“Not enough people have heard of decision fatigue. Decision fatigue is the result of making too many decisions during the course of the day. All of these little decisions add up and actually drain the brain of decision-making power later on. So don’t waste your brainpower in the morning trying to get dressed. Instead get rid of things you can’t or don’t wear regularly and simplify your wardrobe to pieces you like. Keep your clothing simple, so you will have the energy to tackle life’s tougher problems.” —Dan Moyer Jr., stylist and national director of social media for Closet Factory   You should finally get rid of these articles of clothing and accessories in your closet.
Today is the last day of 2017. This was a crazy and unforgettable year of my life. I’m so grateful for everything that happened (even the bad things), all the people I’ve met and all the things that are going to happen in 2018. Love you all and thank you for always supporting me ♥️ #blessed #bye2017 #🌴 #🇧🇷 #🧜🏽‍♀️ photo by one of my faves of 2017 @marianne_fonseca 🌊
I don't actually think these events really happened to me, but they'll still come to mind when I think back on a time when a secondhand event seemed to hold some kind of truth that reality did not. Example: I felt all weird and drifty at the beginning of last summer, and when I try and revisit that place, I don't literally imagine the view from behind a car windshield and how everything must look to the narrator in Yo La Tengo's "Today Is the Day," but I sure remember the exact sadness that it captured.
On the flip side, this option is “free”, but is going to take more time on your end. Before you reach out to an expert for advice, make sure you do your homework. Experts are often busy people. Make sure you search if they answered the questions you want to ask before. Skim through their blogs, Twitter, check if they’ve been interviewed on a podcast or magazine. If you can’t find the answer you’re looking for, only then should you consider reaching out to them. For that, I highly recommend reading this post: “How to get the attention of your favorite expert”
Consider this your ultimate guide to fashion blogging. We’ve enlisted the help of some of our favorites — from Tavi Gevinson to Chiara Ferragni and more — who have not only figured out how to make their love of fashion and style a true lifestyle, but also how to make money sharing what they love with all of us. Read on for all of their tips and tricks you need to know before starting a fashion blog yourself.
If you don’t pick out your clothing items carefully, you might end up fixing up your outfit every couple of minutes, unable to have any fun at all. Start by choosing shoes which are comfy, and coordinate your outfit with them. Make sure all items fit perfectly, so that nothing is slipping. Also, experts recommend carrying a sturdy chain bag, so your hands can remain free.
“Many of us already own plenty of clothes, we just need to use them in new ways to make them feel fresh and interesting. Trying making new outfits by mixing what’s already in your closet in new and unexpected ways, like mixing patterns. Pair that polka dot top with that floral skirt, or that striped top with those animal print pants.” —Ms. Jimenez    These simple tips will help you save money on clothes (without sacrificing style).
It's a little awkward, so we'll get straight to the point: This Thursday we humbly ask you to protect Wikipedia's independence. We depend on donations averaging about $16.36, but 99% of our readers don't give. If everyone reading this gave $3, we could keep Wikipedia thriving for years to come. The price of your Thursday coffee is all we need. When we made Wikipedia a non-profit, people warned us we'd regret it. But if Wikipedia became commercial, it would be a great loss to the world. Wikipedia is a place to learn, not a place for advertising. It unites all of us who love knowledge: contributors, readers and the donors who keep us thriving. The heart and soul of Wikipedia is a community of people working to bring you unlimited access to reliable, neutral information. Please take a minute to help us keep Wikipedia growing. Thank you.
I just entered this whole blogging world and your website is saving my life – well, that’s a bit extreme. But yes. My life is being saved. There are so many clear, witty explanations of how and why I need to do particular things that I *could* spend all day simply pouring over the info you provide. But I won’t. Because you taught me that I was avoiding actually creating content. I am now in the process of figuring out how to do a good logo and the last comment I read addressed that very problem. Fantastic! Now I’m off to purchase and figure out Aweber. Ta!
“Many of us already own plenty of clothes, we just need to use them in new ways to make them feel fresh and interesting. Trying making new outfits by mixing what’s already in your closet in new and unexpected ways, like mixing patterns. Pair that polka dot top with that floral skirt, or that striped top with those animal print pants.” —Ms. Jimenez    These simple tips will help you save money on clothes (without sacrificing style).

Hi! I'm editor-in-chief of Rookie, a website for teenage girls that I founded in 2011. Every year we put out a book that compiles the best content from that year of the site. Our most recent is Rookie Yearbook Three, published by Razorbill. It is just over 350 pages, and in addition to loads of beautiful artwork and writing are print-exclusives like stickers, valentines, a Rookie pennant, and contributions from the likes of Dakota and Elle Fanning, Shailene Woodley, Lorde, Grimes, Kelis, Sia, Broad City, Bob's Burgers, and more.
Designers went big on all things animalia. For fall, we saw heavy coats and structured jackets in leopard spots and zebra stripes, but for spring, it is all in the unique animal-print details. We loved JW Anderson’s puff leopard-print sleeves and Richard Quinn’s excessive over-the-top take on spots, while Burberry’s mix of zebra on the top and spots on the bottom felt fun and fresh.
What this style absolutely excludes is anything that’s official, taken from business looks or other subcultures. All the rest is welcome. Casual style is suitable for every woman with any type of figure, which is also very important. An example of this style can be an interesting top, some minimalistic shorts, a creative handbag, and a light scarf.
These memories worsen with time. The original events often occur in adolescence, are usually social interactions, and, at worst, were intended to be romantic. One remedy is to frequently remind yourself that you won't have to live with your humiliation forever because MORTALITY. Or that our perception of reality is pretty inaccurate no matter what (see: Chris Ware; the tiny stoner I quoted earlier). Or that technically — TECHNICALLY — we have no way of knowing for sure that any of this is happening AT ALL. You could also just watch Freaks and Geeks.
With a whole new year upon us, many will be thinking about how to revamp their wardrobe or look throughout 2013. But with so many bits of advice floating around the Internet, it can be hard to figure out what tips to focus on. Should you follow the trends or define your own sense of style? Is mending your clothes necessary or should you look to a tailor for help?
The New York Times "Style" section writer, Eric Wilson, did an extensive study on the impact of fashion bloggers on the fashion industry for one of his style columns. Wilson wrote that these bloggers have ascended ‘from the nosebleed seats to the front row’ in the past year and that the divide between the ‘high code’ editors with a professional opinion and the ‘amateur’ fashion bloggers is beginning to disintegrate. Wilson interviewed prominent publicists, editors and designers. Publicist Kelly Cutrone stated that over the past two years, there has been a complete change in who is writing about fashion. Not only does Cutrone say she needs to keep a watch on the editors of mainstream writings, such as Vogue and Elle, but now she needs to monitor on the millions of fashion bloggers around the world. Cutrone goes on the later state that once these bloggers post anything on the internet, it never comes off, and it now becomes the first thing that the designers will see.[5]
And for an expert tip: Arabelle of Fashion Pirate attributes her inspiration to her friends, sharing, “it was their unintentional encouragement that got me to where I am today,” adding that, through the blogging process, she sees the most important change from start-to-finish as “the many friends [she’s] made from blogging, and the experiences [she’s] had with them.” So, bloggers, there's power in numbers.
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