It’s official: I’m wearing things that are a decade old. I’ve had both this ivory coat and camel sweater for a whopping 10 years. (Whoa!) I was inspired to wear them together by the colors on this plaid scarf, which I have quite the affinity for - check out 6 ways I’ve worn it, below. Lots of old things on the blog today but a new way to wear them together!
Hope you had a wonderful Thanksgiving! Loved connecting with many of you on social about some of the best holiday sales and promotions over the weekend. I’m excited to share another awesome find today - this bird print skirt which is on final clearance. (Only two sizes left - eek!) I couldn’t resist a print that is a prime opportunity to pair red and pink together, and the fact that it’s a bird print? Icing on the cake!
If you don’t pick out your clothing items carefully, you might end up fixing up your outfit every couple of minutes, unable to have any fun at all. Start by choosing shoes which are comfy, and coordinate your outfit with them. Make sure all items fit perfectly, so that nothing is slipping. Also, experts recommend carrying a sturdy chain bag, so your hands can remain free.
When In Doubt, Overdress: There's nothing worse than showing up an event underdressed. Maybe the invite didn't specify or involved the word casual — but everyone else dressed up not so casually. If you don't know what the dress code is, overdress. There's no harm in looking too pulled together, but you'll feel uncomfortable if you think you look out of place.
“You don’t have to spend an arm and a leg to look fantastic, however, we do tend to feel and act a little different when we wear things that are expensive. We treat those things differently too; with more care. We tell ourselves that they are special and that we are special when we wear them. But really it’s the mental story we assign to those items that make them special. Expensive things might trigger those feelings more easily but you can shine just as bright every day with ordinary things, just by acting as you would if they were expensive.” —Jennifer Lowe, stylist and designer for Water Vixen Swim    Learn some more ways you can use clothing to influence your mood.

Today I am 20. The Crucible, in which I play Mary Warren, opened at the Walter Kerr Theatre three weeks ago, March 31st—also the eight-year anniversary of this blog. I have a lot of trouble comprehending that writing Style Rookie led to writing for other places, then starting Rookie, then being able to audition for plays that I love and to be inside of them for long periods of time, which is an inexplicably wonderful way to live a life. But I am really really really insanely thankful for all of it, and many of you have followed for a LONG time, and that means a lot. Right now, I'm very slowly writing something that I hope will effectively articulate the strangeness of the way these all overlap—the fictions we get to try on via diary/blog-keeping, and acting, and personal style. But that's a longterm hermit project. I just wanted to mention it because in my attempt to briefly list recent stuff I've been up to, I may sound callous, but: None of this goes unexamined or unappreciated.

“Does this accentuate the best version of who I am as a woman?” Brother Vellies designer Aurora James asks this, before buying a vibrant animal-print coat or an over-the-top dress. “For me, I love things that have a ‘wow factor,’ so if I’m going to splurge and buy something, I want it to be the clothing version of myself,” James explains. It’s a brilliant trick for making sure that your purchase is something you’ll actually wear; if you feel like yourself in a piece of clothing, you’re more likely to gravitate towards it when it’s hanging in your closet.


There are different ways to avoid calluses, which can really make your day difficult. Most of those problems come from high heels, right? Up until now, I’ve tried different kinds of methods, and the most effective one includes the freezer, believe it or not. If you fill a couple of freezer bags with water, place them in your shoes, and put them into your freezer to stay overnight, you’ll be able to see a huge difference in the morning.
If Your Weight Changes A Lot, Update Your Wardrobe: This goes back to the point of not pretending things fit when they don't. It's important to make sure our clothing fits, and though it's hard to admit that you've gained weight (trust us, we struggle with this) or when you've lost weight, you can ignore the fact and stick with the same baggy clothes. Either way, it's kind of a fun reason to update your wardrobe.
One of the new season's most feminine trends came by way of bows. Losing its prissy connotations, they came in vibrant red at Valentino, and in sorbet shades at Emilia Wickstead and Erdem. They were particularly pervasive at London Fashion Week, where they adorned the backs of dresses at Wickstead, Preen and Delpozo. If following suit feels too saccharine, then tailor a polished ponytail with a bow instead like on the Emilia Wickstead catwalk, a look that's has already inspired Poppy Delevingne.
If you’re anything like me, one of your favorite pasttimes, amongst Netflix bingeing and cake baking, is looking at fashion blogs and borderline-stalking bloggers on their websites and social media accounts for outfit inspo. This is a great and enjoyable hobby to have, but can be disheartening if you’re a college student and can barely afford a Venti Starbucks, much less a Valentino purse. Most fashion blogs seem to be full of designer accessories and expensive jeans. But style is style, regardless of the price tag or brand, and whether you spend $5 or $500 on sunglasses, fashion is for all of us.

