The segment of bloggers in their 30s, 40s, 50s, and beyond may be small, but it's mighty. We aim to enlighten you, dear reader, about the ladies of all ages who are killing the fashion-blogging game at the moment—from the 25-year-old whippersnappers to the 65-year-olds who've been at it for a good while longer. Prepare to be majorly inspired by all the women showing off their unique (and frankly, fun) looks. Keep scrolling to meet the best fashion bloggers of every age group!
The blogosphere has indeed opened up many doors for the fashion industry, one of which is allowing the ordinary people to partake in the 'elite' fashion world and discuss their likes and dislikes on the way fashion is presented in the media.[6] In 2008, the Pulitzer Prize winning fashion writer and former blogger Robin Givhan, claimed that fashion blogs had democratized the fashion industry. Givhan had also written in Harpers Bazaar that 'The rise of the fashion blogger has evolved [fashion] from an aristocratic business dominated by omnipotent designers into a democratic one in which everyone has access to stylistic clothes...the average people, too often estranged from fashion, is not taking ownership of it'.[7] A similar statement was said by Constance White, the style director for E-bay and former fashion journalist, saying that the impact of the fashion blogosphere has allowed the whole population to take ownership of the fashion world, including people of all different races, genders, and social standings.[8] The Daily Mail writer Karen Kay suggested once in an interview that blogs allow anyone to both critique and praise designers, regardless of the often ‘needed’ professional opinion, with the help fashion blogs, the consumers are helping to set the trends.[9]

Tie-dye emerged as a fashion influencer favourite for summer 2018, and it's a look that was compounded on the catwalk. No longer solely the preserve of art teachers and ageing hippies, tie-dye has had a modern update, At Dior, the brand employed its meticulous craftsmanship to the process to create kaleidoscope versions, sometimes layering tie-dye over florals. Miuccia Prada went for a flouro approach, used to reflect a liberated woman. Stella McCartney's version came in blue and white boilersuits, T-shirts and combat trousers.
The versions about the origin of casual style are diverse, too. According to one, it originated in a small Scottish town Aberdeen, particularly in a football club, where everyone wore his/her name on the clothes. The fans of football and the founders of this club wanted to be different from the others and they created a unique football style, characterized by the pieces of certain brands. Further, the football fans realized that the brands were not at all important. And they started concentrating on the comfort and the harmony of the pieces that were combined and the casual style was born. According to another version, the native Scandinavian people of the countryside used this style for their combinations.
The spring collections always encourage designers to wax bohemian — a flower here, a fringe there. But what seemed different this season was where, and how frequently, these ideas appeared. Chloé and Paco Rabanne in Paris were leaders of the pack, each constructing garments from layers of contrasting floral prints that evoked exotic gardens. Patchwork and fringe were reimagined too, as was the case at Altuzarra, where seashell-embellished net sheaths topped knit dresses. Finally, at Etro, flowing paisley dresses were worn with vibrantly patterned wool blankets. — M.J.G. 

Dress For Women, Not For Men:The Man Repeller once told us that if women dressed for men, we'd all be wearing bodycon miniskirts and dresses. This is why we have to dress with other women in mind. It actually makes getting dressed easier when you're dressing for style, not for sex, and your confidence will shine through because you'll be more comfortable in what you're wearing.

Ready for a mind-blowing fashion hack? According to Lauren Edelstein, Style Director at Shopbop, all you need to do to determine whether or not a pair of jeans will fit is to wrap the waist around your neck — if the ends meet without overlapping (or stretching), they'll fit your waist. "The neck trick is one I was skeptical about, but it really works!"

I think what is missing in the blogging world is passion for experimenting! For me is not so much a design beautiful, like a mental shock, something crazy that makes you shake. The absurdity is able to move brains. The impudence is capable of stirring mountains. The best way to do something different is expressing your truth, knowing yourself, because everyone is different. One idea: put an artist in your life!: Squeeze all the fruits that have the reach, naked but dressed, and enjoy putting your juice in the network…
Blogger Krystal Bick is the woman behind "This Time Tomorrow," a fashion blog that covers style, travel, art, dating, and other topics related to living in New York City. A transplanted West Coaster, Krystal's fashion vibe is a true blend of East and West coast American style (or you could say, girlfriend meets boyfriend style). Her looks tend to gravitate toward classic, tailored pieces inspired by menswear, but often with feminine and quirky accents thrown in, such as a pair of cropped patterned trousers, a silky blouse, high heel pumps, and an over-sized men's watch. More »
Don't Pretend It Fits: We've all been there, standing in the dressing room and convincing ourselves that the button will magically stay closed when we get home (and then, of course, it doesn't). These are the times where we have to accept that our bodies have changed in one way or another, and buy clothes that fit. Because you know what happens to the clothes that don't fit (cue garbage bags being dropped off at Goodwill here). 

