“Fashion” is a broad term used to describe many genres of clothing and accessories. Before you get started it is essential to select your area of expertise. This needs to be more detailed than writing a blog that appeals to men, women, teens, or children—but instead, you must focus on a specific niche within the industry. The area of expertise you select will be used to help create your marketing strategy, website URL, and website design. For example, you could select:
“Are you a boho gal who loves kale salads, yoga sessions, and beaded jewelry? Or are you a preppy woman, who loves anything from Kate Spade and has a penchant for stripes? Ask yourself what image you want to project, and how you would want people to describe you based on first impressions. The truth is they are already thinking something about you when they meet you so make sure it’s what you want!” —Christina-Lauren Pollack, fashion expert and Editor of Inspirations & Celebrations     Next, check out these styling tricks that can help you revamp your wardrobe in a weekend.
Know Your Colours: Know which colours will flatter you the most by figuring out if the undertones in your skin are either warm or cold. The experts at The Fashion Spot say women with cool undertones look best in white, black, gray, silver, and shades of blue. Women with warm undertones will be dazzling in shades of yellow, gold, brown, green and red. Source: The Fashion Spot
About Blog Kat Tanita is one of the fastest rising fashion and travel influencers in the world. While working in the fashion industry, Kat began blogging as a creative outlet – sharing her personal, style, beauty, and travel musings on With Love From Kat. She has been featured in numerous publications including Elle, Harper’s Bazaar, Marie Claire, and The Wall Street Journal.
Are you ready to embrace your dark side? If so, make like the street style stars of Spring/Summer 2019 Fashion Month and try a neo-gothic look. To wear the trend, follow their lead and pair an all-over black ensemble with on-trend pieces. Essentially, you can wear what you like, but remember to keep the overall vibe dark and moody with a chic twist. Also, consider adding a dark red lip for a sexy touch.
Dress Your Age: Janice Dickinson doesn't look 57, but she is. We're not going to lie, she looks great, but let's face it, it's a tad tacky when 50-somethings try sporting an outfit you'd normally find on 20-somethings — and vice versa. However, tinsel town allows celebrities more leeway than the real world does for us ordinary folk. As a rule of thumb, stick to age appropriate attire.
On the flip side, this option is “free”, but is going to take more time on your end. Before you reach out to an expert for advice, make sure you do your homework. Experts are often busy people. Make sure you search if they answered the questions you want to ask before. Skim through their blogs, Twitter, check if they’ve been interviewed on a podcast or magazine. If you can’t find the answer you’re looking for, only then should you consider reaching out to them. For that, I highly recommend reading this post: “How to get the attention of your favorite expert”
If you also purchased this sweater recently - or already had one like it in your closet - here’s another way to wear it! In my first outfit, I paired it with jeans, sneakers and hot pink accessories. This look is so different it hardly feels like the same sweater, and gives you even more bang for your buck by making it work for occasions beyond weekend casual. It’s written all over my face - this is such a fun, colorful look!
3. Give “them” a “package deal”. If you have a taste for looking good, why not pass that gift on to others? Many (i mean it) people who follow fashion blogs have very little fashion sense, so if you provide them with something like a good looking outfit, they will be more prone to share/like/follow. I’m not saying give away $200 jeans; i mean put those clothes together (on yourself or just laid out), snap a picture, and put it up as “the outfit for the day” or whatever. You can even geo-target this and base the outfit on the weather (or whatever).

