Things were balmier in Milan, when Missoni held its 65th anniversary show on a rooftop, though the wind did pick up enough to make it hard for musical guest star Michael Nyman to turn the pages of his sheet music. And in Paris, everyone got downright lucky: Hermès staged its show at the Hippodrome de Longchamp where the horse track was obscured by a giant runway-long mirror angled up to reflect the clouds drifting across a soft blue sky; Sonia Rykiel unveiled a collection at night in a pedestrian thoroughfare in the Sixth Arrondissement of Paris, a.k.a. the newly christened Allée Sonia Rykiel (the first street ever named after a designer in the city); and Marine Serre’s latest looks traversed an elevated walkway overlooking endless railroad tracks. There were more, but you get where we’re going. — V.F.
Instead focus on a name that is fun, unique, and memorable. Opt for a series of 2-4 words that are easy to remember, and not too tricky to spell. You could include your name, or a series of words that sound good together. Consider sneaking words such as fashion or style into the name—but don’t force it. One of our favorite examples of a quirky and memorable blog name is Cupcakes and Cashmere, a blog dedicated to all things food and fashion.
There are tons of style bloggers out there today—but just like anything fabulous, there’s definitely room for more. In fact, it probably won’t be long before having a blog is a prerequisite for getting a job in the fashion industry. After all, it’s a form of networking—a way to showcase your style, position yourself as an expert, and get known in the fashion world.

Fashion’s most unflattering women’s wear trend is far from a spot in our rearview mirrors. Skintight bike shorts pedaled their way onto scores of runways once again this season, having first emerged as a ’90s throwback reference at Off-White this time last year. At Fendi, in a look sported by Bella Hadid, they were long, navy and spandex, with shimmering streaks and a matching leather waist belt. At Roberto Cavalli, Paul Surridge presented a pair for after dark, in ochre with blue sequined embroidery. Over in Paris, the first look from the new creative director at Mugler, Casey Cadwallader, was an oversize, seamed black blazer and — you guessed it — matching biking shorts. And Jacquemus opted for an unforgiving knitted tangerine variation, to be worn with an oversize white shirt and the swagger of someone comfortable with having everything on show. Saddle up! — ELIZABETH PATON, European correspondent, Styles

1. Get a graphic designer’s help early on. Even if you purchase a wordpress theme and add your own logo, your web site can still look like crap. I’ve seen blurry logos and color-schemes that make me want to gouge my eyes out…from bloggers who think their site looks great. The more professional-looking your site, the more trust your readers will have in you.
I was asked to share my "big big world" at the Sydney Opera House and the Melbourne Writers Festival and mostly talked about fangirling, the anxiety of influence, and being happy instead of putting pressure on yourself to be some tortured artist. I love Neil Gaiman's "make good art" speech, but I wanted to talk about what happens when you can't make good art, and about how fulfilling it can be to appreciate other people's art. If you prefer to watch the FIRST-EVER DELIVERY of this thing, the Sydney one is here, but I've embedded the slightly-updated Melbourne one above.
If you already love and wear a particular brand, don’t just ask to be added to the list—also let the agency know why your blog would be an excellent fit and send links of posts where you’ve worn the brand before. Also try directly reaching out to emerging brands that may not be large enough to have their own agency—they’re likely excited to grow their own following and eager to work with you.
It’s official: I’m wearing things that are a decade old. I’ve had both this ivory coat and camel sweater for a whopping 10 years. (Whoa!) I was inspired to wear them together by the colors on this plaid scarf, which I have quite the affinity for - check out 6 ways I’ve worn it, below. Lots of old things on the blog today but a new way to wear them together!
Great Post, I chose to focus on the crowdfunding niche. It was a 2 billion dollar industry last year and is projected to be a 5 billion dollar industry this year. I recommend using Fiverr to use graphic designers for first time bloggers. I did use the logo designed for five dollars at the top of my site (bottom now) but stopped using it because it didn’t look good on mobile.
Other commercially successful independent fashion blogs include Budget Fashionista, which reportedly brings in $600,000 a year in revenue[23] and The Bag Snob, which "generates a six-figure income, mainly from advertising". By 2008 SheFinds.com was generating $400,000 in revenue per year.[24] Personal style bloggers like Aimee Song from SongofStyle.com has told WWD that she gets paid anywhere from a couple thousand to 50,000 dollars for hosting an event or Instagramming a brand.[25]
The spring collections always encourage designers to wax bohemian — a flower here, a fringe there. But what seemed different this season was where, and how frequently, these ideas appeared. Chloé and Paco Rabanne in Paris were leaders of the pack, each constructing garments from layers of contrasting floral prints that evoked exotic gardens. Patchwork and fringe were reimagined too, as was the case at Altuzarra, where seashell-embellished net sheaths topped knit dresses. Finally, at Etro, flowing paisley dresses were worn with vibrantly patterned wool blankets. — M.J.G.

