Ready-To-Wear Ensembles: Have ready-to-wear ensembles hanging in your closet (yes, even the shoes and if you're really keen, the accessories too). They will come in handy when you either have absolutely nothing to wear or when you're in a rush to pull an outfit together. It's better to have a few for different occasions -- one corporate, one casual and one glamourous look. You can thank us for this tip later.
“You don’t have to spend an arm and a leg to look fantastic, however, we do tend to feel and act a little different when we wear things that are expensive. We treat those things differently too; with more care. We tell ourselves that they are special and that we are special when we wear them. But really it’s the mental story we assign to those items that make them special. Expensive things might trigger those feelings more easily but you can shine just as bright every day with ordinary things, just by acting as you would if they were expensive.” —Jennifer Lowe, stylist and designer for Water Vixen Swim    Learn some more ways you can use clothing to influence your mood.
You might accurately describe Alyson Walsh as the Alexa Chung of her generation: She prefers wearing a good pair of jeans and a T-shirt over anything too fussy. She writes that she started her blog, That's Not My Age, with one mission: "I've always strongly believed that you don't have to have youth to have style, and I wanted to share ideas and celebrate inspirational women (and men) of all ages."
Everything is now a matter of life and death. Math homework: NOT A PRIORITY WHEN THE END COULD BE RIGHT AROUND THE CORNER. Cleaning my room: IS THIS REALLY HOW I WANT TO SPEND MY LAST HOURS ON EARTH WHEN I COULD GET HIT BY A CAR TOMORROW? Etc. The habit that blog-keeping instilled in me of compulsively archiving every single thing only worsens. If I get behind in my journal, I spend hours wondering where to even start. I can't pay attention in class, only make scattered notes where there should be a timeline of the Industrial Revolution, listing all the details I need to get down properly as soon as I have time: The music we listened to in Claire's room, the old man I saw on my way to school, the view from my boyfriend's car when we sat in a 7-Eleven parking lot watching people walk in and trying to predict their purchases, along with a record of what each person looked like and what they bought. My hands tremble, relaxing only once everything has been sufficiently documented, each memory in my grasp, as if by putting them down on paper, I can make them last forever.

"We Wore What" is the brainchild of Danielle Bernstein, who launched her passion for fashion project while a student at New York City's Fashion Institute of Technology. What began as a daily outfit inspiration blog has grown into an aspirational site for those who crave all things beautiful, with posts covering fashion, decor, and lifestyle. Still, it's the fashion photos that keep many of Danielle's million-plus followers coming back, as "Who Wore What" shares impeccably curated and styled outfits from its founder's daily charmed life. More »


"My style is really minimalist. The simpler, the better. I always try to have a balance between what I'm wearing in my upper and lower body. If I'm wearing some simple jeans or a simple skirt, I try to add some scarves or lots of necklaces. If I wear lots of neck accessories I avoid using big hats and lots of bracelets. And it's the other way round: If I'm wearing some saggy jeans with a huge belt I try to keep it simple in the upper body. " —Submitted by Valeria Bernal Malek
I don't actually think these events really happened to me, but they'll still come to mind when I think back on a time when a secondhand event seemed to hold some kind of truth that reality did not. Example: I felt all weird and drifty at the beginning of last summer, and when I try and revisit that place, I don't literally imagine the view from behind a car windshield and how everything must look to the narrator in Yo La Tengo's "Today Is the Day," but I sure remember the exact sadness that it captured.
Though it might vary from location to location, know when the photos are going to come out in the most striking way possible (whatever that might mean for your personal vibe). “Often the best hours for outfit photos are later in the afternoon,” says Chantal van Der Meijden. “I call them the ‘magic hours!’ When the sun is near the horizon and gives a soft hazy front light.”
Everything is now a matter of life and death. Math homework: NOT A PRIORITY WHEN THE END COULD BE RIGHT AROUND THE CORNER. Cleaning my room: IS THIS REALLY HOW I WANT TO SPEND MY LAST HOURS ON EARTH WHEN I COULD GET HIT BY A CAR TOMORROW? Etc. The habit that blog-keeping instilled in me of compulsively archiving every single thing only worsens. If I get behind in my journal, I spend hours wondering where to even start. I can't pay attention in class, only make scattered notes where there should be a timeline of the Industrial Revolution, listing all the details I need to get down properly as soon as I have time: The music we listened to in Claire's room, the old man I saw on my way to school, the view from my boyfriend's car when we sat in a 7-Eleven parking lot watching people walk in and trying to predict their purchases, along with a record of what each person looked like and what they bought. My hands tremble, relaxing only once everything has been sufficiently documented, each memory in my grasp, as if by putting them down on paper, I can make them last forever.

10. Master getting in and out of a car. This is a move we all need to know, and it is crucial when wearing skirts or dresses. To get in a car, seat yourself first while facing the open door. Then keep your legs together and swing them in before scooting over a bit. To get out, keep your legs together and swing them out. Then grab the door and gracefully stand. 


