An argument for the past-life theory might include this anecdote: A drawing I did in my journal of how I remembered the backyard of my boyfriend's house looking on a night that it was snowy and dark included a metal swingset. The next time I went over there, I realized I'd only imagined the swingset, though he later told me that they did have one when he was little. My mom then told me that our family almost bought that same house before I was born, meaning that, in that timeline, I would have known that metal swingset, in that backyard. 
Everything is now a matter of life and death. Math homework: NOT A PRIORITY WHEN THE END COULD BE RIGHT AROUND THE CORNER. Cleaning my room: IS THIS REALLY HOW I WANT TO SPEND MY LAST HOURS ON EARTH WHEN I COULD GET HIT BY A CAR TOMORROW? Etc. The habit that blog-keeping instilled in me of compulsively archiving every single thing only worsens. If I get behind in my journal, I spend hours wondering where to even start. I can't pay attention in class, only make scattered notes where there should be a timeline of the Industrial Revolution, listing all the details I need to get down properly as soon as I have time: The music we listened to in Claire's room, the old man I saw on my way to school, the view from my boyfriend's car when we sat in a 7-Eleven parking lot watching people walk in and trying to predict their purchases, along with a record of what each person looked like and what they bought. My hands tremble, relaxing only once everything has been sufficiently documented, each memory in my grasp, as if by putting them down on paper, I can make them last forever.

Invest In A Quality Iron: A quality iron is an absolute must to ensure you don't damage your clothes. Get one with a range of settings that can conquer even the toughest wrinkles, but gentle enough to iron over delicate fabrics. Because there are so many irons out there, the folks at Real Simple have made it easier for you to decide on one that will meet your needs. Check out their list of the top 40 irons they tried.


But before you drop a few grand on a new wardrobe of very trendy pieces, take some tips from fashion professionals, including Net-A-Porter’s Fashion Director Lisa Aiken, stylist-turned-jeweler Jennifer Fisher and milliner extraordinaire Gigi Burris O’Hara. Here, these industry insiders drop some knowledge on how to overhaul your closet, shop a bit smarter and look like you always sit front row at NYFW. Here’s to a chic and stylish New Year!
When In Doubt, Overdress: There's nothing worse than showing up an event underdressed. Maybe the invite didn't specify or involved the word casual — but everyone else dressed up not so casually. If you don't know what the dress code is, overdress. There's no harm in looking too pulled together, but you'll feel uncomfortable if you think you look out of place.
To play it safe, combine a neutral, like flax, with something bolder, like yellow. But think twice about pairing intense hues with black, which "can look dated," says designer Chris Benz. For something punchier, try two colors that are beside each other on the color wheel, such as coral and orange. Not sure where to begin? "Notice what colors you love and respond to in your decor," says Benz.
The blogosphere has indeed opened up many doors for the fashion industry, one of which is allowing the ordinary people to partake in the 'elite' fashion world and discuss their likes and dislikes on the way fashion is presented in the media.[6] In 2008, the Pulitzer Prize winning fashion writer and former blogger Robin Givhan, claimed that fashion blogs had democratized the fashion industry. Givhan had also written in Harpers Bazaar that 'The rise of the fashion blogger has evolved [fashion] from an aristocratic business dominated by omnipotent designers into a democratic one in which everyone has access to stylistic clothes...the average people, too often estranged from fashion, is not taking ownership of it'.[7] A similar statement was said by Constance White, the style director for E-bay and former fashion journalist, saying that the impact of the fashion blogosphere has allowed the whole population to take ownership of the fashion world, including people of all different races, genders, and social standings.[8] The Daily Mail writer Karen Kay suggested once in an interview that blogs allow anyone to both critique and praise designers, regardless of the often ‘needed’ professional opinion, with the help fashion blogs, the consumers are helping to set the trends.[9]
“If you have an hourglass body type, look for styles and fabrics that reduce bulk and showcase your waist. Tailored pieces and stretchy fabrics that hug and accentuate your frame will bring out the natural lines of your hourglass shape. Look for blended knit fabrics and slimming neckline styles such as v-necks and scoop necks. A simple wrap dress is the one go to piece a woman with an hourglass frame should have in her closet.” —Kristina Michniak, stylist and global apparel manager for Spreadshirt    Here’s how to dress to look ten pounds thinner.
About Blog My name is Bisma from New York and the Author and Editor of this blog. I love everything related to beauty and fashion and my blog is just a mean to share my way of style with the world. My blog is all about Fashion and Beauty. You will find product reviews on makeup, skincare and occasional hair/body care products along with the outfit posts, latest fashion trends and news.
References: Zoltan Torey copes with blindness by reconstructing reality in his head. Wes Anderson called Moonrise Kingdom a "memory of a fantasy," and envisioned the whole "These Days" scene from The Royal Tenenbaums when he first heard the song, building the rest of the movie around that moment (I have no source for this, a friend told me, I'll choose to believe it's true). I also wrote a bit about this in relation to The Virgin Suicides here.
"Wide Eyed Legless" is the fashion project of Madelynn Hackwith Furlong, a professional designer, art director, stylist and consultant who has collaborated with major brands, including J.Crew and Rachel Comey. Madelynn launched her style blog to inspire modern women to build a simpler, more thoughtful wardrobe, home, and lifestyle. It all started with a massive closet cleanse, that turned into a mission to build "the perfect wardrobe" through buying less, choosing higher-quality pieces, dressing with more intention, and taking an elegantly minimalist approach to the art of dressing. More »

This site is a go-to for fashion-forward women who are shopping on a budget. Not only is the site dedicated to recreating celebrity looks with cheaper options (that look very similar, if not identical!), but it also is a source for style tips and the latest trends. See an outfit you love on Chrissy Teigen? Just hop over to the site to find out how to have it without spending three months worth of paychecks.


About Blog YesStyle.com is the first online retailer in Asia to globally distribute a wide range of lifestyle and fashion products from the region. On their blog you will find the true definition of Asian Fashion with their Street Photography section, and you will be charmed by the laissez-faire air of their Lifestyle columns. Want in on the BBcream craze? You can turn to their beauty vloggers for a flawless finish.
"Every woman really only needs 20 core items in her closet," advises Nazarudin. "A black pair of pants, a blue blazer, a cashmere V-neck sweater in a jewel tone, and so on." Outside of these 20, you can experiment with more inexpensive items — if you don't like them, it's not nearly as bad as if you dropped $300 on a trendy piece you only wore once. If you need tips on how to maximize your basics, check out Good Housekeeping Style Director Lori Bergamotto's weeklong experiment in wearing the same thing every day.
I don't actually think these events really happened to me, but they'll still come to mind when I think back on a time when a secondhand event seemed to hold some kind of truth that reality did not. Example: I felt all weird and drifty at the beginning of last summer, and when I try and revisit that place, I don't literally imagine the view from behind a car windshield and how everything must look to the narrator in Yo La Tengo's "Today Is the Day," but I sure remember the exact sadness that it captured.
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