This is where you should start – there’s no room for change if you don’t make it yourself. Open up your closet and take a good look at your clothes. You should ask yourself one simple question – if you were in a store right now, what items from your closet would you buy? It’s a very simple and quite efficient game you should play once in a while. If you want to stop spending hours in front of your closet, it needs to be neat and color coordinated – hoarding clothes always leads to a mess. All clothes you decide need to go shouldn’t be thrown away – donate them! That way, you’ll feel good about it.
Instead focus on a name that is fun, unique, and memorable. Opt for a series of 2-4 words that are easy to remember, and not too tricky to spell. You could include your name, or a series of words that sound good together. Consider sneaking words such as fashion or style into the name—but don’t force it. One of our favorite examples of a quirky and memorable blog name is Cupcakes and Cashmere, a blog dedicated to all things food and fashion.
The title of Patti Gibbons's blog, Not Dead Yet, really says it all. She might be a woman in her 60s, but she's not dead yet—and she certainly doesn't dress as such. With a penchant for power prints and a commitment to wearing exactly what she feels like wearing, Gibbons has our stamp of approval (as well as that of outlets like The Huffington Post).
There are both free and premium choices for your blog’s WordPress theme, with extreme price differences, ranging from $3 to $1,000. It definitely makes sense for to sift through the free themes first, because there are so many options and you’ll get a better idea of what you want. Plus, themes are like clothes shopping; you can try the theme on to check the fit before making your selection. Most theme repositories, including WordPress’ own wordpress.org, give you the opportunity to preview a theme before downloading, installing or even paying for it.
“Does this accentuate the best version of who I am as a woman?” Brother Vellies designer Aurora James asks this, before buying a vibrant animal-print coat or an over-the-top dress. “For me, I love things that have a ‘wow factor,’ so if I’m going to splurge and buy something, I want it to be the clothing version of myself,” James explains. It’s a brilliant trick for making sure that your purchase is something you’ll actually wear; if you feel like yourself in a piece of clothing, you’re more likely to gravitate towards it when it’s hanging in your closet.
Accessorizing is what actually gives an outfit a personal touch. The way you accessorize is an important part of your style. Most of garments in your color are probably (and should be) in neutral colors, so you can combine them when you find it suitable. So, when you’re purchasing accessories, you should be free to get them in wild colors. Also, don’t be afraid to clash together different materials, like edgy chains with pears and feathers, perhaps. An interesting addition to accessorizing somehow everyone tends to forget are buttons – try switching a set from your garment with the one you choose. It doesn’t require any special sewing skills, and it fits any kind of budget. You should know that accessorizing rounds out an outfit, so try to find time to put on a couple of items.
Tuxedos may have been a talking point at the SS19 shows (more of that later), but there was a broader tailoring trend likely to change the way we dress next season. The industry is moving away from the more fluid midi styles of recent seasons to a sharper silhouette - tailored trousers were styled with shirts and belts for a pulled-together look that still feels softer than a suit - Balenciaga, Burberry and Givenchy were just a few to adopt the trouser-shirt line of thinking. It was an accessible take on androgyny and one that women beyond a size eight can really wear. The result? Clothes that look polished, elegant and confidence-boosting.
The ruffles perchance that dominated last summer will endure next year. For all those bored with languid, smooth shapes, cascades of frills subverted childlike associations this season. Simone Rocha's felt off-kilter, and Yves Saint Laurent's had a 1980s Prince appeal. Marc Jacobs, never one to buck to commercialism, designed his with dramatic flourishes and fantastical feathers.
Work Out Stylishly: Come on, let's be serious, the gym can be an intimidating place with so many buff, sweaty bods. We'd be lying if we didn't say we never wore mascara before lacing up. But hitting the gym shouldn't make you fret. It should make you feel good. Getting some trendy workout clothes that fit your body will make you feel more confident and encourage you to break a sweat.
Other commercially successful independent fashion blogs include Budget Fashionista, which reportedly brings in $600,000 a year in revenue[23] and The Bag Snob, which "generates a six-figure income, mainly from advertising". By 2008 SheFinds.com was generating $400,000 in revenue per year.[24] Personal style bloggers like Aimee Song from SongofStyle.com has told WWD that she gets paid anywhere from a couple thousand to 50,000 dollars for hosting an event or Instagramming a brand.[25]
This style is practically impossible to imagine without our fave denim pieces. The reason is that denim is practical and comfortable. For instance, you can put on skinny jeans with a short tunic or a light blouse with romantic flare design, of course, not forgetting about the fact that this style doesn’t absolutely bear glamorous details like beads, glitter, or rhinestones.
There are many quality fashion blogs, which unsurprisingly feature high-quality photographs of the latest fashion innovations.  Most fashion blogs are full of inspiration for those mornings you open your wardrobe door with your mind in a blank. They make an ideal place to begin your online research into what’s hot this year before you head off to purchase your own outfits. They can also provide you with ideas about what you can mix and match to create that perfect look.
How to actually do it: "Figure out your go-to, foolproof looks," says designer Nanette Lepore, then seek out variations on that theme. Stumped? Picture the outfits that you feel most comfortable in. Or ask people close to you what you look best in. Once you've zeroed in on what works, find different takes. "I gravitate toward jackets, so I'll do a bomber style, then a silk version, or a denim jacket with leather sleeves," says Minkoff. "Whenever you feel the need to talk yourself into things, that's a red flag that you shouldn't buy them," says Minkoff. If you have doubts in the dressing room, it may help to take a photo of yourself in the item, suggests Aerin Lauder, the founder and creative director of the lifestyle brand Aerin. "It's much more accurate than looking in the mirror."
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