Know Your Arch: Shoe shopping? Make sure you know your arch type. In an interview with the folks at The Fashion Spot, Erica Lynn Stanley, design director of ...me Too shoes, said the best way to determine your arch is to step on a piece of paper after wetting the bottom of your foot. You can determine whether you have a normal, flat or high arch by examining your wet footprint. If the middle part of your footprint doesn't show up, you have a high arch, but if you can see most of your footprint then you have a fairly flat arch. Your arch is normal if you see half of your wet footprint. Source:The Fashion Spot
Can we all stop fiddling with our smartphone filters and beautification apps for a minute? It’s time for a healthy heaping of irreverence, gratitude and common sense. First off, thank you to Spanx for creating shapewear arm tights that compress upper-arm dangle (but we've got it covered); New York Fashion Week for giving models over age 50 a record 10 runway appearances out of 2,601 (but you can do better); and France for passing a law stating all altered advertising photos must carry a "retouched" warning (but we know a fake when we see it — from a phony Chanel bag to a filler-enhanced face). Instead, here are 10 age-positive ways to start the holiday season.
Dress For Women, Not For Men:The Man Repeller once told us that if women dressed for men, we'd all be wearing bodycon miniskirts and dresses. This is why we have to dress with other women in mind. It actually makes getting dressed easier when you're dressing for style, not for sex, and your confidence will shine through because you'll be more comfortable in what you're wearing. 

Consider this your ultimate guide to fashion blogging. We’ve enlisted the help of some of our favorites — from Tavi Gevinson to Chiara Ferragni and more — who have not only figured out how to make their love of fashion and style a true lifestyle, but also how to make money sharing what they love with all of us. Read on for all of their tips and tricks you need to know before starting a fashion blog yourself.
Founder of Independent Fashion Blogger (IFB), Jennine Jacob, stated how thrilled she was to get the validation from high-end fashion designers (such as Proenza Schouler) that fashion blogging has an incredible impact on the fashion world. Imran Amed stated that there will always be designers and editors that will never fully wrap their head on the huge impact fashion blogging and social media has on the industry, but on the other side of the spectrum, there are numerous designers, editors, branders and writers that do understand and are “coming on board”. He also states that this is a fairly new phenomenon that will take time for fashion world to reap the full benefits.[4]
Knowing your readership also helps you select the best theme. Not only will you have a better idea what to choose, but you’ll also be able to provide something that’s consistent with your industry’s standards and current trends. Conversely, if you are an extremely creative person, you could go against the grain and choose something that will set a new fashion!
Athleisure is the trend that keeps giving, and its latest offering is as unexpected as it is stylish. The bike shorts were worn with blazers by many style-savvy showgoers this fashion month. Offering a fresh blend of sportswear and tailoring, the look was both striking and chic. Of course, while it may not be appropriate for either the office or the gym, the outfit is perfect for strutting the streets or attending Sunday brunch with your best friends. So, don’t be afraid to try it for yourself.
It may seem contradictory to the current sociopolitical climate that the sexy and glamorous ’80s are back, but they are—although not in a Krystle Carrington of “Dynasty,” or Madonna circa “Holiday” sort of way. This time around, the way to do the ’80s is to choose one or two pieces or one accent color to get the vibe. Think pops of bright color, rather than an entire outfit in a shocking bright shade.
Personal style bloggers sometimes get a bad rap -- caricatured as pretty, brainless girls who dress up for their camera-wielding boyfriends and post their results to a WordPress blog. But over the past decade, these independent publishers have become a real force in the fashion industry -- not just snapping up front row seats at fashion shows, but landing major campaigns and collaborations with brands, becoming regular guests on TV shows like "Today" and "America's Next Top Model," and turning their blogs into multimillion-dollar businesses. Some have become household names.
The segment of bloggers in their 30s, 40s, 50s, and beyond may be small, but it's mighty. We aim to enlighten you, dear reader, about the ladies of all ages who are killing the fashion-blogging game at the moment—from the 25-year-old whippersnappers to the 65-year-olds who've been at it for a good while longer. Prepare to be majorly inspired by all the women showing off their unique (and frankly, fun) looks. Keep scrolling to meet the best fashion bloggers of every age group!
“There are so many trend pieces, online articles, news snippets, and magazine blurbs about what the next ‘it’ things are or what things you ‘should never be seen in again.’ All that is propaganda. True personal style is that which looks great to the outside world but makes the wearer feel even greater inside. If you are confident in your style, it will project beauty no matter what you’re wearing.” —Stephen V Hernandez, a personal stylist based out of NYC  
You might accurately describe Alyson Walsh as the Alexa Chung of her generation: She prefers wearing a good pair of jeans and a T-shirt over anything too fussy. She writes that she started her blog, That's Not My Age, with one mission: "I've always strongly believed that you don't have to have youth to have style, and I wanted to share ideas and celebrate inspirational women (and men) of all ages."
How to actually do it: "Figure out your go-to, foolproof looks," says designer Nanette Lepore, then seek out variations on that theme. Stumped? Picture the outfits that you feel most comfortable in. Or ask people close to you what you look best in. Once you've zeroed in on what works, find different takes. "I gravitate toward jackets, so I'll do a bomber style, then a silk version, or a denim jacket with leather sleeves," says Minkoff. "Whenever you feel the need to talk yourself into things, that's a red flag that you shouldn't buy them," says Minkoff. If you have doubts in the dressing room, it may help to take a photo of yourself in the item, suggests Aerin Lauder, the founder and creative director of the lifestyle brand Aerin. "It's much more accurate than looking in the mirror."
×