About - Already Pretty is a daily blog that provides tips and advice for regular women on regular budgets who want to look and feel fabulous every single day. Lots of helpful photos illustrate features on making your wardrobe work for you. Already Pretty also touches on accepting your own beauty, highlighting your best features, and other ways to feel more comfortable in your own bod.
“Don’t be intimidated by fashion! Fashion is supposed to be fun and happy, not to cause stress. The key to finding personal style is to list—yes, write them down—items that make you feel comfortable and confident and the things that make you feel uncomfortable or just not yourself. The latter group? Don’t wear them! Not matter how trendy they are.” —Mr. Hernandez
One of the new season's most feminine trends came by way of bows. Losing its prissy connotations, they came in vibrant red at Valentino, and in sorbet shades at Emilia Wickstead and Erdem. They were particularly pervasive at London Fashion Week, where they adorned the backs of dresses at Wickstead, Preen and Delpozo. If following suit feels too saccharine, then tailor a polished ponytail with a bow instead like on the Emilia Wickstead catwalk, a look that's has already inspired Poppy Delevingne.
“Don’t go out and purchase all the latest trends if they are not flattering or don’t go with your personal style. Your style is about taking what is out there and combining it in unique ways that express who you are. It is not about being a clone and looking like everyone else. So don’t take the rules too seriously.” —Diane Pollack, a personal style curator and wardrobe consultant in NYC   Learn some secrets you never knew about your own clothes.
The New York-based Eadie, 29, is best known for her accessible, yet educated, approach to fashion. Based in San Francisco when she launched the blog, Eadie has worked as a merchandiser for brands like Gap and Tory Burch, which means she has a professional edge when it comes to outfit posts. And brands like love working with her because she has a reputation for converting readers into shoppers. 
Stock Up On Basics: Known your essentials and stock up. These include white and black blouses, a little black dress, high heels, red lipstick, diamond studs, blue jeans and anything else that has a central role in your style. Remember, these looks are timeless so investing in certain items that are more expensive but higher in quality may be wiser because they will last longer.
Other commercially successful independent fashion blogs include Budget Fashionista, which reportedly brings in $600,000 a year in revenue[23] and The Bag Snob, which "generates a six-figure income, mainly from advertising". By 2008 SheFinds.com was generating $400,000 in revenue per year.[24] Personal style bloggers like Aimee Song from SongofStyle.com has told WWD that she gets paid anywhere from a couple thousand to 50,000 dollars for hosting an event or Instagramming a brand.[25]
The Daileigh’s Ashleigh Hutchinson offers articles and courses to help her readers build the perfect closet. She aims to help women aged 20-70 to create a style they love. Ashleigh includes quite a few fashion eBooks on her site, as well as blog posts and beautiful fashion photography. She even holds online webinars to help people improve their fashion sense.

There aren’t many redeeming factors about living through really cold weather fashion wise, but it is the only time during the year that you can wear fur (or faux fur, of course). So just have fun with it! You can wear fur with just about anything to give your outfit an instant upgrade. Unvest in a statement fur topper, throw on a fur vest or stole over your winter coat, or find cool fur accent pieces like fur collars or even fur mittens to liven up your winter outfits.
“Remember how in ‘The Devil Wears Prada’ the editor always wore a single white Hermes scarf as her signature piece? What’s your version of this? No matter how traditional or fashion forward you like to be, have a think about what pieces you really gravitate to and make it your signature style. And it doesn’t have to be a scarf. Consider bright colored shoes, men’s style watches, or classic shirts.” —Ms. Narain 

The Daileigh’s Ashleigh Hutchinson offers articles and courses to help her readers build the perfect closet. She aims to help women aged 20-70 to create a style they love. Ashleigh includes quite a few fashion eBooks on her site, as well as blog posts and beautiful fashion photography. She even holds online webinars to help people improve their fashion sense.
The versions about the origin of casual style are diverse, too. According to one, it originated in a small Scottish town Aberdeen, particularly in a football club, where everyone wore his/her name on the clothes. The fans of football and the founders of this club wanted to be different from the others and they created a unique football style, characterized by the pieces of certain brands. Further, the football fans realized that the brands were not at all important. And they started concentrating on the comfort and the harmony of the pieces that were combined and the casual style was born. According to another version, the native Scandinavian people of the countryside used this style for their combinations.
Don't Buy Trends That Don't Suit Your Body Type: There are trends that we say 'I could never wear that' because it's too bold or daring, but there are also trends that we see and instantly know that they aren't for our body type. No matter what people say about being able to pull anything off if you have confidence, if you see something and don't think it will work for you, it probably won't.

About Blog I'm Brittany Xavier and I began my personal style blog. My style is versatile, casual, comfortable and a bit edgy. My blog first started out as only fashion but over the last three years so much of it really includes the lifestyle aspect of my everyday life. A blog to highlight my affordable finds as well as brands I find worth the splurge, those investment pieces I'll wear again and again.
Kathleen’s blog was created out of the realization that post-grad life wasn’t as fabulous as Carrie Bradshaw had led her to believe (even as adults, we’re still trying to solve the puzzle of how Carrie could afford a closet-full of Manolos on a writer’s salary). But looking at her inspiring outfits and picture-perfect lifestyle, you might have to disagree that it is extremely fabulous (except she pulls it all off with affordable pieces and doable outfit ideas).
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