About Blog Wendy finds inspiration in art, nature, culture, architecture, food, people, and music. And for her, fashion is a compilation of all that. Fashion is a vehicle for her to play with shapes and colors in order to uncover her personal style. Even though she is inspired by images she see on the runways, she is more captivated by images she see on the streets.
Utah-based Christine Andrew is the blogger behind "Hello Fashion" and the founder of clothing line ILY Couture. She originally launched her blog to promote her clothing line, but it soon evolved into an online diary of her super-stylish IRL wardrobe and shopping finds. Today, Christine shares her creativity and love of fashion through her popular outfit posts, which include plenty of "how to style" tips that her fans love. Christine's sense of style blends feminine and sporty pieces, so you'll often see her grounding a more feminine, dressy look with sneakers or ankle boots. More »

Speaking of rules, we should mentioned those regarding showing skin. It’s pretty simple – show one body part at a time. So if you’re showing your cleavage, pay attention you’re not combining that with miniskirts, and the other way around. Looking and feeling attractive shouldn’t be based on how naked you are. A little bit of mystery is always a nice touch.


About Blog Hi, I am Kier Mellour. On this blog, you will find weekly “I want that” posts where I share my current cravings, style inspiration posts, and personal outfits for a variety of events and travel destinations. There will be videos of thrift store hauls, current favorite products, as well as, thorough reviews on clothing, accessories, and lifestyle products.

Speaking of rules, we should mentioned those regarding showing skin. It’s pretty simple – show one body part at a time. So if you’re showing your cleavage, pay attention you’re not combining that with miniskirts, and the other way around. Looking and feeling attractive shouldn’t be based on how naked you are. A little bit of mystery is always a nice touch.


Blogger Krystal Bick is the woman behind "This Time Tomorrow," a fashion blog that covers style, travel, art, dating, and other topics related to living in New York City. A transplanted West Coaster, Krystal's fashion vibe is a true blend of East and West coast American style (or you could say, girlfriend meets boyfriend style). Her looks tend to gravitate toward classic, tailored pieces inspired by menswear, but often with feminine and quirky accents thrown in, such as a pair of cropped patterned trousers, a silky blouse, high heel pumps, and an over-sized men's watch. More » 

"Unless you know someone’s gonna see it, it's best to wear something that flatters you and creates the best shape possible. There’s nothing more unsightly than a visible panty line or quad boob, and proper underwear means you don’t have to worry about anything falling out! Also there’s not much worse than the look or the feeling of a too-small bra, and I would know, what with wearing a 34DD all my life and then finding I should have been wearing a 30H!" —Submitted by jessicarosehailes

Mirror mirror on the wall... (end the caption, be creative )😏| Photo and editing : @rommisantos #lookdujour#lookdeldia#lookdodia#tenueoftheday#outfitdujour#todayimwearing#blogmode#outfitoftoday###outfitdujour#goingoutlook#todaysoutfit#todayslook#myoutfit#fashionblogger#outfitideas#ootd#instagirl#look#fashion#fashionstyle#ootdstyle #ootdwomen#personalstyle#bloggersofinstagram#ootdlovers#fashiondaily


Rookie Yearbook Four, the print edition of our fourth year, comes out October 20: 352 pages of beautiful writing and art by young people, plus print-only contributions from people like Amandla Stenberg, Kiernan Shipka, Jazz Jennings, Dev Hynes of Blood Orange, Emma Roberts, Sarah Paulson, Charli XCX, DeJ Loaf, Ezra Koenig of Vampire Weekend, Florence Welch of Florence and the Machine, Donna Tartt, Shamir, Chloe of Kitten, Rashida Jones, Tracee Ellis Ross, Joy Williams, Hayley Williams of Paramore, Lorde, Tyler Ford, Ariana Grande, Edward Droste of Grizzly Bear, Solange, and Willow Smith. WHEW. See also: stickers, posters, a cut-out diorama and banner, ET CETERA FOREVER. I've never been able to choose a favorite Rookie Yearbook until now. It is our final one (senior year!) and I can't wait for Rookies THE WORLD OVER to see it. (Mr. Burns laugh, but in the name of good things like self-esteem and creativity.)

1. Think of gray and white hairs as glitter. Blend in those sparkly strands with cool silvery or warm golden salon highlights. Ask for balayage — a free-form technique where highlights are painted on with a brush for an irregular root line — that looks natural and won't leave a ring of regrowth at the scalp. And major bonus: Highlights around the face also brighten tired, ashy or sallow skin tones for a no-makeup-needed radiance.
“If you have a pear body type, look for styles that elongate your figure to take the emphasis away from your lower body. You want to draw attention to your upper torso, and the best ways to do that are with pairing dark colored bottom pieces with lighter shades and patterns up top. Think of bold patterns and necklines that have detailing like embellishments or ruffles. You should avoid skinny jeans and instead opt for boot cut or those with a slight flare. Showing your shoulders also helps in drawing attention upwards and balancing your top half with your bottom half proportions.” —Ms. Michniak    Here are other denim mistakes you make that could ruin your outfit.

