Donate Clothes You'll Never Wear: Stop hoarding. If you haven't worn it recently, then you probably never will. To help decide if you should toss it or not, the experts at Apartment Therapy suggest you answer the following questions: Do you like cut, fabric and colour? Are you comfortable wearing it? Does it fit you now (no, not if you lose 3 inches off your waist in the next month)? Can any damages like stains or holes be fixed? Do you have more than one place to wear it? Can it be combined with other articles of clothing in your closet? When was the last time you wore it (if it's been over a year, nix it)? Source: Apartment Therapy


Expect to hear this term bandied around a lot next summer. If you like fashion and function to come balanced, then this is a good trend go-to. Denim boiler suits, combat trousers (a style that has been out of fashion long enough to make a return), oversized anoraks and utilitarian jackets prevailed on catwalks including Fendi, Dries Van Noten, Isabal Marant, Balmain, Givenchy and Hermès. Regarding the combat trousers, don't panic - these aren't military inspired, and instead loose-cut with pockets that aren't bulky.
What’s different is their response. When things go wrong, they quickly look for ways to put them right. They don’t whine, pity themselves, or complain about “bad luck.” They try to learn from what happened to avoid or correct it next time and get on with living their life as best they can. They have this Motivation Engine, which most people lack, to keep them going.
Whether you’re getting married, or you’re simply attending a black-tie event, you’ll definitely spend a lot of time searching for the right outfit. In order to be efficient and be happy with your choice, you should go shopping with a proper hairstyle, makeup and shoes, so you can see the bigger picture. Also, don’t forget to put on some nice underwear – you don’t want to dismiss a dress that doesn’t look good on you because you haven’t paid attention to your panty line.
By knowing the shape, scale and proportions of your body, you'll be able to select the best clothes and accessories that create a balanced silhouette that help disguise the parts you're self-conscious about to you pave the way for your confidence. This gives you the curves on all the right places, and leaves plenty of room to play up your best assets.  

When it’s really, really cold outside, sometimes even the items in your wardrobe that you always depend on (everything from ripped jeans to cashmere sweaters) no longer cut it. This is when you have to find creative ways to layer under your clothes that no one will notice. You can, for instance, throw a pair of tights or sheer stockings under a pair of ripped jeans or layer a form-fitting sweater over a long-sleeve T-shirt. Also don’t be afraid to whip out the long johns you normally reserve for ski trips—sometimes during the winter they’ll come in just as handy for the walk to work.

How to actually do it: "Don't give people too many things to look at all at once," says Halbreich. "If you're wearing a low-cut dress, focus on the cleavage—you don't also need bare arms and legs." The concept applies to fit as well: A body-hugging dress is better with a more sensible neckline and hem, whereas a skirt that hits a few inches above the knee won't raise eyebrows if it's flared rather than tight.

“One of the most important things that people need to realize is that just because they buy something in their ‘size,’ doesn’t mean that it’s going to fit them. People get very invested in being a certain size but this is a huge mistake as different designers cut for different body types and also, many companies ‘play with size’ in order to flatter customers. Buy what fits, regardless of the number on the tag.” —Michael O’Connor, personal stylist


About Blog Fashion Talks, produced in partnership with CAFA, is a podcast that observes the world through the lens of fashion. Join host Donna Bishop as she interviews designers, stylists, industry insiders and even those outside fashion to reveal insights, observations, personal stories and historical moments on how fashion helps to shape the world we live in and how our world shapes fashion and the clothes we wear.
When I saw Ware give a talk about his book last November, he said that he could remember what he'd visualized as a child listening to his grandmother tell stories about her own life better than he could picture some events that actually happened to him. When I interviewed him for Rookie, I asked about the one character's dream, why he included that Picasso quotation on the inside cover, what convinced him that such memories could have the same effect on a person as real ones. His response:
The ruffles perchance that dominated last summer will endure next year. For all those bored with languid, smooth shapes, cascades of frills subverted childlike associations this season. Simone Rocha's felt off-kilter, and Yves Saint Laurent's had a 1980s Prince appeal. Marc Jacobs, never one to buck to commercialism, designed his with dramatic flourishes and fantastical feathers.
"Well, really, our memories are all we have, and even those we think of as "real" are made up. Art can condense experience into something greater than reality, and it can also give us permission to do or think certain things that otherwise we’ve avoided or felt ashamed of. The imagination is where reality lives; it’s the instant lie of backwash from the prow of that boat that we think of as cutting the present moment, everything following it becoming less and less "factual" but no less real than what we think of as having actually occurred."

