The New York Times "Style" section writer, Eric Wilson, did an extensive study on the impact of fashion bloggers on the fashion industry for one of his style columns. Wilson wrote that these bloggers have ascended ‘from the nosebleed seats to the front row’ in the past year and that the divide between the ‘high code’ editors with a professional opinion and the ‘amateur’ fashion bloggers is beginning to disintegrate. Wilson interviewed prominent publicists, editors and designers. Publicist Kelly Cutrone stated that over the past two years, there has been a complete change in who is writing about fashion. Not only does Cutrone say she needs to keep a watch on the editors of mainstream writings, such as Vogue and Elle, but now she needs to monitor on the millions of fashion bloggers around the world. Cutrone goes on the later state that once these bloggers post anything on the internet, it never comes off, and it now becomes the first thing that the designers will see.[5]


These are only a few marketing strategies to take into consideration. Ensure that you place a high value on social marketing because the imagery of a fashion blog works well on social media platforms. On top of that, social media and blogs account for 23% of internet users time spent online—and over 80% of all American’s frequent social media and blogs.


"Every woman really only needs 20 core items in her closet," advises Nazarudin. "A black pair of pants, a blue blazer, a cashmere V-neck sweater in a jewel tone, and so on." Outside of these 20, you can experiment with more inexpensive items — if you don't like them, it's not nearly as bad as if you dropped $300 on a trendy piece you only wore once. If you need tips on how to maximize your basics, check out Good Housekeeping Style Director Lori Bergamotto's weeklong experiment in wearing the same thing every day.
The New York-based Eadie, 29, is best known for her accessible, yet educated, approach to fashion. Based in San Francisco when she launched the blog, Eadie has worked as a merchandiser for brands like Gap and Tory Burch, which means she has a professional edge when it comes to outfit posts. And brands like love working with her because she has a reputation for converting readers into shoppers.  

A sale should never be a cue to buy something. I mean, not never, but it should not always be (which is the case for most of us). If you have been waiting for a particular product to go on sale, sure, pick it up, but if it’s a random dress you want just because it is on discount, ask yourself if you’d buy it if it wasn’t on sale. You have your answer.
A significant section of the blog is “Outfits,” and this predominantly features what Grasie wears in her daily activities. The posts are highly visual, with captions describing the outfits worn, often explaining why Grasie likes and wears particular items. She generally includes links to sites where her fans can buy items to emulate her look, often giving alternatives in various price ranges.
Think quality over quantity. When shopping, pay attention to the materials and craftsmanship of the garments you purchase. Then once you buy quality items, take proper care of them. Have them tailored, have them professionally cleaned regularly as needed, hang them on velvet hangers (just say no to wire hangers!), take your shoes to a cobbler when they need to be polished or resoled. Basic care will go a long way in extending the life of your clothes and shoes!
About Blog The Darling Detail, LLC is an Austin-based fashion and inspiration blog designed to emphasize on-trend, classic, and everyday details with a specific focus on fast fashion, professional photography and relatable writing. By incorporating a chic, feminine and darling-esque style with inspiring details that are affordable, attainable and on-trend.
Neely, 31, launched Fashion Toast in 2007. Her particular style of blogging -- photo-heavy posts featuring cool clothes and model poses -- has greatly influenced the generation of influencers who have followed her. While Neely has collaborated with established brands in the past, she recently launched her own line. Are You Am I, a collection of slip dresses, tap pants and distinctly cut tees, is notable for its specificity. For fans who want to emulate Neely's style -- and there are plenty of them -- there is nothing more perfect. 
Things were balmier in Milan, when Missoni held its 65th anniversary show on a rooftop, though the wind did pick up enough to make it hard for musical guest star Michael Nyman to turn the pages of his sheet music. And in Paris, everyone got downright lucky: Hermès staged its show at the Hippodrome de Longchamp where the horse track was obscured by a giant runway-long mirror angled up to reflect the clouds drifting across a soft blue sky; Sonia Rykiel unveiled a collection at night in a pedestrian thoroughfare in the Sixth Arrondissement of Paris, a.k.a. the newly christened Allée Sonia Rykiel (the first street ever named after a designer in the city); and Marine Serre’s latest looks traversed an elevated walkway overlooking endless railroad tracks. There were more, but you get where we’re going. — V.F.
You know how some people simply know how to wear the right clothes? There’s no mystery there, and actually, you could pull it off, too, by just thinking about what you’re wearing a little bit more. It all depends on how your body is built – you should tend to accent your features in the right way. For example, wearing V neck will make your torso look longer, and wearing nude pups will do miracles for the length of your legs. Embrace your shape and learn to love all its imperfections.
About Blog Wendy finds inspiration in art, nature, culture, architecture, food, people, and music. And for her, fashion is a compilation of all that. Fashion is a vehicle for her to play with shapes and colors in order to uncover her personal style. Even though she is inspired by images she see on the runways, she is more captivated by images she see on the streets.
Other commercially successful independent fashion blogs include Budget Fashionista, which reportedly brings in $600,000 a year in revenue[23] and The Bag Snob, which "generates a six-figure income, mainly from advertising". By 2008 SheFinds.com was generating $400,000 in revenue per year.[24] Personal style bloggers like Aimee Song from SongofStyle.com has told WWD that she gets paid anywhere from a couple thousand to 50,000 dollars for hosting an event or Instagramming a brand.[25]
Gray checked blazers took over the street style scene and our Instagram feeds this past season, but the trend is just getting started. Flourishing into full-on plaid, the print was everywhere from the runways to the street style set outside the shows. From colorful coats to menswear-inspired blazers to unexpected plaid accessories, there are endless ways to weave the trend into your wardrobe this year.

Los Angeles blogger and fashion influencer Julie Sarinana shares her personal style inspiration on "Sincerely Jules," a blog she launched when attending the Fashion Institute of Design & Merchandising. Julie has a laid back, approachable, Cali-girl style that often sees her mixing Gap with Gucci, and wearing vintage and flea market finds as well as items from mass retailers. Given her easy, casual approach to getting dressed, it makes sense that she also has her own line of screen print  t-shirts, printed with inspirational and humorous quotes. More »
About - I started this blog because I love clothes – thats obvious, right? I think that clothes and fashion are the best way to express yourself. An outfit says a lot more about a person than you’d think. I love sharing my daily outfits & makeup with all of you! I love to shop and I may or may not have a shopping problem (yikes!) but I figured I could at least turn that into something positive – by sharing my favorite fashion items with you!
And for an expert tip: Arabelle of Fashion Pirate attributes her inspiration to her friends, sharing, “it was their unintentional encouragement that got me to where I am today,” adding that, through the blogging process, she sees the most important change from start-to-finish as “the many friends [she’s] made from blogging, and the experiences [she’s] had with them.” So, bloggers, there's power in numbers.
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