Despite being something that everyone does literally every day, getting dressed (or putting together an outfit, if you want to get fancy), can feel like the trickiest, most frustrating part of the morning. Who hasn't stood in front of a closet full of clothing and thought “I have nothing to wear!?” Rest assured, you're not alone in this daily conundrum. To that end, we consulted a panel of experts—top designers, style consultants, and retail pros—to demystify the act (art?) of getting dressed, once and for all.
If Your Weight Changes A Lot, Update Your Wardrobe: This goes back to the point of not pretending things fit when they don't. It's important to make sure our clothing fits, and though it's hard to admit that you've gained weight (trust us, we struggle with this) or when you've lost weight, you can ignore the fact and stick with the same baggy clothes. Either way, it's kind of a fun reason to update your wardrobe.
Writing: I interviewed Taylor Swift for the cover of ELLE, guest-edited a section of the July/August issue of Poetry Magazine, and guest-edited a Rookie section of the October issue of Nylon. So many talented people of all kinds are featured in both, so take a look! I also wrote the introduction to Petra Collins' book, Babe, which showcases the work of many of my favorite artists.

Fashion is a multibillion-dollar industry that has considerable impact on the way ordinary people dress and present themselves and relies heavily on media and advertising to communicate the producer's preferences and goals and influence public perception through various types of promotion; at the same time, fashion can be influenced by social change and counter-trends outside the producer, retailer or advertiser's control. As fashion is driven by trends within and without the fashion industry, fashion blogs and other "new media" outside the control of traditional establishment represent a disruptive innovation to the social dynamics of mass media and fashion consumption in modern consumer society. It is likely that the blogosphere will have a considerable long-term influence on the industry, as the number of fashion based blogs continue to grow, with increasing numbers of consumers able to create and modify the media that they consume, and traditional producers and advertisers adapting their practices to avoid dilution of their own influence.
Purse Essentials: A purse isn't just a fashion statement. It's main purpose is functional. You carry it around wherever you go so it needs to contain some essentials: your wallet, a pen, pain killers, hand sanitizer, tissues, make-up essentials (we personally won't leave the house without lip stick and/or lip balm), hand cream, gum or breath mints, tampons or maxi pads (no one wants to be caught off guard during that time of the month), and for those of you who spend lengthy bouts talking, texting or gaming, bring your phone charger along.
Unlike fashion-focused magazines and television shows, fashion blogs are able to be updated more frequently, keeping up to date with the new and up-and-coming fashion trends.[10] Not only are fashion blogs easier to access, many fashion blog readers (interviewed in Swedish fashion management study) stated that fashion blogs are far more personable and are more 'up to date' on both local and foreign trends. These blogs are granting unlimited access to the fashion world to anyone that has a connection to a computer. Karen Kay also stated that, “These days, before a designer’s runway show has even finished, you can bet your bottom dollar that someone in the audience, or better still, backstage, has recorded every silhouette, signature shoe, styling detail and sulking supermodel, then uploaded it onto the internet for style watchers across the globe to enjoy”.[citation needed] The interviewed Swedish fashion blog readers, stated above, had also stated that fashion blogs had helped share and promote new trends to a much greater extent than other fashion mediums. Unlike mainstream magazines and newspapers, which are constricted to what they write, blogs have the ease of writing about anything that interests author(s), allowing for a more broad spectrum of focused fashion trends.[9]

Discover 2018’s latest clothing trends from fashion's top designers—and see how your favorite celebrities are wearing and pairing their perfectly chosen mix of trendy and classic clothes. Get on fashion's cutting-edge right now with our editors' picks for trendy outfit ideas and shop our curation of celebrity-approved dresses, jeans, shirts, skirts, sweaters and jackets that will become your own wardrobe staples.
Fashion designers have often referenced art and artists through the years, and for Spring 2019, designers tapped into everything from futurism to Memphis design. At Marni, images were collaged and printed on draped dresses and coats. Most notably, at Louis Vuitton, Nicolas Ghesquière channeled early '90s geometric Memphis pattern on a number of his Spring runway looks.
Fashion blogs first appeared in the blogosphere prior to 2002,[16] and Kathryn Finney, founder of Budget Fashionista, was invited to New York Fashion Week as early as September 2003;[14] a short time later, Fashiontribes.com was being seated fourth row at shows like Bill Blass. Paris-based American fashion blogger Diane Pernet, founder of A Shaded View on Fashion[18], has been called "the original style blogger[19]" by The New York Times, and has been a fashion blogger since 2005[20].
Los Angeles-based wardrobe stylist and YouTube vlogger Chriselle Lim is the fashionable force behind "The Chriselle Factor," a fashion blog that provides insight into her personal fashion style. Chriselle's site covers fashion, beauty, and lifestyle topics, ranging from travel to fitness and home decor. In the Fashion section of her blog, Chriselle shares photos of the drool-worthy outfits she wears to her jaunts to Fashion Week in Paris and New York City, among other stylish points of travel. Informed by a fashion sense that's super-feminine and completely trend-obsessed, this blog is a major destination for anyone looking for up-to-the-moment fashion inspiration. More »
When it comes to fashion tips, it sometimes seems that everyone and their mother (literally!) has tried-and-true style advice they absolutely swear by. Some are useful, while others … well, not so much. With that in mind, we’ve culled 101 style tips from the best: designers, lifestyle experts and, of course, our staff. Trust us: With these gems, you’ll be well on your way to living your most stylish life.

The segment of bloggers in their 30s, 40s, 50s, and beyond may be small, but it's mighty. We aim to enlighten you, dear reader, about the ladies of all ages who are killing the fashion-blogging game at the moment—from the 25-year-old whippersnappers to the 65-year-olds who've been at it for a good while longer. Prepare to be majorly inspired by all the women showing off their unique (and frankly, fun) looks. Keep scrolling to meet the best fashion bloggers of every age group!
The OG fashion blogger and best friend of Fashion Toast's Rumi Neely, the New York-based, Philippines-bred Bryan Grey Yambao has transformed from an online-diary keeper to a celebrity and fashion insider. While other bloggers from his era have fallen off the map, Yambao, 32, has remained relevant by branching out. Memorable projects include a collection with furrier Adrienne Landau and a hosting spot on several seasons of "America's Next Top Model."
By the middle of winter it’s pretty inevitable that you’re going to start to feel some fatigue when it comes to putting on your boring old winter coat day after day. Add new life to your coat simply by belting it. Cinching your waist will make it seem almost like you have a brand new coat. The best news of all: This styling trick will work with just about any coat style—we’ve even seen some serious fashionistas belt puffer coats!
I was asked to share my "big big world" at the Sydney Opera House and the Melbourne Writers Festival and mostly talked about fangirling, the anxiety of influence, and being happy instead of putting pressure on yourself to be some tortured artist. I love Neil Gaiman's "make good art" speech, but I wanted to talk about what happens when you can't make good art, and about how fulfilling it can be to appreciate other people's art. If you prefer to watch the FIRST-EVER DELIVERY of this thing, the Sydney one is here, but I've embedded the slightly-updated Melbourne one above.

I don't actually think these events really happened to me, but they'll still come to mind when I think back on a time when a secondhand event seemed to hold some kind of truth that reality did not. Example: I felt all weird and drifty at the beginning of last summer, and when I try and revisit that place, I don't literally imagine the view from behind a car windshield and how everything must look to the narrator in Yo La Tengo's "Today Is the Day," but I sure remember the exact sadness that it captured.

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