About Blog Wendy finds inspiration in art, nature, culture, architecture, food, people, and music. And for her, fashion is a compilation of all that. Fashion is a vehicle for her to play with shapes and colors in order to uncover her personal style. Even though she is inspired by images she see on the runways, she is more captivated by images she see on the streets.
How to actually do it: Odds are, there's a grown-up version of the style du jour. Take crop tops: To avoid revealing skin, pair a shirt that hits at the navel with a high-waisted skirt—or a longer top with a crop top over it. "It gives you a similar look," promises designer Rebecca Minkoff. Bottom line: "You never want to seem like you're uncomfortable with your age and trying to look younger," says Lilliana Vazquez, a style expert and the editor of TheLVGuide.com.
I keep a list in the back of one of my journals called "Moments of Strange Magic." It contains events that were either (a) just really, really happy (jumping around to Beyoncé with friends) or (b) aesthetically cohesive and perfect and synesthetic (driving through the desert in a blue convertible to Nancy Sinatra's "Bang Bang" past a bunch of neon-sign motels and trailer parks). Each event is marked with a symbol indicating whether it took place in real life, a movie/TV show/book, or my imagination. Examples of some imagined (b) ones would be: sweaty teens in shiny pastels dancing in unison at a wood-paneled, tinsel-covered community-center room to "Snowqueen of Texas" by the Mamas and the Papas; a view from the side of a guy walking down a school hallway to Frank Ocean's "Forrest Gump," passing lockers painted in the 1970s and a ton of muted, rowdy students; a girl submerging her head into a tub of red hair dye to the chorus of St. Vincent's "Cheerleader."
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“One of the most important things that people need to realize is that just because they buy something in their ‘size,’ doesn’t mean that it’s going to fit them. People get very invested in being a certain size but this is a huge mistake as different designers cut for different body types and also, many companies ‘play with size’ in order to flatter customers. Buy what fits, regardless of the number on the tag.” —Michael O’Connor, personal stylist 

Fashion is a multibillion-dollar industry that has considerable impact on the way ordinary people dress and present themselves and relies heavily on media and advertising to communicate the producer's preferences and goals and influence public perception through various types of promotion; at the same time, fashion can be influenced by social change and counter-trends outside the producer, retailer or advertiser's control. As fashion is driven by trends within and without the fashion industry, fashion blogs and other "new media" outside the control of traditional establishment represent a disruptive innovation to the social dynamics of mass media and fashion consumption in modern consumer society. It is likely that the blogosphere will have a considerable long-term influence on the industry, as the number of fashion based blogs continue to grow, with increasing numbers of consumers able to create and modify the media that they consume, and traditional producers and advertisers adapting their practices to avoid dilution of their own influence.
The hardest part of shopping is deciding when it’s enough. It’s more than easy to be carried away, but with a little bit of planning, you’ll be able to make it work. Start by making a list of items you need. Second step is to look for possible discounts, or some coupons you might have. However, don’t buy something just because it’s cheap – the chances you won’t put it one more than twice. Remember, cost-effective and cheap are not synonyms. It’s important to stick with your schedule, and make a type of agreement with yourself. Also, always pick quality before quantity. If you’re in doubt should you purchase an expensive item, make sure to check its lining – if you’re able to notice its quality, take it. A nice lining is a signature of designer clothes.
How to actually do it: Odds are, there's a grown-up version of the style du jour. Take crop tops: To avoid revealing skin, pair a shirt that hits at the navel with a high-waisted skirt—or a longer top with a crop top over it. "It gives you a similar look," promises designer Rebecca Minkoff. Bottom line: "You never want to seem like you're uncomfortable with your age and trying to look younger," says Lilliana Vazquez, a style expert and the editor of TheLVGuide.com.
8. Find your new perfect bra. Get fitted for the breasts you have now — not the 34B you think you are (and were in college). Head straight for the lingerie section of a department store or find the perfect size by following an online quiz at ThirdLove.  Weight changes, gravity and fitness routine (or lack of) affect your chest size. If you wear the right bra, your clothes will fit better and your entire silhouette will look longer and trimmer. Buy two: one to wear, one as a backup for laundry days (and always hand-wash and hang dry). Bosomy celebs keep their breasts up and off their midriff. You should, too.

4. Dress age-irrelevant. Who says you can't wear a black fisherman cap, short-sleeve or message T-shirts, funky sneakers, slouchy Army-green cargo pants and your hair in a tousle? A little infusion of urban, hippie or eclectic style makes every wardrobe, from classic to casual, a little cooler. Celebs like Meg Ryan, Lisa Bonet, Sharon Stone, Téa Leoni, Robin Wright, Halle Berry and Calista Flockhart all dress in age-irrelevant but supercool ways in their private lives. 

Kathleen’s blog was created out of the realization that post-grad life wasn’t as fabulous as Carrie Bradshaw had led her to believe (even as adults, we’re still trying to solve the puzzle of how Carrie could afford a closet-full of Manolos on a writer’s salary). But looking at her inspiring outfits and picture-perfect lifestyle, you might have to disagree that it is extremely fabulous (except she pulls it all off with affordable pieces and doable outfit ideas).
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