"Never underestimate the power of one or two accessories on a simple outfit. For example, a cute tee with a high-waisted skirt (of moderate length) and tights with your favorite boots, pretty cute. But add a watch and a conversation-starter necklace and it instantly makes you look more polished and put together. That's my staple outfit for work." —Submitted by Rachel Davis (via Facebook)

Designers went big on all things animalia. For fall, we saw heavy coats and structured jackets in leopard spots and zebra stripes, but for spring, it is all in the unique animal-print details. We loved JW Anderson’s puff leopard-print sleeves and Richard Quinn’s excessive over-the-top take on spots, while Burberry’s mix of zebra on the top and spots on the bottom felt fun and fresh.
Fashion designers have often referenced art and artists through the years, and for Spring 2019, designers tapped into everything from futurism to Memphis design. At Marni, images were collaged and printed on draped dresses and coats. Most notably, at Louis Vuitton, Nicolas Ghesquière channeled early '90s geometric Memphis pattern on a number of his Spring runway looks.
“I don’t recommend buying a highly trendy item for a lot of money because in just a few months it’s almost guaranteed to be on the ‘OUT’ list next year. One example this season are the embellished handbags. These fun bags with stars, hearts, moons, and beading can be super fun for some nights out but really shouldn’t be a big part of your fashion budget. I’d look to stores like Zara or Topshop for great versions at an affordable price.” —Mr. Hernandez
Gray checked blazers took over the street style scene and our Instagram feeds this past season, but the trend is just getting started. Flourishing into full-on plaid, the print was everywhere from the runways to the street style set outside the shows. From colorful coats to menswear-inspired blazers to unexpected plaid accessories, there are endless ways to weave the trend into your wardrobe this year.
For the 2016 Pirelli Calendar, Annie Leibovitz chose to photograph women whose achievements demonstrate a different kind of beauty from what the calendar has traditionally showcased. I'm still shocked to be included among so many people who've long influenced not just my work, but how I see the world, and try to see myself. Annie photographed me one year earlier in the pink velvet dress I'd originally bought for prom, in my parents' backyard. At that time, it was still my backyard, too, and had functioned since I was a little kid as a personal photo studio, study, and consistent reminder that I was bigger than I had been the year before, and the year before that, and that this would only keep happening. (I'm still v short, but: relatively speaking.) It was where I learned that as your childhood shrinks around you, so will your sense of wonder, unless you choose to pay close attention to what surrounds you at new heights. When Annie shot me for Pirelli, we were just a few blocks from my new home in NYC. A lot happens in that first year, and not knowing the geography of the city makes every encounter feel totally isolated from the rest of the world, like a castle on a cloud. At the time of this shoot, I was parsing what in this year had seemed significant just because it was new, and then what was enriching. I was exhausted by the sheen, and desperate to develop a kind of discernment which would make me so healthy, so OK with myself, that genuine wonder would return--gravitation towards stuff that isn't just shiny, but illuminates the same sorts of truths I'd learned as a fan of Patti, Yoko, and other women who happen to be in this calendar, too. I decided to cut my hair on the shoot, rid myself of any excess. Annie made me feel completely comfortable, like I was the same person as the year before, but indeed older. Again, still very physically short. My foot is peeking out of that shoe. I urge you to look at the other portraits, all so stunning, bold & nearly impossible to turn away from. They are strongest as a group, but I wanted to share what mine means to me and thank you for following what I do in such a way that has allowed for this to happen.
True style is really learning to take a look and make it all your own. Whether you add a personal accessory — like something vintage or ethnic — or you wear a look that's all your own (maybe you like to mix in '80s pieces with modern or you like to wear color-blocked looks everyday) finding your signature style is one of the most rewarding things about really loving fashion.

Dylan Suarez of Color Me Nana stresses the importance of your reader-base. “Keep a conversation going with other bloggers out there,” she suggests. “Click on the comments on the blogs you like and research new people in the community you don’t know,” adding, “If you like the content, leave a comment! Or send an email. It’s all a domino effect. Blogging is very much built on community and conversation, so that has to be the main focus.”
If you also purchased this sweater recently - or already had one like it in your closet - here’s another way to wear it! In my first outfit, I paired it with jeans, sneakers and hot pink accessories. This look is so different it hardly feels like the same sweater, and gives you even more bang for your buck by making it work for occasions beyond weekend casual. It’s written all over my face - this is such a fun, colorful look!   

Much like suiting, the trench is not going anywhere anytime soon. The closet staple got an update for spring especially at Burberry, where newly installed creative director Riccardo Tisci presented many variations on the classic coat. A favorite (and a much-Instagrammed version!) was a beige trench coated in pearls and feathers. At Max Mara, Givenchy, and Valentino, the classic coat also made an appearance.

