“Dress to show off your favorite areas and not to hide the ones you don’t love.  We all have trouble areas so choosing your outfit based on hiding behind your clothes is negative.  Instead, focus on the areas you love then dress them accordingly. Not only will you look great but it will help you appreciate the good things about your body instead of worrying about the ‘problems.’” —Ms. Brucker

As we get ready to usher in a new year, it's also time to usher in a new set of trends. According to the runways, the street style scene, and the best dressed A-listers, these are the emerging fashion trends to watch in 2018. Whether your resolution is to take more style risks or hone in on your wardrobe, these are the looks to weave into your wardrobe. Plus, the trends it's time to retire (for now).
Nothing comes back the same way, and the jumpsuit of 2017 is not necessarily the same as a version from the '70s. Check out the difference in Raquel Welch's and Tilda Swinton's jumpsuits. There are subtle design tweaks that make any revival slightly different from the original. Does that piece from your "archive" really work now? Ask a trusted friend for a second opinion.
Los Angeles-based wardrobe stylist and YouTube vlogger Chriselle Lim is the fashionable force behind "The Chriselle Factor," a fashion blog that provides insight into her personal fashion style. Chriselle's site covers fashion, beauty, and lifestyle topics, ranging from travel to fitness and home decor. In the Fashion section of her blog, Chriselle shares photos of the drool-worthy outfits she wears to her jaunts to Fashion Week in Paris and New York City, among other stylish points of travel. Informed by a fashion sense that's super-feminine and completely trend-obsessed, this blog is a major destination for anyone looking for up-to-the-moment fashion inspiration. More »

Accessorizing is what actually gives an outfit a personal touch. The way you accessorize is an important part of your style. Most of garments in your color are probably (and should be) in neutral colors, so you can combine them when you find it suitable. So, when you’re purchasing accessories, you should be free to get them in wild colors. Also, don’t be afraid to clash together different materials, like edgy chains with pears and feathers, perhaps. An interesting addition to accessorizing somehow everyone tends to forget are buttons – try switching a set from your garment with the one you choose. It doesn’t require any special sewing skills, and it fits any kind of budget. You should know that accessorizing rounds out an outfit, so try to find time to put on a couple of items.
In a study conducted through the Biz360 Community, it was found that over 53% of the New York City Fashion Week converge had come from online articles and fashion blogs. While a vast portion of what was written in these blogs came from various mainstream fashion resource magazine and newspaper articles, such as Coutorture and New York Magazine, these fashion blogs provided a larger viewing and reading audience for the fashion week.[13]
Great winter style really boils down to a great pair of boots. Got a great pair of over-the-knee boots? Show them off pairing them with a short dress. Have killer ankle boots you want to make sure the world gets to see? Pair them with cuffed jeans or a dress. And if it’s snowing and you are forced to wear less than fashionable snow boots? Use them as a jumping off point to put together a great new inventive outfit, rather than just throwing them on with just anything.
Clean Out Your Closet: Those items that just seem to hang in our closet season after season -- or even year after year -- that we always say we'll wear, but don't, need to get tossed at some point. Donate them or do a clothing swap! You'll be making room for new clothes, which is always good. Better yet, incorporate the 'one in, one out' philosophy into your closet -- when something new comes home, something old gets permanently loaned to a friend.

There's a certain kind of woman who appears effortlessly styled wherever she goes. We've come to know this woman as the fashion girl — the type who just gets outfit proportions, layering tricks, and how to pull off the trend of the moment. Sure, her styling prowess can be downright irritating — how does she always make it seem so easy? — but it can also be incredibly enlightening.
The New York-based Eadie, 29, is best known for her accessible, yet educated, approach to fashion. Based in San Francisco when she launched the blog, Eadie has worked as a merchandiser for brands like Gap and Tory Burch, which means she has a professional edge when it comes to outfit posts. And brands like love working with her because she has a reputation for converting readers into shoppers. 

