How to actually do it: Strive to wear colors that enhance one another rather than "match" in the traditional sense. For an easy hack, says Minkoff, "look at a simple color wheel. The colors that are opposite each other on the wheel complement each other." (Think non-obvious but fetching combos, like orange and navy or purple and saffron.) Diversifying your accessories, in both color and texture, is another do. (A beloved trio from the vault of Betty Halbreich, a personal shopper at New York City's Bergdorf Goodman and the author of the style memoir I'll Drink to That: "A black dress, navy shoes, and a burgundy handbag.") And under no circumstances should you ever rock a suite of jewelry. Says Vazquez, " Anything that was sold together as a set looks really dated."
"Reflecting and archiving is not the same as dwelling in the past. It is not anti-living, but a part of life, even a crucial one. We do this to highlight one thing above others, so that a special moment can take up more space in our brains than an inconsequential one; so that, by plain math, our personal worlds contain more good things and fewer bad ones. Or more interesting things and fewer blah ones, since you have to record the bad, too."

Fashion’s most unflattering women’s wear trend is far from a spot in our rearview mirrors. Skintight bike shorts pedaled their way onto scores of runways once again this season, having first emerged as a ’90s throwback reference at Off-White this time last year. At Fendi, in a look sported by Bella Hadid, they were long, navy and spandex, with shimmering streaks and a matching leather waist belt. At Roberto Cavalli, Paul Surridge presented a pair for after dark, in ochre with blue sequined embroidery. Over in Paris, the first look from the new creative director at Mugler, Casey Cadwallader, was an oversize, seamed black blazer and — you guessed it — matching biking shorts. And Jacquemus opted for an unforgiving knitted tangerine variation, to be worn with an oversize white shirt and the swagger of someone comfortable with having everything on show. Saddle up! — ELIZABETH PATON, European correspondent, Styles
Sunday was the five-year anniversary of this here blob, which I've neglected in the past months in the interest of Rookie, high school, friends, sleep, and other things. Aside from that, I don't feel like I have much to say, or rather, I prefer now to say it in private. My most recent journal is my favorite thing I've ever made, and nobody will ever see it.
Once you’ve gained a solid following, you can start reaching out to clothing brands. This is the fun part! The first step is to create a list of PR or word of mouth marketing agencies that represent the brands you love and ask to be added to their media list. (Try Googling the brand name you’re after and the phrase “PR firm.” It’s likely a press release will pop up, giving you the contact information you need.) It’s also helpful to keep tabs on the industry by reading sites such as PRSA.org, FashionablyMarketing.Me, and PR Couture.
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If you don’t pick out your clothing items carefully, you might end up fixing up your outfit every couple of minutes, unable to have any fun at all. Start by choosing shoes which are comfy, and coordinate your outfit with them. Make sure all items fit perfectly, so that nothing is slipping. Also, experts recommend carrying a sturdy chain bag, so your hands can remain free.
The constant search for New! and More Original! and Never-Used-Before-for-a-Show venues can drive designers to some obscure places, and pretty risky choices. This season that meant a plethora of shows held en plein-air, unpredictable weather patterns be damned. In New York, rain poured down on Telfar’s show at the Blade helipad on 34th street (and a temporary tarp erected above guests’ heads blew away); it dripped off the umbrellas into attendees’ legs in the Marble Cemetery garden in the East Village at Rodarte, as well as onto the tulle dresses sprinkled among the roses; and it misted over the benches placed outside the original frame houses at the Weeksville Heritage Center, a historic Brooklyn site commemorating one of the first free African-American communities of the 19th century, where Kerby Jean-Raymond set his Pyer Moss show.
“Fashion shows are for transporting people,” Balenciaga designer Demna Gvasalia told Vogue this season, “otherwise there’s no point.” His show was one of the season’s most surreal transports. He compared working on a collection presentation to working on a movie, and in fact, it was Luc Besson’s studio on the outskirts of Paris where he held his show, in a digital tunnel that dripped, melted and swooped through a simulated reality. It was the work of the digital artist Jon Rafman, whom Gvasalia had met at Art Basel, and the effect was practically mind-melting, a digi-dystopia for an elegant but surreal collection.
4. Dress age-irrelevant. Who says you can't wear a black fisherman cap, short-sleeve or message T-shirts, funky sneakers, slouchy Army-green cargo pants and your hair in a tousle? A little infusion of urban, hippie or eclectic style makes every wardrobe, from classic to casual, a little cooler. Celebs like Meg Ryan, Lisa Bonet, Sharon Stone, Téa Leoni, Robin Wright, Halle Berry and Calista Flockhart all dress in age-irrelevant but supercool ways in their private lives.
Donate Clothes You'll Never Wear: Stop hoarding. If you haven't worn it recently, then you probably never will. To help decide if you should toss it or not, the experts at Apartment Therapy suggest you answer the following questions: Do you like cut, fabric and colour? Are you comfortable wearing it? Does it fit you now (no, not if you lose 3 inches off your waist in the next month)? Can any damages like stains or holes be fixed? Do you have more than one place to wear it? Can it be combined with other articles of clothing in your closet? When was the last time you wore it (if it's been over a year, nix it)? Source: Apartment Therapy
"Well, really, our memories are all we have, and even those we think of as "real" are made up. Art can condense experience into something greater than reality, and it can also give us permission to do or think certain things that otherwise we’ve avoided or felt ashamed of. The imagination is where reality lives; it’s the instant lie of backwash from the prow of that boat that we think of as cutting the present moment, everything following it becoming less and less "factual" but no less real than what we think of as having actually occurred."
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