Now that you’ve learned the 2 simple things you can do to take control of your fate and create your own luck. But this isn’t it! These simple techniques you’ve learned here are just part of the essential 7 Cornerstone Skills — a skillset that will give you the power to create permanent solutions to big problems in life — any problem in any area of your life!
Blogger Krystal Bick is the woman behind "This Time Tomorrow," a fashion blog that covers style, travel, art, dating, and other topics related to living in New York City. A transplanted West Coaster, Krystal's fashion vibe is a true blend of East and West coast American style (or you could say, girlfriend meets boyfriend style). Her looks tend to gravitate toward classic, tailored pieces inspired by menswear, but often with feminine and quirky accents thrown in, such as a pair of cropped patterned trousers, a silky blouse, high heel pumps, and an over-sized men's watch. More »
Mason, who writes a monthly column for Marie Claire and designed her own collection for Modcloth last fall, is one of the most in-demand bloggers working right now. The 29-year-old writer played a role in the promotion and social media around Target's new plus-size collection Ava & Viv and is also a budding TV personality, offering style advice on programs including "Today" and "Good Morning America." Mason is notable because she uses her blog as a platform to discuss bigger social issues, including race, sexuality and body image. 

"Unless you know someone’s gonna see it, it's best to wear something that flatters you and creates the best shape possible. There’s nothing more unsightly than a visible panty line or quad boob, and proper underwear means you don’t have to worry about anything falling out! Also there’s not much worse than the look or the feeling of a too-small bra, and I would know, what with wearing a 34DD all my life and then finding I should have been wearing a 30H!" —Submitted by jessicarosehailes
The title of Patti Gibbons's blog, Not Dead Yet, really says it all. She might be a woman in her 60s, but she's not dead yet—and she certainly doesn't dress as such. With a penchant for power prints and a commitment to wearing exactly what she feels like wearing, Gibbons has our stamp of approval (as well as that of outlets like The Huffington Post).
How to actually do it: Strive to wear colors that enhance one another rather than "match" in the traditional sense. For an easy hack, says Minkoff, "look at a simple color wheel. The colors that are opposite each other on the wheel complement each other." (Think non-obvious but fetching combos, like orange and navy or purple and saffron.) Diversifying your accessories, in both color and texture, is another do. (A beloved trio from the vault of Betty Halbreich, a personal shopper at New York City's Bergdorf Goodman and the author of the style memoir I'll Drink to That: "A black dress, navy shoes, and a burgundy handbag.") And under no circumstances should you ever rock a suite of jewelry. Says Vazquez, " Anything that was sold together as a set looks really dated."
By the middle of winter it’s pretty inevitable that you’re going to start to feel some fatigue when it comes to putting on your boring old winter coat day after day. Add new life to your coat simply by belting it. Cinching your waist will make it seem almost like you have a brand new coat. The best news of all: This styling trick will work with just about any coat style—we’ve even seen some serious fashionistas belt puffer coats!
How to actually do it: "Don't give people too many things to look at all at once," says Halbreich. "If you're wearing a low-cut dress, focus on the cleavage—you don't also need bare arms and legs." The concept applies to fit as well: A body-hugging dress is better with a more sensible neckline and hem, whereas a skirt that hits a few inches above the knee won't raise eyebrows if it's flared rather than tight.
If you already love and wear a particular brand, don’t just ask to be added to the list—also let the agency know why your blog would be an excellent fit and send links of posts where you’ve worn the brand before. Also try directly reaching out to emerging brands that may not be large enough to have their own agency—they’re likely excited to grow their own following and eager to work with you.