“Fashion shows are for transporting people,” Balenciaga designer Demna Gvasalia told Vogue this season, “otherwise there’s no point.” His show was one of the season’s most surreal transports. He compared working on a collection presentation to working on a movie, and in fact, it was Luc Besson’s studio on the outskirts of Paris where he held his show, in a digital tunnel that dripped, melted and swooped through a simulated reality. It was the work of the digital artist Jon Rafman, whom Gvasalia had met at Art Basel, and the effect was practically mind-melting, a digi-dystopia for an elegant but surreal collection.
Not long ago, a reader (I’ll call her Kelly) has shared with me about how frustrated she felt and how unlucky she was. Kelly’s an aspiring entrepreneur. She had been trying to find investors to invest in her project. It hadn’t been going well as she was always rejected by the potential investors. And at her most stressful time, her boyfriend broke up with her. And the day after her breakup, she missed an important opportunity to meet an interested investor. She was about to give up because she felt that she’d not be lucky enough to build her business successfully.
There was a refreshing shift on the runways this season, and it had little to do with the clothes and everything to do with the casting. While plenty of new faces graced the catwalks as usual, the real surprise was the reappearance of some of the greatest models of the ’90s. Yasmin Le Bon walked at Calvin Klein, Stella Tennant and Georgina Grenville starred at Ferragamo, and Shalom Harlow — who hasn’t set foot on the runway in years — closed Versace (in a floral lace gown and a cloud of her natural ringlets). These women added to the shows a kind of diversity that has been lacking: a range of ages. They also lent strength to the collections, thanks in part to their walks: the powerful, showstopping strides of the original supermodels. — MALINA JOSEPH GILCHRIST, style director, women’s, T magazine
Why: The leggy blonde provides a tres chic mix of outfit inspiration – her personal style definitely has that insouciant French vibe – and trend and brand lowdowns. The ‘boutique’ section of her site is a one-stop shop for the pieces she loves – and we also like the fact she has regular wardrobe clearouts via Vestiaire so true Camille-alikes can snap up her actual clothes…
As a business woman, you likely are smart with how you spend your money. There are certainly ways to penny pinch, but your business wardrobe is not one of them. Though the cost may seem like a lot up front, in reality you’ll get a lot of bang for your buck. If the item is high-quality, you’ll be able to wear it many times over many years, making the cost per wear low.
Fashion blogs first appeared in the blogosphere prior to 2002.[16] Both the number of fashion blogs and the number of media mentions of fashion blogs has grown considerably since then. Published accounts of the growing number of fashion blogs are mentioned above, and a Facteva search reveals that media articles mentioning "fashion blogs" grew from one in 2002 to over 100 in 2006.

If you always wear jeans, try swapping them out for a dress one day per week; if you’re a fan of flats, slip into a pair of heels every Friday night. Getting out of your comfort zone is a good way to challenge yourself, in both the sartorial and self-confidence department. “I try to pick one silhouette each season that’s new to add to my wardrobe,” Fisher explained. She prefers wearing pants, so this year, she’s trying out more skirts and dresses—and has even learned a lesson from this experiment: “I find skirts and dresses much easier to put together at 6AM in the morning!”
The past few years have been dauntingly magical, with many thanks to supporters of Rookie and of the other odds and ends listed here, and I'm just at an interesting time right now in figuring out what's next. Thanks for sticking around, coming by for a first time, what have you -- I know I said last spring that I was trying to let go of my need to document, but I figured out in writing the Forever letter:
Why: Of Turkish/Iranian Jewish descent, Medine kicked off her career with a blog called Boogers + Bagels. Her ironic fashion-addict asides soon had her readers rolling in the aisles, and she decided to focus on the topic full-time after a joky conversation while out shopping with a friend about how ‘man-repelling’ all the fashion-forward outfits they loved were. It’s now a male-scaring empire, providing in-depth intel: ‘The difference between Mom Jeans and Dad Jeans’, the fabulous ‘Manstagram’ – all the best fash items du jour – and fun features and style news aplenty.
Know Your Arch: Shoe shopping? Make sure you know your arch type. In an interview with the folks at The Fashion Spot, Erica Lynn Stanley, design director of ...me Too shoes, said the best way to determine your arch is to step on a piece of paper after wetting the bottom of your foot. You can determine whether you have a normal, flat or high arch by examining your wet footprint. If the middle part of your footprint doesn't show up, you have a high arch, but if you can see most of your footprint then you have a fairly flat arch. Your arch is normal if you see half of your wet footprint. Source:The Fashion Spot
Just as we’re settling into the fall groove of checks and plaids, the Spring 2019 season has officially come to a close. And while there were a few overarching ideas to the season, there is truly a trend or a must-have item for everyone. One idea that seemed to resonate with many designers (and showgoers) was that of escapism. At Chloé, Loewe, and Paco Rabanne, the Spring 2019 girl has run off to Ibiza, where she is wearing patchwork textures and layers and using seashells and found objects as jewelry. It's the type of girl who always packs a favorite crochet dress or tie-dye T-shirt that she will throw over her maillot before heading to the beach. On the opposite end of the spectrum, we're seeing all-out '80s, an idea rooted more in the city streets and Hollywood. Eighties acid-washed denim, especially at Proenza Schouler, has officially made its comeback, as have graphic-art prints, as seen at Louis Vuitton. Animal prints are still having a major moment, as are feathers and fringe, which first made a big splash last spring. And while many are still lamenting the loss of Phoebe Philo's Céline, many labels are stepping up to fill in the void. Great suiting appeared all over the runways, including at brands where we are used to seeing more feminine pieces. The classic trench, a signature for minimalists and Philo-philes, is still a runway mainstay, and we saw many clever iterations at Riccardo Tisci's Burberry debut. But aside from a trench or a suit, the item to buy this spring is a pair of shorts. While many street-style stars got a head start on the bike-short revival we saw at Fendi, capri-length tailored shorts, as well as cargo shorts, are clearly the new skirt. For all of Spring 2019's best fashion trends, scroll below.

