Once you’ve gained a solid following, you can start reaching out to clothing brands. This is the fun part! The first step is to create a list of PR or word of mouth marketing agencies that represent the brands you love and ask to be added to their media list. (Try Googling the brand name you’re after and the phrase “PR firm.” It’s likely a press release will pop up, giving you the contact information you need.) It’s also helpful to keep tabs on the industry by reading sites such as PRSA.org, FashionablyMarketing.Me, and PR Couture.
I keep a list in the back of one of my journals called "Moments of Strange Magic." It contains events that were either (a) just really, really happy (jumping around to Beyoncé with friends) or (b) aesthetically cohesive and perfect and synesthetic (driving through the desert in a blue convertible to Nancy Sinatra's "Bang Bang" past a bunch of neon-sign motels and trailer parks). Each event is marked with a symbol indicating whether it took place in real life, a movie/TV show/book, or my imagination. Examples of some imagined (b) ones would be: sweaty teens in shiny pastels dancing in unison at a wood-paneled, tinsel-covered community-center room to "Snowqueen of Texas" by the Mamas and the Papas; a view from the side of a guy walking down a school hallway to Frank Ocean's "Forrest Gump," passing lockers painted in the 1970s and a ton of muted, rowdy students; a girl submerging her head into a tub of red hair dye to the chorus of St. Vincent's "Cheerleader."
It's a little awkward, so we'll get straight to the point: This Thursday we humbly ask you to protect Wikipedia's independence. We depend on donations averaging about $16.36, but 99% of our readers don't give. If everyone reading this gave $3, we could keep Wikipedia thriving for years to come. The price of your Thursday coffee is all we need. When we made Wikipedia a non-profit, people warned us we'd regret it. But if Wikipedia became commercial, it would be a great loss to the world. Wikipedia is a place to learn, not a place for advertising. It unites all of us who love knowledge: contributors, readers and the donors who keep us thriving. The heart and soul of Wikipedia is a community of people working to bring you unlimited access to reliable, neutral information. Please take a minute to help us keep Wikipedia growing. Thank you.
About Blog Fashion Talks, produced in partnership with CAFA, is a podcast that observes the world through the lens of fashion. Join host Donna Bishop as she interviews designers, stylists, industry insiders and even those outside fashion to reveal insights, observations, personal stories and historical moments on how fashion helps to shape the world we live in and how our world shapes fashion and the clothes we wear.
"Pick out your outfit the night before. I cannot tell you how many times I used to not bother, then be in a rush in the morning and just put on the first thing I could find in a hurry. That way you can pick something practical, stylish and feel great, rather than rushing and feeling like a hot mess all day! Plus it gives you time to pick out your accessories — which I had a habit of running out without when I would pick it out in the morning!" —Submitted byKrissie Gonzalez
About Blog Erica is a style influencer, graphic/blog designer, & creator of the fashion DIY blog, Fashionlush. She got her degree in fashion merchandising w/ a minor in textile development & currently lives in the beautiful town of San Diego. Fashionlush is a blog for the style obsessed & showcases Erica’s personal looks, fashion related DIY projects, & her many inspirations in the world of fashion.
A blog is a great way to share your personal style, as well as your take on the latest trends from established designers.  A blog that delivers quality content can be a great way to gain recognition as a fashion expert.  While only a few bloggers are seen as true fashion icons, many lesser-known fashion blogs have gained quite a bit of mainstream attention recently, effectively launching the fashion careers of the bloggers behind them.
There are both free and premium choices for your blog’s WordPress theme, with extreme price differences, ranging from $3 to $1,000. It definitely makes sense for to sift through the free themes first, because there are so many options and you’ll get a better idea of what you want. Plus, themes are like clothes shopping; you can try the theme on to check the fit before making your selection. Most theme repositories, including WordPress’ own wordpress.org, give you the opportunity to preview a theme before downloading, installing or even paying for it.
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