Dress Your Age: Janice Dickinson doesn't look 57, but she is. We're not going to lie, she looks great, but let's face it, it's a tad tacky when 50-somethings try sporting an outfit you'd normally find on 20-somethings — and vice versa. However, tinsel town allows celebrities more leeway than the real world does for us ordinary folk. As a rule of thumb, stick to age appropriate attire.
Turn your calculator on, since this step is all about your payment options. You can choose the 12-month account plan for the lowest price or you might want to consider making a longer commitment. The other two hosting packages will last you twice or thrice the time, and your monthly fee will be lower! As for the rest of the boxes, you can leave them unchecked for now if you want, and return to them when the need occurs.
I also loved “copy your competition and then be better”; what sets each person/blog apart is the perspective they write from. We’re all unique like snowflakes (how precious) but the reality of it is, how are you showing that uniqueness? In order to be a successful blogger, you need to connect with your audience in a way they want to be connected with. Recycling ideas and putting your unique voice and creativity on them is how you’ll connect in a different way than others have. I just bought a book, “Steal like an artist” (by Austin Kleon) that talks about this exact thing!
Fashion’s enduring obsession with the 1980s isn’t going anywhere. From Hedi Slimane’s controversial debut at Celine (all puffball off-the-shoulder minidresses and big-shouldered blazers) to the tie-dye T-shirts, stonewashed denim and shell suits at Stella McCartney — not to mention the oversize sweaters and Madonna crosses on show at Marco de Vincenzo — nostalgia for the era appears to have reached critical mass. Much like now, the ’80s were a polarizing decade both politically and culturally. It is not surprising, then, that these tribute fashions also still split the jury. — E.P.
“Love sexy shoes but not interested in getting blisters and the pain? Use moleskin on your feet. I cut six strips before I go out and keep them in my purse. Then, the minute I start to feel any pressure in an area, I apply it and I avoid any issues. I haven’t suffered from blisters since college. Being unprepared in heels is a rookie maneuver!” —Ms. Lowe
For the 2016 Pirelli Calendar, Annie Leibovitz chose to photograph women whose achievements demonstrate a different kind of beauty from what the calendar has traditionally showcased. I'm still shocked to be included among so many people who've long influenced not just my work, but how I see the world, and try to see myself. Annie photographed me one year earlier in the pink velvet dress I'd originally bought for prom, in my parents' backyard. At that time, it was still my backyard, too, and had functioned since I was a little kid as a personal photo studio, study, and consistent reminder that I was bigger than I had been the year before, and the year before that, and that this would only keep happening. (I'm still v short, but: relatively speaking.) It was where I learned that as your childhood shrinks around you, so will your sense of wonder, unless you choose to pay close attention to what surrounds you at new heights. When Annie shot me for Pirelli, we were just a few blocks from my new home in NYC. A lot happens in that first year, and not knowing the geography of the city makes every encounter feel totally isolated from the rest of the world, like a castle on a cloud. At the time of this shoot, I was parsing what in this year had seemed significant just because it was new, and then what was enriching. I was exhausted by the sheen, and desperate to develop a kind of discernment which would make me so healthy, so OK with myself, that genuine wonder would return--gravitation towards stuff that isn't just shiny, but illuminates the same sorts of truths I'd learned as a fan of Patti, Yoko, and other women who happen to be in this calendar, too. I decided to cut my hair on the shoot, rid myself of any excess. Annie made me feel completely comfortable, like I was the same person as the year before, but indeed older. Again, still very physically short. My foot is peeking out of that shoe. I urge you to look at the other portraits, all so stunning, bold & nearly impossible to turn away from. They are strongest as a group, but I wanted to share what mine means to me and thank you for following what I do in such a way that has allowed for this to happen.

You know how some people simply know how to wear the right clothes? There’s no mystery there, and actually, you could pull it off, too, by just thinking about what you’re wearing a little bit more. It all depends on how your body is built – you should tend to accent your features in the right way. For example, wearing V neck will make your torso look longer, and wearing nude pups will do miracles for the length of your legs. Embrace your shape and learn to love all its imperfections.
This was GREAT content and really helpful. I had already instinctually gone towards a few of the set up things, and the good content idea. Thank you for validating that long posts with good content are good things- I have had many people coach me in the opposite direction. My posts have a lot of content and are long, so I’m glad to hear that I’m not breaking every rule in the book. Thanks for the networking ideas, I had not seen these before.
How to actually do it: "Don't give people too many things to look at all at once," says Halbreich. "If you're wearing a low-cut dress, focus on the cleavage—you don't also need bare arms and legs." The concept applies to fit as well: A body-hugging dress is better with a more sensible neckline and hem, whereas a skirt that hits a few inches above the knee won't raise eyebrows if it's flared rather than tight.
I'm not saying that you have to be perfect all the time. It's absolutely fine to make mistakes, because it's sometimes the only way for you to learn and improve your style. I encourage you to get to know yourself better, simply by exposing yourself to new styles and clothes. Experimenting and having fun with fashion is the key to evolving your style.
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