Great winter style really boils down to a great pair of boots. Got a great pair of over-the-knee boots? Show them off pairing them with a short dress. Have killer ankle boots you want to make sure the world gets to see? Pair them with cuffed jeans or a dress. And if it’s snowing and you are forced to wear less than fashionable snow boots? Use them as a jumping off point to put together a great new inventive outfit, rather than just throwing them on with just anything.
How to actually do it: "Where your breasts sit on your chest makes a big difference in how clothes fit," says Vazquez. In other words, if you're wearing a bra that fits properly, there will be no sagging or bulging—and that means your silhouette will look trimmer from every angle. The target is midway between your elbows and shoulders. You've scored a match when "the front center panel of the bra lays flat, there's no wrinkling or gapping in the cups, and the bra is not hiking up or creating bulges," says Kristen Supulski, the director of merchandising for Vanity Fair Brands lingerie. "If you can squeeze just two fingers under the band and it still feels snug, that's the perfect fit."
The ruffles perchance that dominated last summer will endure next year. For all those bored with languid, smooth shapes, cascades of frills subverted childlike associations this season. Simone Rocha's felt off-kilter, and Yves Saint Laurent's had a 1980s Prince appeal. Marc Jacobs, never one to buck to commercialism, designed his with dramatic flourishes and fantastical feathers.
Today I am 20. The Crucible, in which I play Mary Warren, opened at the Walter Kerr Theatre three weeks ago, March 31st—also the eight-year anniversary of this blog. I have a lot of trouble comprehending that writing Style Rookie led to writing for other places, then starting Rookie, then being able to audition for plays that I love and to be inside of them for long periods of time, which is an inexplicably wonderful way to live a life. But I am really really really insanely thankful for all of it, and many of you have followed for a LONG time, and that means a lot. Right now, I'm very slowly writing something that I hope will effectively articulate the strangeness of the way these all overlap—the fictions we get to try on via diary/blog-keeping, and acting, and personal style. But that's a longterm hermit project. I just wanted to mention it because in my attempt to briefly list recent stuff I've been up to, I may sound callous, but: None of this goes unexamined or unappreciated.
“I don’t recommend buying a highly trendy item for a lot of money because in just a few months it’s almost guaranteed to be on the ‘OUT’ list next year. One example this season are the embellished handbags. These fun bags with stars, hearts, moons, and beading can be super fun for some nights out but really shouldn’t be a big part of your fashion budget. I’d look to stores like Zara or Topshop for great versions at an affordable price.” —Mr. Hernandez
These memories worsen with time. The original events often occur in adolescence, are usually social interactions, and, at worst, were intended to be romantic. One remedy is to frequently remind yourself that you won't have to live with your humiliation forever because MORTALITY. Or that our perception of reality is pretty inaccurate no matter what (see: Chris Ware; the tiny stoner I quoted earlier). Or that technically — TECHNICALLY — we have no way of knowing for sure that any of this is happening AT ALL. You could also just watch Freaks and Geeks.
Know Your Arch: Shoe shopping? Make sure you know your arch type. In an interview with the folks at The Fashion Spot, Erica Lynn Stanley, design director of ...me Too shoes, said the best way to determine your arch is to step on a piece of paper after wetting the bottom of your foot. You can determine whether you have a normal, flat or high arch by examining your wet footprint. If the middle part of your footprint doesn't show up, you have a high arch, but if you can see most of your footprint then you have a fairly flat arch. Your arch is normal if you see half of your wet footprint. Source:The Fashion Spot 

When In Doubt, Overdress: There's nothing worse than showing up an event underdressed. Maybe the invite didn't specify or involved the word casual — but everyone else dressed up not so casually. If you don't know what the dress code is, overdress. There's no harm in looking too pulled together, but you'll feel uncomfortable if you think you look out of place.
To play it safe, combine a neutral, like flax, with something bolder, like yellow. But think twice about pairing intense hues with black, which "can look dated," says designer Chris Benz. For something punchier, try two colors that are beside each other on the color wheel, such as coral and orange. Not sure where to begin? "Notice what colors you love and respond to in your decor," says Benz.