The segment of bloggers in their 30s, 40s, 50s, and beyond may be small, but it's mighty. We aim to enlighten you, dear reader, about the ladies of all ages who are killing the fashion-blogging game at the moment—from the 25-year-old whippersnappers to the 65-year-olds who've been at it for a good while longer. Prepare to be majorly inspired by all the women showing off their unique (and frankly, fun) looks. Keep scrolling to meet the best fashion bloggers of every age group!


As we get ready to usher in a new year, it's also time to usher in a new set of trends. According to the runways, the street style scene, and the best dressed A-listers, these are the emerging fashion trends to watch in 2018. Whether your resolution is to take more style risks or hone in on your wardrobe, these are the looks to weave into your wardrobe. Plus, the trends it's time to retire (for now). 

Designers went big on all things animalia. For fall, we saw heavy coats and structured jackets in leopard spots and zebra stripes, but for spring, it is all in the unique animal-print details. We loved JW Anderson’s puff leopard-print sleeves and Richard Quinn’s excessive over-the-top take on spots, while Burberry’s mix of zebra on the top and spots on the bottom felt fun and fresh.

Mason, who writes a monthly column for Marie Claire and designed her own collection for Modcloth last fall, is one of the most in-demand bloggers working right now. The 29-year-old writer played a role in the promotion and social media around Target's new plus-size collection Ava & Viv and is also a budding TV personality, offering style advice on programs including "Today" and "Good Morning America." Mason is notable because she uses her blog as a platform to discuss bigger social issues, including race, sexuality and body image. 
Another great variant of the casual look is the combination of the simple gray coat topping a sassy tight fitting dress and flat shoes or options on heels. Or else, you can combine a strict skirt with a minimalistic jacket or a blouse, or just spice up the look with a leather jacket, finishing all off with stilettos or just high heels. Multi-layered and complicated ensembles are the best way to create ideal casual combinations.

A significant section of the blog is “Outfits,” and this predominantly features what Grasie wears in her daily activities. The posts are highly visual, with captions describing the outfits worn, often explaining why Grasie likes and wears particular items. She generally includes links to sites where her fans can buy items to emulate her look, often giving alternatives in various price ranges.

If Your Weight Changes A Lot, Update Your Wardrobe: This goes back to the point of not pretending things fit when they don't. It's important to make sure our clothing fits, and though it's hard to admit that you've gained weight (trust us, we struggle with this) or when you've lost weight, you can ignore the fact and stick with the same baggy clothes. Either way, it's kind of a fun reason to update your wardrobe.


