier). Or that technically — TECHNICALLY — we have no way of knowing for sure that any of this is happening AT ALL. You could also just watch Freaks and Geeks.
About Blog The Blonde Salad is much more than a blog today , it's a real source of inspiration and style for millions people in Italy and around the world. Chiara Ferragni collaborates today with the major Fashion Houses, she appears in the most read magazines, she is the creative director of her shoe line which is entirely Made in Italy and she has been named by Business of Fashion as one of the most influential personalities.
The blogosphere has indeed opened up many doors for the fashion industry, one of which is allowing the ordinary people to partake in the 'elite' fashion world and discuss their likes and dislikes on the way fashion is presented in the media.[6] In 2008, the Pulitzer Prize winning fashion writer and former blogger Robin Givhan, claimed that fashion blogs had democratized the fashion industry. Givhan had also written in Harpers Bazaar that 'The rise of the fashion blogger has evolved [fashion] from an aristocratic business dominated by omnipotent designers into a democratic one in which everyone has access to stylistic clothes...the average people, too often estranged from fashion, is not taking ownership of it'.[7] A similar statement was said by Constance White, the style director for E-bay and former fashion journalist, saying that the impact of the fashion blogosphere has allowed the whole population to take ownership of the fashion world, including people of all different races, genders, and social standings.[8] The Daily Mail writer Karen Kay suggested once in an interview that blogs allow anyone to both critique and praise designers, regardless of the often ‘needed’ professional opinion, with the help fashion blogs, the consumers are helping to set the trends.[9]
Today I am 20. The Crucible, in which I play Mary Warren, opened at the Walter Kerr Theatre three weeks ago, March 31st—also the eight-year anniversary of this blog. I have a lot of trouble comprehending that writing Style Rookie led to writing for other places, then starting Rookie, then being able to audition for plays that I love and to be inside of them for long periods of time, which is an inexplicably wonderful way to live a life. But I am really really really insanely thankful for all of it, and many of you have followed for a LONG time, and that means a lot. Right now, I'm very slowly writing something that I hope will effectively articulate the strangeness of the way these all overlap—the fictions we get to try on via diary/blog-keeping, and acting, and personal style. But that's a longterm hermit project. I just wanted to mention it because in my attempt to briefly list recent stuff I've been up to, I may sound callous, but: None of this goes unexamined or unappreciated.
Founder of Independent Fashion Blogger (IFB), Jennine Jacob, stated how thrilled she was to get the validation from high-end fashion designers (such as Proenza Schouler) that fashion blogging has an incredible impact on the fashion world. Imran Amed stated that there will always be designers and editors that will never fully wrap their head on the huge impact fashion blogging and social media has on the industry, but on the other side of the spectrum, there are numerous designers, editors, branders and writers that do understand and are “coming on board”. He also states that this is a fairly new phenomenon that will take time for fashion world to reap the full benefits.[4]
Instead focus on a name that is fun, unique, and memorable. Opt for a series of 2-4 words that are easy to remember, and not too tricky to spell. You could include your name, or a series of words that sound good together. Consider sneaking words such as fashion or style into the name—but don’t force it. One of our favorite examples of a quirky and memorable blog name is Cupcakes and Cashmere, a blog dedicated to all things food and fashion.
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