With top-tier fashion bloggers raking in multimillion-dollar campaigns, it’s no wonder every self-proclaimed fashionista wants to launch a personal style site. But not all outfit posts are created equal. These fashion bloggers stand out from the pack thanks to their one-of-a-kind sartorial sense and sharp business acumen. Click through the slideshow above to meet the dynamic women ruling the blogosphere and our picks for the best fashion blogs of 2018. May the best blog win.

Emily Schuman is a former Conde Nast staffer (including a stint at Teen Vogue), who in 2008 combined her love of fashion, beauty, and food to launch her website "Cupcakes and Cashmere." Today, Emily has published a best-selling book inspired by her blog, and is the entrepreneur behind a clothing line that's sold at major retailers, including Nordstrom and Bloomingdales, as well as her own e-commerce lifestyle site. On Cupcakes and Cashmere, Emily shares her evolving fashion style through outfit posts, which tend toward casually chic everyday looks, many involving denim, black trousers, or sheath dresses. More »
Other than being a really strong fashion statement, you should know that a suit, and all menswear in general, is more comfortable than most women’s clothes. You shouldn’t wear anything frumpy or too baggy, that’s not the point at all. Finding a women’s suit which will fit like it’s tailored has never been easier, you’ll still feel feminine, just a dash more powerful.
The ruffles perchance that dominated last summer will endure next year. For all those bored with languid, smooth shapes, cascades of frills subverted childlike associations this season. Simone Rocha's felt off-kilter, and Yves Saint Laurent's had a 1980s Prince appeal. Marc Jacobs, never one to buck to commercialism, designed his with dramatic flourishes and fantastical feathers.
About Blog Cella Jane is a personal life and personal style blog written by Becky Hillyard. It was founded in 2012 as an outlet for Becky's love for fashion and beauty. Cella Jane became a place to showcase and document her personal style on a daily basis. Today, readers can expect to see topics ranging from fashion, beauty, fitness, baby, motherhood, and much more. 

II. My understanding of death deepens. I think I'd always assumed I'd at least get to watch my funeral go down and have a few suspicions confirmed concerning who would write awkward "Happy Birthday! Miss you :(" messages on my Facebook wall long after I'd passed. I thought I'd get to still see how this whole "world" thing turns out: Do we all explode? Do things start to suck less first? Does everyone get sick of technology and start to live like the Amish, inspired by that one episode of Arthur? DO PEOPLE STILL WATCH ARTHUR?
Everything is now a matter of life and death. Math homework: NOT A PRIORITY WHEN THE END COULD BE RIGHT AROUND THE CORNER. Cleaning my room: IS THIS REALLY HOW I WANT TO SPEND MY LAST HOURS ON EARTH WHEN I COULD GET HIT BY A CAR TOMORROW? Etc. The habit that blog-keeping instilled in me of compulsively archiving every single thing only worsens. If I get behind in my journal, I spend hours wondering where to even start. I can't pay attention in class, only make scattered notes where there should be a timeline of the Industrial Revolution, listing all the details I need to get down properly as soon as I have time: The music we listened to in Claire's room, the old man I saw on my way to school, the view from my boyfriend's car when we sat in a 7-Eleven parking lot watching people walk in and trying to predict their purchases, along with a record of what each person looked like and what they bought. My hands tremble, relaxing only once everything has been sufficiently documented, each memory in my grasp, as if by putting them down on paper, I can make them last forever.
“Not enough people have heard of decision fatigue. Decision fatigue is the result of making too many decisions during the course of the day. All of these little decisions add up and actually drain the brain of decision-making power later on. So don’t waste your brainpower in the morning trying to get dressed. Instead get rid of things you can’t or don’t wear regularly and simplify your wardrobe to pieces you like. Keep your clothing simple, so you will have the energy to tackle life’s tougher problems.” —Dan Moyer Jr., stylist and national director of social media for Closet Factory   You should finally get rid of these articles of clothing and accessories in your closet.
Mason, who writes a monthly column for Marie Claire and designed her own collection for Modcloth last fall, is one of the most in-demand bloggers working right now. The 29-year-old writer played a role in the promotion and social media around Target's new plus-size collection Ava & Viv and is also a budding TV personality, offering style advice on programs including "Today" and "Good Morning America." Mason is notable because she uses her blog as a platform to discuss bigger social issues, including race, sexuality and body image. 
I'm not saying that you have to be perfect all the time. It's absolutely fine to make mistakes, because it's sometimes the only way for you to learn and improve your style. I encourage you to get to know yourself better, simply by exposing yourself to new styles and clothes. Experimenting and having fun with fashion is the key to evolving your style.
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