About Blog Wendy finds inspiration in art, nature, culture, architecture, food, people, and music. And for her, fashion is a compilation of all that. Fashion is a vehicle for her to play with shapes and colors in order to uncover her personal style. Even though she is inspired by images she see on the runways, she is more captivated by images she see on the streets.

Fashion blogs first appeared in the blogosphere prior to 2002.[16] Both the number of fashion blogs and the number of media mentions of fashion blogs has grown considerably since then. Published accounts of the growing number of fashion blogs are mentioned above, and a Facteva search reveals that media articles mentioning "fashion blogs" grew from one in 2002 to over 100 in 2006. 

Speaking of rules, we should mentioned those regarding showing skin. It’s pretty simple – show one body part at a time. So if you’re showing your cleavage, pay attention you’re not combining that with miniskirts, and the other way around. Looking and feeling attractive shouldn’t be based on how naked you are. A little bit of mystery is always a nice touch.
These are only a few marketing strategies to take into consideration. Ensure that you place a high value on social marketing because the imagery of a fashion blog works well on social media platforms. On top of that, social media and blogs account for 23% of internet users time spent online—and over 80% of all American’s frequent social media and blogs.

Lyn Slater has earned herself plenty of accolades and press (including from us at Who What Wear) for her vivacious spirit and similarly poised sense of style. Her blog, Accidental Icon, is aptly titled: Slater had a successful career as a university professor before she embarked on her blog, which started as a fun hobby and launched her into the sartorial stratosphere.
The title of Patti Gibbons's blog, Not Dead Yet, really says it all. She might be a woman in her 60s, but she's not dead yet—and she certainly doesn't dress as such. With a penchant for power prints and a commitment to wearing exactly what she feels like wearing, Gibbons has our stamp of approval (as well as that of outlets like The Huffington Post).

Tie-dye emerged as a fashion influencer favourite for summer 2018, and it's a look that was compounded on the catwalk. No longer solely the preserve of art teachers and ageing hippies, tie-dye has had a modern update, At Dior, the brand employed its meticulous craftsmanship to the process to create kaleidoscope versions, sometimes layering tie-dye over florals. Miuccia Prada went for a flouro approach, used to reflect a liberated woman. Stella McCartney's version came in blue and white boilersuits, T-shirts and combat trousers.

When In Doubt, Overdress: There's nothing worse than showing up an event underdressed. Maybe the invite didn't specify or involved the word casual — but everyone else dressed up not so casually. If you don't know what the dress code is, overdress. There's no harm in looking too pulled together, but you'll feel uncomfortable if you think you look out of place.
“Trust your gut, because sometimes friends give you the worst advice. If you don’t think your friend has the exact same style as you do, don’t shop with them,” warned Jennifer Fisher. The jeweler to the stars can usually be found shopping alone—both in stores or online—so she can clearly focus on what really works with her wardrobe and what she actually wants to buy.
Kathleen’s blog was created out of the realization that post-grad life wasn’t as fabulous as Carrie Bradshaw had led her to believe (even as adults, we’re still trying to solve the puzzle of how Carrie could afford a closet-full of Manolos on a writer’s salary). But looking at her inspiring outfits and picture-perfect lifestyle, you might have to disagree that it is extremely fabulous (except she pulls it all off with affordable pieces and doable outfit ideas).