Nothing comes back the same way, and the jumpsuit of 2017 is not necessarily the same as a version from the '70s. Check out the difference in Raquel Welch's and Tilda Swinton's jumpsuits. There are subtle design tweaks that make any revival slightly different from the original. Does that piece from your "archive" really work now? Ask a trusted friend for a second opinion.
For the 2016 Pirelli Calendar, Annie Leibovitz chose to photograph women whose achievements demonstrate a different kind of beauty from what the calendar has traditionally showcased. I'm still shocked to be included among so many people who've long influenced not just my work, but how I see the world, and try to see myself. Annie photographed me one year earlier in the pink velvet dress I'd originally bought for prom, in my parents' backyard. At that time, it was still my backyard, too, and had functioned since I was a little kid as a personal photo studio, study, and consistent reminder that I was bigger than I had been the year before, and the year before that, and that this would only keep happening. (I'm still v short, but: relatively speaking.) It was where I learned that as your childhood shrinks around you, so will your sense of wonder, unless you choose to pay close attention to what surrounds you at new heights. When Annie shot me for Pirelli, we were just a few blocks from my new home in NYC. A lot happens in that first year, and not knowing the geography of the city makes every encounter feel totally isolated from the rest of the world, like a castle on a cloud. At the time of this shoot, I was parsing what in this year had seemed significant just because it was new, and then what was enriching. I was exhausted by the sheen, and desperate to develop a kind of discernment which would make me so healthy, so OK with myself, that genuine wonder would return--gravitation towards stuff that isn't just shiny, but illuminates the same sorts of truths I'd learned as a fan of Patti, Yoko, and other women who happen to be in this calendar, too. I decided to cut my hair on the shoot, rid myself of any excess. Annie made me feel completely comfortable, like I was the same person as the year before, but indeed older. Again, still very physically short. My foot is peeking out of that shoe. I urge you to look at the other portraits, all so stunning, bold & nearly impossible to turn away from. They are strongest as a group, but I wanted to share what mine means to me and thank you for following what I do in such a way that has allowed for this to happen.
There are tons of style bloggers out there today—but just like anything fabulous, there’s definitely room for more. In fact, it probably won’t be long before having a blog is a prerequisite for getting a job in the fashion industry. After all, it’s a form of networking—a way to showcase your style, position yourself as an expert, and get known in the fashion world.

WHAT YOU CAN DO TODAY: Go to a store that you would consider out of your budget. A place that might even be uncomfortably expensive for you. You don’t have to buy anything. Just walk around, touch the clothes. Maybe even try something on. Make mental note of how things fit, feel, and how you feel wearing it. Then go to a fast fashion shop like Zara or H&M and try similar items on. Make note of what’s different and what’s similar. Anything surprising?