Lyn Slater has earned herself plenty of accolades and press (including from us at Who What Wear) for her vivacious spirit and similarly poised sense of style. Her blog, Accidental Icon, is aptly titled: Slater had a successful career as a university professor before she embarked on her blog, which started as a fun hobby and launched her into the sartorial stratosphere.
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A sloppily cuffed jean. An ill-fitting blazer. A dress that shows just a little too much to be referred to as "tastefully sheer." These are the things that fashion editors and stylists can spot from a million miles away. To those in the biz, the proper proportions of a crop top may be obvious, but for those seeing the trends in a magazine or online, it can be a little trickier to know exactly how to wear everything.
But beyond your typical publishing schedule, pay attention to popular events and see if you can opportunistically pick up extra Google search and Twitter traffic. For example, when it was broadcasted everywhere last year that Pippa Middleton was wearing pantyhose out and about in London, I jumped in. I wrote a piece about how much I dislike pantyhose, even if fashion’s It Girl was sporting them—and thus capitalized on a newly trending topic. Because I was so quick to react, my blog received a spike in traffic from people looking for articles about Pippa’s fashion statement.
Camille Charriere is an enviably chic Parisian expat now based in London, where she photographs her daily outfit to inspire her many fans. Camille's style is definitely informed by a French fashion sensibility, and she has a genius flair for mixing structured basics (such as a tweed blazer or white t-shirt) with more glamorous separates (say, a satin midi-length skirt). You can use the "Store" link on her site to shop Camille's actual looks via Instagram, so you can recreate her effortlessly stylish outfits. More »
2) Converting traffic – Publish a weekly newsletter once a week. Keep it brief and share 1 tip each week. This has worked really well for me to build up a relationship with my readers and drives sales of my online app courses. When people email to thank you for free info shared to your mailing list, and converted to buying paid courses based on this, you are on the right track.
How to actually do it: The right pair of earrings can flatter your face shape. For instance, long earrings make your face look skinnier, if it’s on the round side, says jewelry designer Lizzie Fortunato. On the other hand, if you have an oblong face, short, chunky earrings, like oversize studs, will draw focus outward, and your face won't read quite as narrow. If you have a large bust, a necklace should hit an inch above the cleavage or higher. Longer strands or pendants will rest awkwardly on the body and call attention to every contour. Lastly, choose earrings in lighter colors, such as pearls or white stone, to make your face look radiant.

The New York Times "Style" section writer, Eric Wilson, did an extensive study on the impact of fashion bloggers on the fashion industry for one of his style columns. Wilson wrote that these bloggers have ascended ‘from the nosebleed seats to the front row’ in the past year and that the divide between the ‘high code’ editors with a professional opinion and the ‘amateur’ fashion bloggers is beginning to disintegrate. Wilson interviewed prominent publicists, editors and designers. Publicist Kelly Cutrone stated that over the past two years, there has been a complete change in who is writing about fashion. Not only does Cutrone say she needs to keep a watch on the editors of mainstream writings, such as Vogue and Elle, but now she needs to monitor on the millions of fashion bloggers around the world. Cutrone goes on the later state that once these bloggers post anything on the internet, it never comes off, and it now becomes the first thing that the designers will see.[5]
"Never underestimate the power of good accessories. Many a plain outfit has been saved by the addition of a scarf, belt, or piece of jewelry. I also recommend sticking to one focal point accessory. For example, if you're wearing a big statement necklace, keep your earrings small or skip them altogether." —Submitted by Christina Szirmai (via Facebook)
It’s official: I’m wearing things that are a decade old. I’ve had both this ivory coat and camel sweater for a whopping 10 years. (Whoa!) I was inspired to wear them together by the colors on this plaid scarf, which I have quite the affinity for - check out 6 ways I’ve worn it, below. Lots of old things on the blog today but a new way to wear them together!
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