1. Think of gray and white hairs as glitter. Blend in those sparkly strands with cool silvery or warm golden salon highlights. Ask for balayage — a free-form technique where highlights are painted on with a brush for an irregular root line — that looks natural and won't leave a ring of regrowth at the scalp. And major bonus: Highlights around the face also brighten tired, ashy or sallow skin tones for a no-makeup-needed radiance.
About Blog Wendy finds inspiration in art, nature, culture, architecture, food, people, and music. And for her, fashion is a compilation of all that. Fashion is a vehicle for her to play with shapes and colors in order to uncover her personal style. Even though she is inspired by images she see on the runways, she is more captivated by images she see on the streets.

Hedi Slimane's debut Celine show may have been divisive, but there are few designers that make tailoring so desirable. Scrap evening dresses in favour of a tuxedo, a chic, nonchalant alternative, and a look favoured not only by Slimane, but also Giambattista Valli who went for crisp white and at Givenchy in the form of tuxedo dresses - a style already worn by the Duchess of Sussex. Alexander McQueen created a keyhole tux to reveal a hint of skin and Hermès showcased versions with missing buttons.
Emily Schuman is a former Conde Nast staffer (including a stint at Teen Vogue), who in 2008 combined her love of fashion, beauty, and food to launch her website "Cupcakes and Cashmere." Today, Emily has published a best-selling book inspired by her blog, and is the entrepreneur behind a clothing line that's sold at major retailers, including Nordstrom and Bloomingdales, as well as her own e-commerce lifestyle site. On Cupcakes and Cashmere, Emily shares her evolving fashion style through outfit posts, which tend toward casually chic everyday looks, many involving denim, black trousers, or sheath dresses. More »
I was asked to share my "big big world" at the Sydney Opera House and the Melbourne Writers Festival and mostly talked about fangirling, the anxiety of influence, and being happy instead of putting pressure on yourself to be some tortured artist. I love Neil Gaiman's "make good art" speech, but I wanted to talk about what happens when you can't make good art, and about how fulfilling it can be to appreciate other people's art. If you prefer to watch the FIRST-EVER DELIVERY of this thing, the Sydney one is here, but I've embedded the slightly-updated Melbourne one above.
Bucket hats are well and truly back. Yes, the iconic ’90s accessory is a must-have item for ’18/’19 and should undoubtedly be on your shopping list if you don’t already own one. Providing both sun protection and style, these casual and cool hats are perfect for weekend ensembles. Whether plain, patterned or featuring a logo, the brimmed hats add an on-trend edge to any outfit. Wear them with dresses, slouchy suits, overalls, and more.

In the constantly growing landscape of fashion bloggers, it's an unfortunate fact that the younger crowd significantly outnumbers ladies of a certain age. It seems everywhere you look, it's nothing but beautiful 20-somethings showing off their style, and while there are certainly more of them, that doesn't make them any more relevant or valuable than their more mature counterparts. Fashion is universal, after all.
An argument for the past-life theory might include this anecdote: A drawing I did in my journal of how I remembered the backyard of my boyfriend's house looking on a night that it was snowy and dark included a metal swingset. The next time I went over there, I realized I'd only imagined the swingset, though he later told me that they did have one when he was little. My mom then told me that our family almost bought that same house before I was born, meaning that, in that timeline, I would have known that metal swingset, in that backyard. 
“You don’t have to spend an arm and a leg to look fantastic, however, we do tend to feel and act a little different when we wear things that are expensive. We treat those things differently too; with more care. We tell ourselves that they are special and that we are special when we wear them. But really it’s the mental story we assign to those items that make them special. Expensive things might trigger those feelings more easily but you can shine just as bright every day with ordinary things, just by acting as you would if they were expensive.” —Jennifer Lowe, stylist and designer for Water Vixen Swim    Learn some more ways you can use clothing to influence your mood.
"Pick out your outfit the night before. I cannot tell you how many times I used to not bother, then be in a rush in the morning and just put on the first thing I could find in a hurry. That way you can pick something practical, stylish and feel great, rather than rushing and feeling like a hot mess all day! Plus it gives you time to pick out your accessories — which I had a habit of running out without when I would pick it out in the morning!" —Submitted byKrissie Gonzalez
A significant section of the blog is “Outfits,” and this predominantly features what Grasie wears in her daily activities. The posts are highly visual, with captions describing the outfits worn, often explaining why Grasie likes and wears particular items. She generally includes links to sites where her fans can buy items to emulate her look, often giving alternatives in various price ranges.
How to actually do it: "Don't give people too many things to look at all at once," says Halbreich. "If you're wearing a low-cut dress, focus on the cleavage—you don't also need bare arms and legs." The concept applies to fit as well: A body-hugging dress is better with a more sensible neckline and hem, whereas a skirt that hits a few inches above the knee won't raise eyebrows if it's flared rather than tight.

Ready for a mind-blowing fashion hack? According to Lauren Edelstein, Style Director at Shopbop, all you need to do to determine whether or not a pair of jeans will fit is to wrap the waist around your neck — if the ends meet without overlapping (or stretching), they'll fit your waist. "The neck trick is one I was skeptical about, but it really works!" 

Expect to hear this term bandied around a lot next summer. If you like fashion and function to come balanced, then this is a good trend go-to. Denim boiler suits, combat trousers (a style that has been out of fashion long enough to make a return), oversized anoraks and utilitarian jackets prevailed on catwalks including Fendi, Dries Van Noten, Isabal Marant, Balmain, Givenchy and Hermès. Regarding the combat trousers, don't panic - these aren't military inspired, and instead loose-cut with pockets that aren't bulky.
How to actually do it: "Figure out your go-to, foolproof looks," says designer Nanette Lepore, then seek out variations on that theme. Stumped? Picture the outfits that you feel most comfortable in. Or ask people close to you what you look best in. Once you've zeroed in on what works, find different takes. "I gravitate toward jackets, so I'll do a bomber style, then a silk version, or a denim jacket with leather sleeves," says Minkoff. "Whenever you feel the need to talk yourself into things, that's a red flag that you shouldn't buy them," says Minkoff. If you have doubts in the dressing room, it may help to take a photo of yourself in the item, suggests Aerin Lauder, the founder and creative director of the lifestyle brand Aerin. "It's much more accurate than looking in the mirror."
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