“You don’t have to spend an arm and a leg to look fantastic, however, we do tend to feel and act a little different when we wear things that are expensive. We treat those things differently too; with more care. We tell ourselves that they are special and that we are special when we wear them. But really it’s the mental story we assign to those items that make them special. Expensive things might trigger those feelings more easily but you can shine just as bright every day with ordinary things, just by acting as you would if they were expensive.” —Jennifer Lowe, stylist and designer for Water Vixen Swim    Learn some more ways you can use clothing to influence your mood.

Accidents happen, you can’t argue with that. No matter how careful you are, something will get spilled when you least expected it. So, have a spare clothing item nearby at all times possible. Start by taking something to your office, like perhaps a white button-down shirt, which is a classic, and it will probably be able to fit in your outfit. Believe it or not, most woman don’t have the right white shirt – it’s the same story like the one with bras, so look for a second opinion when purchasing one.


Your blog should be a reflection of you. It is very important that you blog about something that you really love, and something that you understand well. You have to make an impact and show something unique because there are millions of other fashion blogs that are alike. If you love clothes, write about it and take pictures. If you are only into shoes, focus on what you love (and don’t love) about the footwear industry. But here are a few topics that might help you get to your passion:
InStyle is part of the Meredith Beauty Group. © Copyright 2018 Meredith Corporation. All Rights Reserved. InStyle may receive compensation for some links to products and services on this website. Offers may be subject to change without notice. Privacy Policy | Terms of Service | Ad Choices | Your California Privacy Rights | EU Data Subject Requests
"Every woman really only needs 20 core items in her closet," advises Nazarudin. "A black pair of pants, a blue blazer, a cashmere V-neck sweater in a jewel tone, and so on." Outside of these 20, you can experiment with more inexpensive items — if you don't like them, it's not nearly as bad as if you dropped $300 on a trendy piece you only wore once. If you need tips on how to maximize your basics, check out Good Housekeeping Style Director Lori Bergamotto's weeklong experiment in wearing the same thing every day.

Fashion is a multibillion-dollar industry that has considerable impact on the way ordinary people dress and present themselves and relies heavily on media and advertising to communicate the producer's preferences and goals and influence public perception through various types of promotion; at the same time, fashion can be influenced by social change and counter-trends outside the producer, retailer or advertiser's control. As fashion is driven by trends within and without the fashion industry, fashion blogs and other "new media" outside the control of traditional establishment represent a disruptive innovation to the social dynamics of mass media and fashion consumption in modern consumer society. It is likely that the blogosphere will have a considerable long-term influence on the industry, as the number of fashion based blogs continue to grow, with increasing numbers of consumers able to create and modify the media that they consume, and traditional producers and advertisers adapting their practices to avoid dilution of their own influence.
Women’s fashion week, men’s fashion week — for a few shows, it was everybody’s fashion week, an acknowledgment that the orthodoxies surrounding gender are, at least in certain corners of the world, eroding as we speak. At Maison Margiela, there were bows on boys and suits on girls, and videos of models proclaiming that breaking rules was “My Mutiny.” (It turned out that Mutiny is the name of Margiela’s new fragrance, and that social movements are as co-optable for profit as anything else. Buyer beware.) But there was a genuine sense of play at upstart shows like Luar and Vaquera in New York and the newly rebranded Courrèges in Paris, a refreshing agnosticism about who could (and would) wear what. Who wears the pants? We does! — M.S.
A content management system (CMS) is both the skeleton and shell for your blog. A CMS controls how your blog looks and what it does. CMSs usually spare you the trouble of learning complicated programming or design. Since you’re looking for a blogging platform that will also allow you to add and manage the content of your blog, your choice of CMS boils down to a few options such as WordPress, Joomla and Drupal.
Speaking of rules, we should mentioned those regarding showing skin. It’s pretty simple – show one body part at a time. So if you’re showing your cleavage, pay attention you’re not combining that with miniskirts, and the other way around. Looking and feeling attractive shouldn’t be based on how naked you are. A little bit of mystery is always a nice touch.
II. My understanding of death deepens. I think I'd always assumed I'd at least get to watch my funeral go down and have a few suspicions confirmed concerning who would write awkward "Happy Birthday! Miss you :(" messages on my Facebook wall long after I'd passed. I thought I'd get to still see how this whole "world" thing turns out: Do we all explode? Do things start to suck less first? Does everyone get sick of technology and start to live like the Amish, inspired by that one episode of Arthur? DO PEOPLE STILL WATCH ARTHUR?

Dylan Suarez of Color Me Nana stresses the importance of your reader-base. “Keep a conversation going with other bloggers out there,” she suggests. “Click on the comments on the blogs you like and research new people in the community you don’t know,” adding, “If you like the content, leave a comment! Or send an email. It’s all a domino effect. Blogging is very much built on community and conversation, so that has to be the main focus.”
Why: Of Turkish/Iranian Jewish descent, Medine kicked off her career with a blog called Boogers + Bagels. Her ironic fashion-addict asides soon had her readers rolling in the aisles, and she decided to focus on the topic full-time after a joky conversation while out shopping with a friend about how ‘man-repelling’ all the fashion-forward outfits they loved were. It’s now a male-scaring empire, providing in-depth intel: ‘The difference between Mom Jeans and Dad Jeans’, the fabulous ‘Manstagram’ – all the best fash items du jour – and fun features and style news aplenty.
Can we all stop fiddling with our smartphone filters and beautification apps for a minute? It’s time for a healthy heaping of irreverence, gratitude and common sense. First off, thank you to Spanx for creating shapewear arm tights that compress upper-arm dangle (but we've got it covered); New York Fashion Week for giving models over age 50 a record 10 runway appearances out of 2,601 (but you can do better); and France for passing a law stating all altered advertising photos must carry a "retouched" warning (but we know a fake when we see it — from a phony Chanel bag to a filler-enhanced face). Instead, here are 10 age-positive ways to start the holiday season.
This style is practically impossible to imagine without our fave denim pieces. The reason is that denim is practical and comfortable. For instance, you can put on skinny jeans with a short tunic or a light blouse with romantic flare design, of course, not forgetting about the fact that this style doesn’t absolutely bear glamorous details like beads, glitter, or rhinestones.
How to actually do it: "Figure out your go-to, foolproof looks," says designer Nanette Lepore, then seek out variations on that theme. Stumped? Picture the outfits that you feel most comfortable in. Or ask people close to you what you look best in. Once you've zeroed in on what works, find different takes. "I gravitate toward jackets, so I'll do a bomber style, then a silk version, or a denim jacket with leather sleeves," says Minkoff. "Whenever you feel the need to talk yourself into things, that's a red flag that you shouldn't buy them," says Minkoff. If you have doubts in the dressing room, it may help to take a photo of yourself in the item, suggests Aerin Lauder, the founder and creative director of the lifestyle brand Aerin. "It's much more accurate than looking in the mirror."
×