"Pick out your outfit the night before. I cannot tell you how many times I used to not bother, then be in a rush in the morning and just put on the first thing I could find in a hurry. That way you can pick something practical, stylish and feel great, rather than rushing and feeling like a hot mess all day! Plus it gives you time to pick out your accessories — which I had a habit of running out without when I would pick it out in the morning!" —Submitted byKrissie Gonzalez
If you’re anything like me, one of your favorite pasttimes, amongst Netflix bingeing and cake baking, is looking at fashion blogs and borderline-stalking bloggers on their websites and social media accounts for outfit inspo. This is a great and enjoyable hobby to have, but can be disheartening if you’re a college student and can barely afford a Venti Starbucks, much less a Valentino purse. Most fashion blogs seem to be full of designer accessories and expensive jeans. But style is style, regardless of the price tag or brand, and whether you spend $5 or $500 on sunglasses, fashion is for all of us.
3. Give “them” a “package deal”. If you have a taste for looking good, why not pass that gift on to others? Many (i mean it) people who follow fashion blogs have very little fashion sense, so if you provide them with something like a good looking outfit, they will be more prone to share/like/follow. I’m not saying give away $200 jeans; i mean put those clothes together (on yourself or just laid out), snap a picture, and put it up as “the outfit for the day” or whatever. You can even geo-target this and base the outfit on the weather (or whatever).
Personal style bloggers sometimes get a bad rap -- caricatured as pretty, brainless girls who dress up for their camera-wielding boyfriends and post their results to a WordPress blog. But over the past decade, these independent publishers have become a real force in the fashion industry -- not just snapping up front row seats at fashion shows, but landing major campaigns and collaborations with brands, becoming regular guests on TV shows like "Today" and "America's Next Top Model," and turning their blogs into multimillion-dollar businesses. Some have become household names.
Fashion is a multibillion-dollar industry that has considerable impact on the way ordinary people dress and present themselves and relies heavily on media and advertising to communicate the producer's preferences and goals and influence public perception through various types of promotion; at the same time, fashion can be influenced by social change and counter-trends outside the producer, retailer or advertiser's control. As fashion is driven by trends within and without the fashion industry, fashion blogs and other "new media" outside the control of traditional establishment represent a disruptive innovation to the social dynamics of mass media and fashion consumption in modern consumer society. It is likely that the blogosphere will have a considerable long-term influence on the industry, as the number of fashion based blogs continue to grow, with increasing numbers of consumers able to create and modify the media that they consume, and traditional producers and advertisers adapting their practices to avoid dilution of their own influence.
Fashion’s enduring obsession with the 1980s isn’t going anywhere. From Hedi Slimane’s controversial debut at Celine (all puffball off-the-shoulder minidresses and big-shouldered blazers) to the tie-dye T-shirts, stonewashed denim and shell suits at Stella McCartney — not to mention the oversize sweaters and Madonna crosses on show at Marco de Vincenzo — nostalgia for the era appears to have reached critical mass. Much like now, the ’80s were a polarizing decade both politically and culturally. It is not surprising, then, that these tribute fashions also still split the jury. — E.P.
Camille Charriere is an enviably chic Parisian expat now based in London, where she photographs her daily outfit to inspire her many fans. Camille's style is definitely informed by a French fashion sensibility, and she has a genius flair for mixing structured basics (such as a tweed blazer or white t-shirt) with more glamorous separates (say, a satin midi-length skirt). You can use the "Store" link on her site to shop Camille's actual looks via Instagram, so you can recreate her effortlessly stylish outfits. More »

Expect to hear this term bandied around a lot next summer. If you like fashion and function to come balanced, then this is a good trend go-to. Denim boiler suits, combat trousers (a style that has been out of fashion long enough to make a return), oversized anoraks and utilitarian jackets prevailed on catwalks including Fendi, Dries Van Noten, Isabal Marant, Balmain, Givenchy and Hermès. Regarding the combat trousers, don't panic - these aren't military inspired, and instead loose-cut with pockets that aren't bulky.