When In Doubt, Overdress: There's nothing worse than showing up an event underdressed. Maybe the invite didn't specify or involved the word casual — but everyone else dressed up not so casually. If you don't know what the dress code is, overdress. There's no harm in looking too pulled together, but you'll feel uncomfortable if you think you look out of place.
You hit up your friends for help. For example, when I did a site redesign a few year ago, I asked for help with the overall color and feel. I told them I’d do the work, I just needed their opinion. My friend helped me perfect the site’s color scheme and the feel of the layout. Also told me stuff like “that image needs to be sharper…don’t resize, save in the right format, etc.”
Blogger Krystal Bick is the woman behind "This Time Tomorrow," a fashion blog that covers style, travel, art, dating, and other topics related to living in New York City. A transplanted West Coaster, Krystal's fashion vibe is a true blend of East and West coast American style (or you could say, girlfriend meets boyfriend style). Her looks tend to gravitate toward classic, tailored pieces inspired by menswear, but often with feminine and quirky accents thrown in, such as a pair of cropped patterned trousers, a silky blouse, high heel pumps, and an over-sized men's watch. More »
For the 2016 Pirelli Calendar, Annie Leibovitz chose to photograph women whose achievements demonstrate a different kind of beauty from what the calendar has traditionally showcased. I'm still shocked to be included among so many people who've long influenced not just my work, but how I see the world, and try to see myself. Annie photographed me one year earlier in the pink velvet dress I'd originally bought for prom, in my parents' backyard. At that time, it was still my backyard, too, and had functioned since I was a little kid as a personal photo studio, study, and consistent reminder that I was bigger than I had been the year before, and the year before that, and that this would only keep happening. (I'm still v short, but: relatively speaking.) It was where I learned that as your childhood shrinks around you, so will your sense of wonder, unless you choose to pay close attention to what surrounds you at new heights. When Annie shot me for Pirelli, we were just a few blocks from my new home in NYC. A lot happens in that first year, and not knowing the geography of the city makes every encounter feel totally isolated from the rest of the world, like a castle on a cloud. At the time of this shoot, I was parsing what in this year had seemed significant just because it was new, and then what was enriching. I was exhausted by the sheen, and desperate to develop a kind of discernment which would make me so healthy, so OK with myself, that genuine wonder would return--gravitation towards stuff that isn't just shiny, but illuminates the same sorts of truths I'd learned as a fan of Patti, Yoko, and other women who happen to be in this calendar, too. I decided to cut my hair on the shoot, rid myself of any excess. Annie made me feel completely comfortable, like I was the same person as the year before, but indeed older. Again, still very physically short. My foot is peeking out of that shoe. I urge you to look at the other portraits, all so stunning, bold & nearly impossible to turn away from. They are strongest as a group, but I wanted to share what mine means to me and thank you for following what I do in such a way that has allowed for this to happen.

Whether you're tall or curvy, petite, boyish or blessed with curves — dressing in a way that flatters your specific body will always make you feel more confident and beautiful. Taller women can get away with longer hemlines, while more petite women will want to avoid being swallowed up by what they wear. Hourglass figures should embrace figure-hugging dresses and so on.

"Well, really, our memories are all we have, and even those we think of as "real" are made up. Art can condense experience into something greater than reality, and it can also give us permission to do or think certain things that otherwise we’ve avoided or felt ashamed of. The imagination is where reality lives; it’s the instant lie of backwash from the prow of that boat that we think of as cutting the present moment, everything following it becoming less and less "factual" but no less real than what we think of as having actually occurred."

If someone offers you clothing, that’s great! But don’t be afraid to ask for payment anytime a brand wants a sponsored or promoted piece—promotional pieces should be treated like advertisements, even if they’re integrated into your everyday posts. Just like magazines earn money from their advertisers to stay in business, your blog will eventually have to earn money through sponsorships or promotions if it’s going to stay afloat.
The segment of bloggers in their 30s, 40s, 50s, and beyond may be small, but it's mighty. We aim to enlighten you, dear reader, about the ladies of all ages who are killing the fashion-blogging game at the moment—from the 25-year-old whippersnappers to the 65-year-olds who've been at it for a good while longer. Prepare to be majorly inspired by all the women showing off their unique (and frankly, fun) looks. Keep scrolling to meet the best fashion bloggers of every age group!