I don't actually think these events really happened to me, but they'll still come to mind when I think back on a time when a secondhand event seemed to hold some kind of truth that reality did not. Example: I felt all weird and drifty at the beginning of last summer, and when I try and revisit that place, I don't literally imagine the view from behind a car windshield and how everything must look to the narrator in Yo La Tengo's "Today Is the Day," but I sure remember the exact sadness that it captured.
For the 2016 Pirelli Calendar, Annie Leibovitz chose to photograph women whose achievements demonstrate a different kind of beauty from what the calendar has traditionally showcased. I'm still shocked to be included among so many people who've long influenced not just my work, but how I see the world, and try to see myself. Annie photographed me one year earlier in the pink velvet dress I'd originally bought for prom, in my parents' backyard. At that time, it was still my backyard, too, and had functioned since I was a little kid as a personal photo studio, study, and consistent reminder that I was bigger than I had been the year before, and the year before that, and that this would only keep happening. (I'm still v short, but: relatively speaking.) It was where I learned that as your childhood shrinks around you, so will your sense of wonder, unless you choose to pay close attention to what surrounds you at new heights. When Annie shot me for Pirelli, we were just a few blocks from my new home in NYC. A lot happens in that first year, and not knowing the geography of the city makes every encounter feel totally isolated from the rest of the world, like a castle on a cloud. At the time of this shoot, I was parsing what in this year had seemed significant just because it was new, and then what was enriching. I was exhausted by the sheen, and desperate to develop a kind of discernment which would make me so healthy, so OK with myself, that genuine wonder would return--gravitation towards stuff that isn't just shiny, but illuminates the same sorts of truths I'd learned as a fan of Patti, Yoko, and other women who happen to be in this calendar, too. I decided to cut my hair on the shoot, rid myself of any excess. Annie made me feel completely comfortable, like I was the same person as the year before, but indeed older. Again, still very physically short. My foot is peeking out of that shoe. I urge you to look at the other portraits, all so stunning, bold & nearly impossible to turn away from. They are strongest as a group, but I wanted to share what mine means to me and thank you for following what I do in such a way that has allowed for this to happen.
A sloppily cuffed jean. An ill-fitting blazer. A dress that shows just a little too much to be referred to as "tastefully sheer." These are the things that fashion editors and stylists can spot from a million miles away. To those in the biz, the proper proportions of a crop top may be obvious, but for those seeing the trends in a magazine or online, it can be a little trickier to know exactly how to wear everything.

Why: Since stumbling across this gorgeous blog, our lives have been so much more colourful. Jess goes beyond the standard #OOTD posts and her site’s a sartorial treasure trove full of styling advice, galleries and even some tips for budding bloggers if you’re thinking of making this list some day. Her masterfully saturated and unique photography is what sets her apart from the rest of the pack and we still can’t stop thinking about her guide to wearing colour this spring…

Organize Your Closet: Organize your closet. This way you'll be able to see what you own (and actually wear it). Separate your clothes by garment. Figure out what what can be folded neatly and what needs to be hanged. Make sure you get the right hangers for shirts, skirts and pants. Use storage shelves to store your purses and intimates and buy a shoe rack. For more detailed instructions on how to tackle this task, check out what our friends at Lucky Magazine have to say. Source: Lucky Magazine
Do we have Ines de la Fressange to thank for the ubiquity of “French girl style?” The author of “La Parisienne,” she might be responsible for defining exactly what “chic” means for a generation of wannabe French girls. These days, she’s one of the top fashion Instagram influencers who regularly collaborates with the brand Uniqlo to produce limited-edition collections, and managing her own lines.

I'm not saying that you have to be perfect all the time. It's absolutely fine to make mistakes, because it's sometimes the only way for you to learn and improve your style. I encourage you to get to know yourself better, simply by exposing yourself to new styles and clothes. Experimenting and having fun with fashion is the key to evolving your style.
Sporty surf looks were prevalent throughout the season. Perhaps the most major runway moment was at up-and-coming designer Marine Serre’s show, where she created couturelike looks out of neoprene commonly used for wetsuits. Also picking up on this surf trend was CALVIN KLEIN 205W39NYC, with a scuba-inspired ensemble, and Etro, where the model even toted around a printed surfboard. The surf look was even given a luxe makeover by Hermès, where a neoprene swimsuit was layered under a chic leather skirt.
If Your Weight Changes A Lot, Update Your Wardrobe: This goes back to the point of not pretending things fit when they don't. It's important to make sure our clothing fits, and though it's hard to admit that you've gained weight (trust us, we struggle with this) or when you've lost weight, you can ignore the fact and stick with the same baggy clothes. Either way, it's kind of a fun reason to update your wardrobe.
If you don’t pick out your clothing items carefully, you might end up fixing up your outfit every couple of minutes, unable to have any fun at all. Start by choosing shoes which are comfy, and coordinate your outfit with them. Make sure all items fit perfectly, so that nothing is slipping. Also, experts recommend carrying a sturdy chain bag, so your hands can remain free.
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