Fashion has always loved a showman. This season, however, the “experiential show” — in which design houses collaborate with artists, musicians, dancers or directors to present blockbuster catwalk spectacles — was more popular than ever before. Inspired by dance and movement, Maria Grazia Chiuri’s sixth ready-to-wear collection for Dior was unveiled in Paris by models who wove their way around eight twirling dancers on a 164-meter-square stage, part of a dazzling performance choreographed by Sharon Eyal. At Gucci, Alessandro Michele had Jane Birkin serenade the crowd midway through the show with a rendition of “Baby Alone in Babylone” at the Théâtre Le Palace. And in Milan, Giorgio Armani asked the ’90s British heartthrob Robbie Williams to croon his greatest hits to an audience of thousands at the Emporio Armani show, held in a giant hangar at Linate airport. — E.P.
“Don’t be intimidated by fashion! Fashion is supposed to be fun and happy, not to cause stress. The key to finding personal style is to list—yes, write them down—items that make you feel comfortable and confident and the things that make you feel uncomfortable or just not yourself. The latter group? Don’t wear them! Not matter how trendy they are.” —Mr. Hernandez
A significant section of the blog is “Outfits,” and this predominantly features what Grasie wears in her daily activities. The posts are highly visual, with captions describing the outfits worn, often explaining why Grasie likes and wears particular items. She generally includes links to sites where her fans can buy items to emulate her look, often giving alternatives in various price ranges.
"Reflecting and archiving is not the same as dwelling in the past. It is not anti-living, but a part of life, even a crucial one. We do this to highlight one thing above others, so that a special moment can take up more space in our brains than an inconsequential one; so that, by plain math, our personal worlds contain more good things and fewer bad ones. Or more interesting things and fewer blah ones, since you have to record the bad, too."
You check the app first thing after your alarm goes off in the morning, so why not let it influence your outfit for the day. “It shows me how a mix of women are dressing, from designers to stylists to influencers to my friends and which styles they’re actually wearing day to day,” said Taylor. Consider saving inspiring outfits into a “Collection” on your account, so you can easily access outfits you want to emulate.
"Wide Eyed Legless" is the fashion project of Madelynn Hackwith Furlong, a professional designer, art director, stylist and consultant who has collaborated with major brands, including J.Crew and Rachel Comey. Madelynn launched her style blog to inspire modern women to build a simpler, more thoughtful wardrobe, home, and lifestyle. It all started with a massive closet cleanse, that turned into a mission to build "the perfect wardrobe" through buying less, choosing higher-quality pieces, dressing with more intention, and taking an elegantly minimalist approach to the art of dressing. More »
“Start small,” is Marilyn’s advice for adding a pop of color to your everyday looks. She suggests adding a neck scarf or a colorful pair of shoes to start and then building your way up to a totally color-filled wardrobe. She also thinks red is a great starting point. “Red is really so timeless; it’s bright and bold and goes with everything. It’s such a strong and empowering color,” she noted.
These memories worsen with time. The original events often occur in adolescence, are usually social interactions, and, at worst, were intended to be romantic. One remedy is to frequently remind yourself that you won't have to live with your humiliation forever because MORTALITY. Or that our perception of reality is pretty inaccurate no matter what (see: Chris Ware; the tiny stoner I quoted earlier). Or that technically — TECHNICALLY — we have no way of knowing for sure that any of this is happening AT ALL. You could also just watch Freaks and Geeks.
The ruffles perchance that dominated last summer will endure next year. For all those bored with languid, smooth shapes, cascades of frills subverted childlike associations this season. Simone Rocha's felt off-kilter, and Yves Saint Laurent's had a 1980s Prince appeal. Marc Jacobs, never one to buck to commercialism, designed his with dramatic flourishes and fantastical feathers.
“I wish people understood that in fashion less is more.  For example, if you are wearing an off-the-shoulder top, make that your focal point. You don’t need anything else. Huge earrings or a statement necklace will be overwhelming—the top is sexy chic as is!” —Jennifer Berger, stylist and president of Wear it Well   These fashion mistakes are making you look older.
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