Tie-dye emerged as a fashion influencer favourite for summer 2018, and it's a look that was compounded on the catwalk. No longer solely the preserve of art teachers and ageing hippies, tie-dye has had a modern update, At Dior, the brand employed its meticulous craftsmanship to the process to create kaleidoscope versions, sometimes layering tie-dye over florals. Miuccia Prada went for a flouro approach, used to reflect a liberated woman. Stella McCartney's version came in blue and white boilersuits, T-shirts and combat trousers.


“One of the most important things that people need to realize is that just because they buy something in their ‘size,’ doesn’t mean that it’s going to fit them. People get very invested in being a certain size but this is a huge mistake as different designers cut for different body types and also, many companies ‘play with size’ in order to flatter customers. Buy what fits, regardless of the number on the tag.” —Michael O’Connor, personal stylist

About - I started this blog because I love clothes – thats obvious, right? I think that clothes and fashion are the best way to express yourself. An outfit says a lot more about a person than you’d think. I love sharing my daily outfits & makeup with all of you! I love to shop and I may or may not have a shopping problem (yikes!) but I figured I could at least turn that into something positive – by sharing my favorite fashion items with you!
“‘Fashion’ is the tangible clothes, the ones you see in stores, in magazines, and on celebrities. Style, however, is intangible. Style is how you take the fashion and interpret it into an outfit or look that makes you feel like you. It’s not all about the fashion or trends but rather accepting yourself, working with what flatters your figure, finding what tickles your fancy and wearing wearing what makes you confident.” —Laurie Brucker, certified image consultant, personal stylist and speaker
Personal style bloggers sometimes get a bad rap -- caricatured as pretty, brainless girls who dress up for their camera-wielding boyfriends and post their results to a WordPress blog. But over the past decade, these independent publishers have become a real force in the fashion industry -- not just snapping up front row seats at fashion shows, but landing major campaigns and collaborations with brands, becoming regular guests on TV shows like "Today" and "America's Next Top Model," and turning their blogs into multimillion-dollar businesses. Some have become household names.

You cannot move forward if you choose to look backward. My Uncle Joe, who was an Ojibwa, married to my cousin, often said as long as the chiefs can keep my people hostage on reserves they'll never amount to anything. Joe was a wise man, wiser than all the politicians and and self serving chiefs, because one day the younger generation will leave the reserves and become full participants in society, hopefully enjoying equal benefits as well as equal responsibility.
Fashion has always loved a showman. This season, however, the “experiential show” — in which design houses collaborate with artists, musicians, dancers or directors to present blockbuster catwalk spectacles — was more popular than ever before. Inspired by dance and movement, Maria Grazia Chiuri’s sixth ready-to-wear collection for Dior was unveiled in Paris by models who wove their way around eight twirling dancers on a 164-meter-square stage, part of a dazzling performance choreographed by Sharon Eyal. At Gucci, Alessandro Michele had Jane Birkin serenade the crowd midway through the show with a rendition of “Baby Alone in Babylone” at the Théâtre Le Palace. And in Milan, Giorgio Armani asked the ’90s British heartthrob Robbie Williams to croon his greatest hits to an audience of thousands at the Emporio Armani show, held in a giant hangar at Linate airport. — E.P.
Every year when summer melts into fall, we admittedly get pretty excited to revamp our wardrobe. Don’t get us wrong, we love the easy, breezy fashion that comes with warm weather—but the cool, crisp autumn air just gives us so many options. However, when fall turns into winter and multiple layers become mandatory as opposed to an option, we start to run out of cute cold weather outfits real quick.

