He wasn’t the only designer to incorporate artwork into the runway experience. At Loewe, Jonathan Anderson installed several rooms of artwork at Maison de l’Unesco for his show: There were woven baskets in some (by Joe Hogan, a finalist for this year's Loewe Craft Prize and one of its past winners), ceramics in others (by Ryoji Koie) and, in the room where I was seated, giant whirring brushes of the kind that you might otherwise find at a car wash (by Lara Favoretto) — after the show, security guards gleefully posed alongside them. And at Vivienne Westwood, Andreas Kronthaler went full circus. He worked with Bernhard Willhelm, who art directed the show; there were musclemen riding scooters and models riding skateboards and, as a centerpiece, an enormous paper sculpture by the London-based set designer Gary Card, who spent the show in the middle of it all, fixing and remolding it with a team of assistants wielding bottles of flame retardant. The cumulative effect — and how often can you say this at a fashion show — was a good time had by all. — MATTHEW SCHNEIER, deputy fashion critic and reporter, Styles
Fashion blogs first appeared in the blogosphere prior to 2002.[16] Both the number of fashion blogs and the number of media mentions of fashion blogs has grown considerably since then. Published accounts of the growing number of fashion blogs are mentioned above, and a Facteva search reveals that media articles mentioning "fashion blogs" grew from one in 2002 to over 100 in 2006. 

"Wide Eyed Legless" is the fashion project of Madelynn Hackwith Furlong, a professional designer, art director, stylist and consultant who has collaborated with major brands, including J.Crew and Rachel Comey. Madelynn launched her style blog to inspire modern women to build a simpler, more thoughtful wardrobe, home, and lifestyle. It all started with a massive closet cleanse, that turned into a mission to build "the perfect wardrobe" through buying less, choosing higher-quality pieces, dressing with more intention, and taking an elegantly minimalist approach to the art of dressing. More »
Why: The leggy blonde provides a tres chic mix of outfit inspiration – her personal style definitely has that insouciant French vibe – and trend and brand lowdowns. The ‘boutique’ section of her site is a one-stop shop for the pieces she loves – and we also like the fact she has regular wardrobe clearouts via Vestiaire so true Camille-alikes can snap up her actual clothes…
I have been thinking a lot lately about what validates an emotion/event/observation, makes me feel like it really happened and I really lived it, and this seems like the right occasion to word-vomit these ideas. (Plus, I miss having time to keep this thing going, and I do feel an obligation to people who have read my blog for a long time that is not unlike the unspoken understanding you have with your first best friend, the one who watched you like stupid bands and stupid people and embarrass yourself and cry a lot, whose insight into whatever you do from now on is shaped by a unique knowledge of all the ties which bind New You to Old You, and who refrains from bringing up in front of new acquaintances that time you were on the 8th grade hip-hop team in the interest of letting you become more of yourself. In other words, we had a time, but there's so much time ahead, and it is, somehow, at the same time, quickly running out.) 

Once you’ve gained a solid following, you can start reaching out to clothing brands. This is the fun part! The first step is to create a list of PR or word of mouth marketing agencies that represent the brands you love and ask to be added to their media list. (Try Googling the brand name you’re after and the phrase “PR firm.” It’s likely a press release will pop up, giving you the contact information you need.) It’s also helpful to keep tabs on the industry by reading sites such as PRSA.org, FashionablyMarketing.Me, and PR Couture.
“There are so many trend pieces, online articles, news snippets, and magazine blurbs about what the next ‘it’ things are or what things you ‘should never be seen in again.’ All that is propaganda. True personal style is that which looks great to the outside world but makes the wearer feel even greater inside. If you are confident in your style, it will project beauty no matter what you’re wearing.” —Stephen V Hernandez, a personal stylist based out of NYC  
Don't Pretend It Fits: We've all been there, standing in the dressing room and convincing ourselves that the button will magically stay closed when we get home (and then, of course, it doesn't). These are the times where we have to accept that our bodies have changed in one way or another, and buy clothes that fit. Because you know what happens to the clothes that don't fit (cue garbage bags being dropped off at Goodwill here).
When it’s really, really cold outside, sometimes even the items in your wardrobe that you always depend on (everything from ripped jeans to cashmere sweaters) no longer cut it. This is when you have to find creative ways to layer under your clothes that no one will notice. You can, for instance, throw a pair of tights or sheer stockings under a pair of ripped jeans or layer a form-fitting sweater over a long-sleeve T-shirt. Also don’t be afraid to whip out the long johns you normally reserve for ski trips—sometimes during the winter they’ll come in just as handy for the walk to work.
What’s different is their response. When things go wrong, they quickly look for ways to put them right. They don’t whine, pity themselves, or complain about “bad luck.” They try to learn from what happened to avoid or correct it next time and get on with living their life as best they can. They have this Motivation Engine, which most people lack, to keep them going.

I'm not saying that you have to be perfect all the time. It's absolutely fine to make mistakes, because it's sometimes the only way for you to learn and improve your style. I encourage you to get to know yourself better, simply by exposing yourself to new styles and clothes. Experimenting and having fun with fashion is the key to evolving your style. 
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