Instead focus on a name that is fun, unique, and memorable. Opt for a series of 2-4 words that are easy to remember, and not too tricky to spell. You could include your name, or a series of words that sound good together. Consider sneaking words such as fashion or style into the name—but don’t force it. One of our favorite examples of a quirky and memorable blog name is Cupcakes and Cashmere, a blog dedicated to all things food and fashion.
Great Post, I chose to focus on the crowdfunding niche. It was a 2 billion dollar industry last year and is projected to be a 5 billion dollar industry this year. I recommend using Fiverr to use graphic designers for first time bloggers. I did use the logo designed for five dollars at the top of my site (bottom now) but stopped using it because it didn’t look good on mobile.
Rookie Yearbook Two is out! It is the print edition of our best content from our second year as a website and I am crazy proud of it. This one was a real labor of love -- I flew to Montreal twice to work with Drawn & Quarterly in person, and what you see in these pages came from two suitcases full of my clothes, trinkets, jewelry, cut-outs, record covers, journals, et cetera times infinity. It is so hugely satisfying to have put our contributors' amazing work into a tangible form, exhaustively designed and obsessively detailed. There are also a bunch of extras you can't get on our site: letters to our readers from Judy Blume and Mindy Kaling, an interview with Mindy by Lena Dunham, pages from Grimes' sketchbook, and enough stickers to make you swoon. Here are two videos of tiny previews of my favorite spreads, and two reviews that made me feel like, cool, yes, we put this out into the world and other people feel the way we do. More important than what a buncha fancy GROWN-UPS think, though, is that our readers like it, so thank you to anyone who's come to any of the events on our book tour and shown the love. I'm rubber, you're glue, your enthusiasm bounces off me and sticks 2 u.
How to actually do it: "Figure out your go-to, foolproof looks," says designer Nanette Lepore, then seek out variations on that theme. Stumped? Picture the outfits that you feel most comfortable in. Or ask people close to you what you look best in. Once you've zeroed in on what works, find different takes. "I gravitate toward jackets, so I'll do a bomber style, then a silk version, or a denim jacket with leather sleeves," says Minkoff. "Whenever you feel the need to talk yourself into things, that's a red flag that you shouldn't buy them," says Minkoff. If you have doubts in the dressing room, it may help to take a photo of yourself in the item, suggests Aerin Lauder, the founder and creative director of the lifestyle brand Aerin. "It's much more accurate than looking in the mirror."
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