Camille Charriere is an enviably chic Parisian expat now based in London, where she photographs her daily outfit to inspire her many fans. Camille's style is definitely informed by a French fashion sensibility, and she has a genius flair for mixing structured basics (such as a tweed blazer or white t-shirt) with more glamorous separates (say, a satin midi-length skirt). You can use the "Store" link on her site to shop Camille's actual looks via Instagram, so you can recreate her effortlessly stylish outfits. More »


Expect to hear this term bandied around a lot next summer. If you like fashion and function to come balanced, then this is a good trend go-to. Denim boiler suits, combat trousers (a style that has been out of fashion long enough to make a return), oversized anoraks and utilitarian jackets prevailed on catwalks including Fendi, Dries Van Noten, Isabal Marant, Balmain, Givenchy and Hermès. Regarding the combat trousers, don't panic - these aren't military inspired, and instead loose-cut with pockets that aren't bulky.
If a dream is not considered as valid as "real," conscious memory, then I'll still regard it in some corner of the mind as a tiny piece of my history and identity. In Chris Ware's Building Stories, one character is able to partially reconcile her life's regret of neglecting to pursue a creative career because she dreams she had written the book she'd always hoped to. The fact that this book could exist even in her subconscious fantasy was enough for her. Just the notion of her own potential had her wake up in tears.
Fashion is a multibillion-dollar industry that has considerable impact on the way ordinary people dress and present themselves and relies heavily on media and advertising to communicate the producer's preferences and goals and influence public perception through various types of promotion; at the same time, fashion can be influenced by social change and counter-trends outside the producer, retailer or advertiser's control. As fashion is driven by trends within and without the fashion industry, fashion blogs and other "new media" outside the control of traditional establishment represent a disruptive innovation to the social dynamics of mass media and fashion consumption in modern consumer society. It is likely that the blogosphere will have a considerable long-term influence on the industry, as the number of fashion based blogs continue to grow, with increasing numbers of consumers able to create and modify the media that they consume, and traditional producers and advertisers adapting their practices to avoid dilution of their own influence.
About - I started this blog because I love clothes – thats obvious, right? I think that clothes and fashion are the best way to express yourself. An outfit says a lot more about a person than you’d think. I love sharing my daily outfits & makeup with all of you! I love to shop and I may or may not have a shopping problem (yikes!) but I figured I could at least turn that into something positive – by sharing my favorite fashion items with you!
Other commercially successful independent fashion blogs include Budget Fashionista, which reportedly brings in $600,000 a year in revenue[23] and The Bag Snob, which "generates a six-figure income, mainly from advertising". By 2008 SheFinds.com was generating $400,000 in revenue per year.[24] Personal style bloggers like Aimee Song from SongofStyle.com has told WWD that she gets paid anywhere from a couple thousand to 50,000 dollars for hosting an event or Instagramming a brand.[25]
And for an expert tip: Arabelle of Fashion Pirate attributes her inspiration to her friends, sharing, “it was their unintentional encouragement that got me to where I am today,” adding that, through the blogging process, she sees the most important change from start-to-finish as “the many friends [she’s] made from blogging, and the experiences [she’s] had with them.” So, bloggers, there's power in numbers.

Don't Pretend It Fits: We've all been there, standing in the dressing room and convincing ourselves that the button will magically stay closed when we get home (and then, of course, it doesn't). These are the times where we have to accept that our bodies have changed in one way or another, and buy clothes that fit. Because you know what happens to the clothes that don't fit (cue garbage bags being dropped off at Goodwill here).
I have been thinking a lot lately about what validates an emotion/event/observation, makes me feel like it really happened and I really lived it, and this seems like the right occasion to word-vomit these ideas. (Plus, I miss having time to keep this thing going, and I do feel an obligation to people who have read my blog for a long time that is not unlike the unspoken understanding you have with your first best friend, the one who watched you like stupid bands and stupid people and embarrass yourself and cry a lot, whose insight into whatever you do from now on is shaped by a unique knowledge of all the ties which bind New You to Old You, and who refrains from bringing up in front of new acquaintances that time you were on the 8th grade hip-hop team in the interest of letting you become more of yourself. In other words, we had a time, but there's so much time ahead, and it is, somehow, at the same time, quickly running out.)
A less strict style, which can also be used for business looks, combining the details of elegant and everyday styles is smart-casual. Giorgio Armani is believed to be the founder of this style, having shown the ways on how to add weightlessness and effortlessness to business looks. Other characteristic features of this style are the garments like comfy jumpers toping strict shirts with the unbuttoned top, etc. You can also cuff the sleeves and use a variety of accessories for complementing the looks including scarfs, earrings, or anything else, not being afraid of opting for bold color and design solutions. 
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