A less strict style, which can also be used for business looks, combining the details of elegant and everyday styles is smart-casual. Giorgio Armani is believed to be the founder of this style, having shown the ways on how to add weightlessness and effortlessness to business looks. Other characteristic features of this style are the garments like comfy jumpers toping strict shirts with the unbuttoned top, etc. You can also cuff the sleeves and use a variety of accessories for complementing the looks including scarfs, earrings, or anything else, not being afraid of opting for bold color and design solutions.

Much like suiting, the trench is not going anywhere anytime soon. The closet staple got an update for spring especially at Burberry, where newly installed creative director Riccardo Tisci presented many variations on the classic coat. A favorite (and a much-Instagrammed version!) was a beige trench coated in pearls and feathers. At Max Mara, Givenchy, and Valentino, the classic coat also made an appearance.
"Well, really, our memories are all we have, and even those we think of as "real" are made up. Art can condense experience into something greater than reality, and it can also give us permission to do or think certain things that otherwise we’ve avoided or felt ashamed of. The imagination is where reality lives; it’s the instant lie of backwash from the prow of that boat that we think of as cutting the present moment, everything following it becoming less and less "factual" but no less real than what we think of as having actually occurred."

When In Doubt, Overdress: There's nothing worse than showing up an event underdressed. Maybe the invite didn't specify or involved the word casual — but everyone else dressed up not so casually. If you don't know what the dress code is, overdress. There's no harm in looking too pulled together, but you'll feel uncomfortable if you think you look out of place.


When I remember eighth grade, I recall scenes my mind illustrated while reading Norwegian Wood, just as well as, and in some cases more vividly than, classmate interactions and walks to school. I spent a lot of freshman year analyzing my close, personal relationships with Rayanne Graff and Laura Palmer. I cried when I had watched The Virgin Suicides so many times that I could no longer remember how I'd first visualized the book. I still miss the characters I'd pictured before, and the school, too. Strangely enough, my first mental images of the Lisbons' house came flooding back to me when I set foot inside a neighbor's for a wake a couple years ago. When I walked outside, I saw that across the street was an old brown Cadillac surrounded by bushes and a sunset, mimicking two Corinne Day photos from the set of The Virgin Suicides almost exactly.
Mason, who writes a monthly column for Marie Claire and designed her own collection for Modcloth last fall, is one of the most in-demand bloggers working right now. The 29-year-old writer played a role in the promotion and social media around Target's new plus-size collection Ava & Viv and is also a budding TV personality, offering style advice on programs including "Today" and "Good Morning America." Mason is notable because she uses her blog as a platform to discuss bigger social issues, including race, sexuality and body image. 

How to actually do it: "Figure out your go-to, foolproof looks," says designer Nanette Lepore, then seek out variations on that theme. Stumped? Picture the outfits that you feel most comfortable in. Or ask people close to you what you look best in. Once you've zeroed in on what works, find different takes. "I gravitate toward jackets, so I'll do a bomber style, then a silk version, or a denim jacket with leather sleeves," says Minkoff. "Whenever you feel the need to talk yourself into things, that's a red flag that you shouldn't buy them," says Minkoff. If you have doubts in the dressing room, it may help to take a photo of yourself in the item, suggests Aerin Lauder, the founder and creative director of the lifestyle brand Aerin. "It's much more accurate than looking in the mirror."

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