Accidents happen, you can’t argue with that. No matter how careful you are, something will get spilled when you least expected it. So, have a spare clothing item nearby at all times possible. Start by taking something to your office, like perhaps a white button-down shirt, which is a classic, and it will probably be able to fit in your outfit. Believe it or not, most woman don’t have the right white shirt – it’s the same story like the one with bras, so look for a second opinion when purchasing one.
“When people are constantly chasing the next trend, they can look like they’re trying too hard. It’s better to have a true, individual sense of style and for those of us who are navigating between work, family, friends, and a social life, it comes down to balance. Dress simply and have great accent pieces.” —Ms. Morzin    Watch out for the things your boss wishes you’d stop wearing to work.
Don't Pretend It Fits: We've all been there, standing in the dressing room and convincing ourselves that the button will magically stay closed when we get home (and then, of course, it doesn't). These are the times where we have to accept that our bodies have changed in one way or another, and buy clothes that fit. Because you know what happens to the clothes that don't fit (cue garbage bags being dropped off at Goodwill here).
Neely, 31, launched Fashion Toast in 2007. Her particular style of blogging -- photo-heavy posts featuring cool clothes and model poses -- has greatly influenced the generation of influencers who have followed her. While Neely has collaborated with established brands in the past, she recently launched her own line. Are You Am I, a collection of slip dresses, tap pants and distinctly cut tees, is notable for its specificity. For fans who want to emulate Neely's style -- and there are plenty of them -- there is nothing more perfect. 
You know how some people simply know how to wear the right clothes? There’s no mystery there, and actually, you could pull it off, too, by just thinking about what you’re wearing a little bit more. It all depends on how your body is built – you should tend to accent your features in the right way. For example, wearing V neck will make your torso look longer, and wearing nude pups will do miracles for the length of your legs. Embrace your shape and learn to love all its imperfections.
Turn your calculator on, since this step is all about your payment options. You can choose the 12-month account plan for the lowest price or you might want to consider making a longer commitment. The other two hosting packages will last you twice or thrice the time, and your monthly fee will be lower! As for the rest of the boxes, you can leave them unchecked for now if you want, and return to them when the need occurs.
Consider this your ultimate guide to fashion blogging. We’ve enlisted the help of some of our favorites — from Tavi Gevinson to Chiara Ferragni and more — who have not only figured out how to make their love of fashion and style a true lifestyle, but also how to make money sharing what they love with all of us. Read on for all of their tips and tricks you need to know before starting a fashion blog yourself.
Hope you had a wonderful Thanksgiving! Loved connecting with many of you on social about some of the best holiday sales and promotions over the weekend. I’m excited to share another awesome find today - this bird print skirt which is on final clearance. (Only two sizes left - eek!) I couldn’t resist a print that is a prime opportunity to pair red and pink together, and the fact that it’s a bird print? Icing on the cake!

Designer Tanya Taylor, who recently expanded her range of elaborate floral frocks and smart blouses to include plus sizes, wants you to show your body off! “I believe in dressing for your body type, not hiding it,” she told Observer. That means going for a frock with a nipped-in waist or a skirt that emphasizes your curves. Concealing your frame under a billowing silhouette won’t do you any favors.
There are both free and premium choices for your blog’s WordPress theme, with extreme price differences, ranging from $3 to $1,000. It definitely makes sense for to sift through the free themes first, because there are so many options and you’ll get a better idea of what you want. Plus, themes are like clothes shopping; you can try the theme on to check the fit before making your selection. Most theme repositories, including WordPress’ own wordpress.org, give you the opportunity to preview a theme before downloading, installing or even paying for it.
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