I also loved “copy your competition and then be better”; what sets each person/blog apart is the perspective they write from. We’re all unique like snowflakes (how precious) but the reality of it is, how are you showing that uniqueness? In order to be a successful blogger, you need to connect with your audience in a way they want to be connected with. Recycling ideas and putting your unique voice and creativity on them is how you’ll connect in a different way than others have. I just bought a book, “Steal like an artist” (by Austin Kleon) that talks about this exact thing!
The blogosphere has indeed opened up many doors for the fashion industry, one of which is allowing the ordinary people to partake in the 'elite' fashion world and discuss their likes and dislikes on the way fashion is presented in the media.[6] In 2008, the Pulitzer Prize winning fashion writer and former blogger Robin Givhan, claimed that fashion blogs had democratized the fashion industry. Givhan had also written in Harpers Bazaar that 'The rise of the fashion blogger has evolved [fashion] from an aristocratic business dominated by omnipotent designers into a democratic one in which everyone has access to stylistic clothes...the average people, too often estranged from fashion, is not taking ownership of it'.[7] A similar statement was said by Constance White, the style director for E-bay and former fashion journalist, saying that the impact of the fashion blogosphere has allowed the whole population to take ownership of the fashion world, including people of all different races, genders, and social standings.[8] The Daily Mail writer Karen Kay suggested once in an interview that blogs allow anyone to both critique and praise designers, regardless of the often ‘needed’ professional opinion, with the help fashion blogs, the consumers are helping to set the trends.[9]
Why: Since stumbling across this gorgeous blog, our lives have been so much more colourful. Jess goes beyond the standard #OOTD posts and her site’s a sartorial treasure trove full of styling advice, galleries and even some tips for budding bloggers if you’re thinking of making this list some day. Her masterfully saturated and unique photography is what sets her apart from the rest of the pack and we still can’t stop thinking about her guide to wearing colour this spring…
As you grow your blog and build up a following you will have the opportunity to network with other fashion bloggers.  This not only let’s you meet new people with similar interests, but it also opens the door for publicity.  If you have a great blog and put in some time into networking with other fashion bloggers you can grow your blog readership and potentially become a fashion blogging celebrity!

Ultra Violet may be the Pantone Colour of the Year for 2018, but street style stars preferred a softer take on the trend this season. Rocking a range of shades from the lavender family, fashionistas proved that light purple is seriously stylish. Whether worn in the form of boots, dresses, coats or even head-to-toe ensembles, the flattering and feminine colour added a lovely touch to looks. Try it for yourself if you’re after something subtle yet exciting.
What this style absolutely excludes is anything that’s official, taken from business looks or other subcultures. All the rest is welcome. Casual style is suitable for every woman with any type of figure, which is also very important. An example of this style can be an interesting top, some minimalistic shorts, a creative handbag, and a light scarf.
The Daileigh’s Ashleigh Hutchinson offers articles and courses to help her readers build the perfect closet. She aims to help women aged 20-70 to create a style they love. Ashleigh includes quite a few fashion eBooks on her site, as well as blog posts and beautiful fashion photography. She even holds online webinars to help people improve their fashion sense.
4. Dress age-irrelevant. Who says you can't wear a black fisherman cap, short-sleeve or message T-shirts, funky sneakers, slouchy Army-green cargo pants and your hair in a tousle? A little infusion of urban, hippie or eclectic style makes every wardrobe, from classic to casual, a little cooler. Celebs like Meg Ryan, Lisa Bonet, Sharon Stone, Téa Leoni, Robin Wright, Halle Berry and Calista Flockhart all dress in age-irrelevant but supercool ways in their private lives.

“Start small,” is Marilyn’s advice for adding a pop of color to your everyday looks. She suggests adding a neck scarf or a colorful pair of shoes to start and then building your way up to a totally color-filled wardrobe. She also thinks red is a great starting point. “Red is really so timeless; it’s bright and bold and goes with everything. It’s such a strong and empowering color,” she noted.
This style is practically impossible to imagine without our fave denim pieces. The reason is that denim is practical and comfortable. For instance, you can put on skinny jeans with a short tunic or a light blouse with romantic flare design, of course, not forgetting about the fact that this style doesn’t absolutely bear glamorous details like beads, glitter, or rhinestones.
"Never underestimate the power of one or two accessories on a simple outfit. For example, a cute tee with a high-waisted skirt (of moderate length) and tights with your favorite boots, pretty cute. But add a watch and a conversation-starter necklace and it instantly makes you look more polished and put together. That's my staple outfit for work." —Submitted by Rachel Davis (via Facebook)

“Sadly, if I’ve learned one thing as the owner of a PR firm in LA, the reality is that people do judge a book by its cover. If you are slovenly or unkempt, most likely you will not be taken as seriously as one who is put together.” —Michelle Czernin von Chudenitz Morzin, founder and CEO of Popular Press Media Group    Don’t make these fashion mistakes that make you look messy.
Purse Essentials: A purse isn't just a fashion statement. It's main purpose is functional. You carry it around wherever you go so it needs to contain some essentials: your wallet, a pen, pain killers, hand sanitizer, tissues, make-up essentials (we personally won't leave the house without lip stick and/or lip balm), hand cream, gum or breath mints, tampons or maxi pads (no one wants to be caught off guard during that time of the month), and for those of you who spend lengthy bouts talking, texting or gaming, bring your phone charger along.

I don't actually think these events really happened to me, but they'll still come to mind when I think back on a time when a secondhand event seemed to hold some kind of truth that reality did not. Example: I felt all weird and drifty at the beginning of last summer, and when I try and revisit that place, I don't literally imagine the view from behind a car windshield and how everything must look to the narrator in Yo La Tengo's "Today Is the Day," but I sure remember the exact sadness that it captured.
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