(a) Adolescence. Not for all the sweaty, horrible stuff mentioned in #4, but for the positive feelings and experiences which are only accentuated by the fact that your developing brain is taking them in for the first time. And even the sweaty, horrible stuff can be kind of great to revel in. Or, in the words of John Hughes, "At that age, it often feels just as good to feel bad as it does to feel good."
"...It's hard to stay mad when there's so much beauty in the world. Sometimes I feel like I'm seeing it all at once, and it's too much, my heart fills up like a balloon that's about to burst...and then I remember to relax, and stop trying to hold on to it, and then it flows through me like rain and I can't feel anything but gratitude for every single moment of my stupid little life."
“As a size 14 myself, I have loved seeing the emergence of plus-sized women in fashion who have completely shattered expectations and rules over the last few years (i.e. Gabi Fresh, Nicolette Mason, Tanesha Awasthi, Margie Plus to name a few). Their confidence shines through in every photograph, and they don’t listen to silly rules about what ‘curvy’ girls can and can’t wear. They just wear what they love.” —Alison Jimenez, stylist and blogger at NYC Recessionista
If you don’t pick out your clothing items carefully, you might end up fixing up your outfit every couple of minutes, unable to have any fun at all. Start by choosing shoes which are comfy, and coordinate your outfit with them. Make sure all items fit perfectly, so that nothing is slipping. Also, experts recommend carrying a sturdy chain bag, so your hands can remain free. 

4. Dress age-irrelevant. Who says you can't wear a black fisherman cap, short-sleeve or message T-shirts, funky sneakers, slouchy Army-green cargo pants and your hair in a tousle? A little infusion of urban, hippie or eclectic style makes every wardrobe, from classic to casual, a little cooler. Celebs like Meg Ryan, Lisa Bonet, Sharon Stone, Téa Leoni, Robin Wright, Halle Berry and Calista Flockhart all dress in age-irrelevant but supercool ways in their private lives.
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“Dress to show off your favorite areas and not to hide the ones you don’t love.  We all have trouble areas so choosing your outfit based on hiding behind your clothes is negative.  Instead, focus on the areas you love then dress them accordingly. Not only will you look great but it will help you appreciate the good things about your body instead of worrying about the ‘problems.’” —Ms. Brucker
Milliner Gigi Burris O’Hara is known for adding the most delicate details to her intricate hats, so she knows a thing or two about pulling together an outfit with panache. “Looking put together is very different than having it all together, it just takes a bit of mindfulness,” Burris O’Hara pointed out. “Make sure your shoes are shined and put on a hat—immediately you’ll look done.”
Fashion’s most unflattering women’s wear trend is far from a spot in our rearview mirrors. Skintight bike shorts pedaled their way onto scores of runways once again this season, having first emerged as a ’90s throwback reference at Off-White this time last year. At Fendi, in a look sported by Bella Hadid, they were long, navy and spandex, with shimmering streaks and a matching leather waist belt. At Roberto Cavalli, Paul Surridge presented a pair for after dark, in ochre with blue sequined embroidery. Over in Paris, the first look from the new creative director at Mugler, Casey Cadwallader, was an oversize, seamed black blazer and — you guessed it — matching biking shorts. And Jacquemus opted for an unforgiving knitted tangerine variation, to be worn with an oversize white shirt and the swagger of someone comfortable with having everything on show. Saddle up! — ELIZABETH PATON, European correspondent, Styles
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