“One of the most important things that people need to realize is that just because they buy something in their ‘size,’ doesn’t mean that it’s going to fit them. People get very invested in being a certain size but this is a huge mistake as different designers cut for different body types and also, many companies ‘play with size’ in order to flatter customers. Buy what fits, regardless of the number on the tag.” —Michael O’Connor, personal stylist
“Fashion shows are for transporting people,” Balenciaga designer Demna Gvasalia told Vogue this season, “otherwise there’s no point.” His show was one of the season’s most surreal transports. He compared working on a collection presentation to working on a movie, and in fact, it was Luc Besson’s studio on the outskirts of Paris where he held his show, in a digital tunnel that dripped, melted and swooped through a simulated reality. It was the work of the digital artist Jon Rafman, whom Gvasalia had met at Art Basel, and the effect was practically mind-melting, a digi-dystopia for an elegant but surreal collection.
Founder of Independent Fashion Blogger (IFB), Jennine Jacob, stated how thrilled she was to get the validation from high-end fashion designers (such as Proenza Schouler) that fashion blogging has an incredible impact on the fashion world. Imran Amed stated that there will always be designers and editors that will never fully wrap their head on the huge impact fashion blogging and social media has on the industry, but on the other side of the spectrum, there are numerous designers, editors, branders and writers that do understand and are “coming on board”. He also states that this is a fairly new phenomenon that will take time for fashion world to reap the full benefits.[4]
Fashion is a multibillion-dollar industry that has considerable impact on the way ordinary people dress and present themselves and relies heavily on media and advertising to communicate the producer's preferences and goals and influence public perception through various types of promotion; at the same time, fashion can be influenced by social change and counter-trends outside the producer, retailer or advertiser's control. As fashion is driven by trends within and without the fashion industry, fashion blogs and other "new media" outside the control of traditional establishment represent a disruptive innovation to the social dynamics of mass media and fashion consumption in modern consumer society. It is likely that the blogosphere will have a considerable long-term influence on the industry, as the number of fashion based blogs continue to grow, with increasing numbers of consumers able to create and modify the media that they consume, and traditional producers and advertisers adapting their practices to avoid dilution of their own influence.
How to actually do it: Strive to wear colors that enhance one another rather than "match" in the traditional sense. For an easy hack, says Minkoff, "look at a simple color wheel. The colors that are opposite each other on the wheel complement each other." (Think non-obvious but fetching combos, like orange and navy or purple and saffron.) Diversifying your accessories, in both color and texture, is another do. (A beloved trio from the vault of Betty Halbreich, a personal shopper at New York City's Bergdorf Goodman and the author of the style memoir I'll Drink to That: "A black dress, navy shoes, and a burgundy handbag.") And under no circumstances should you ever rock a suite of jewelry. Says Vazquez, " Anything that was sold together as a set looks really dated."
“When people are constantly chasing the next trend, they can look like they’re trying too hard. It’s better to have a true, individual sense of style and for those of us who are navigating between work, family, friends, and a social life, it comes down to balance. Dress simply and have great accent pieces.” —Ms. Morzin    Watch out for the things your boss wishes you’d stop wearing to work.
If you also purchased this sweater recently - or already had one like it in your closet - here’s another way to wear it! In my first outfit, I paired it with jeans, sneakers and hot pink accessories. This look is so different it hardly feels like the same sweater, and gives you even more bang for your buck by making it work for occasions beyond weekend casual. It’s written all over my face - this is such a fun, colorful look!
Fashion is a multibillion-dollar industry that has considerable impact on the way ordinary people dress and present themselves and relies heavily on media and advertising to communicate the producer's preferences and goals and influence public perception through various types of promotion; at the same time, fashion can be influenced by social change and counter-trends outside the producer, retailer or advertiser's control. As fashion is driven by trends within and without the fashion industry, fashion blogs and other "new media" outside the control of traditional establishment represent a disruptive innovation to the social dynamics of mass media and fashion consumption in modern consumer society. It is likely that the blogosphere will have a considerable long-term influence on the industry, as the number of fashion based blogs continue to grow, with increasing numbers of consumers able to create and modify the media that they consume, and traditional producers and advertisers adapting their practices to avoid dilution of their own influence.
When In Doubt, Overdress: There's nothing worse than showing up an event underdressed. Maybe the invite didn't specify or involved the word casual — but everyone else dressed up not so casually. If you don't know what the dress code is, overdress. There's no harm in looking too pulled together, but you'll feel uncomfortable if you think you look out of place. 

If Your Weight Changes A Lot, Update Your Wardrobe: This goes back to the point of not pretending things fit when they don't. It's important to make sure our clothing fits, and though it's hard to admit that you've gained weight (trust us, we struggle with this) or when you've lost weight, you can ignore the fact and stick with the same baggy clothes. Either way, it's kind of a fun reason to update your wardrobe.

With a new fashion blog launching seemingly every minute, there are more and more bloggers competing to influence your next outfit every day. But as you might have noticed, not all outfit posts are created equal. Searching for online fashion inspiration, it's not hard to fall into a rabbit hole of blogs, ending up wasting hours online, still with no real sense of what you should wear. That's why we've rounded up our favorite fashion bloggers, who stand out from the online pack thanks to their impeccable style sense, creativity, and individuality. For the best fashion advice out there, allow yourself to be influenced by the outfit posts by these fashion bloggers. 
I don't actually think these events really happened to me, but they'll still come to mind when I think back on a time when a secondhand event seemed to hold some kind of truth that reality did not. Example: I felt all weird and drifty at the beginning of last summer, and when I try and revisit that place, I don't literally imagine the view from behind a car windshield and how everything must look to the narrator in Yo La Tengo's "Today Is the Day," but I sure remember the exact sadness that it captured.
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