A handbag is one of the most versatile and important accessories that a woman can own. There’s no such thing as “one too many” when it comes to bags and purses, but pay attention to what type is the best for you. Sure, you’ll need different ones for different occasions,so your should at least have three different kinds for starters – small, medium and large. From styles traditionally considered masculine to typical high end women’s handbags, there is nothing you can’t combine with the right clothes depending on the occasion. After that, you should concentrate on the type you use the most, which is also the type which will get worn out the fastest. That is why you should have more of them – if you switch them regularly, they will last longer.
Mirror mirror on the wall... (end the caption, be creative )😏| Photo and editing : @rommisantos #lookdujour#lookdeldia#lookdodia#tenueoftheday#outfitdujour#todayimwearing#blogmode#outfitoftoday###outfitdujour#goingoutlook#todaysoutfit#todayslook#myoutfit#fashionblogger#outfitideas#ootd#instagirl#look#fashion#fashionstyle#ootdstyle #ootdwomen#personalstyle#bloggersofinstagram#ootdlovers#fashiondaily
About Blog The Darling Detail, LLC is an Austin-based fashion and inspiration blog designed to emphasize on-trend, classic, and everyday details with a specific focus on fast fashion, professional photography and relatable writing. By incorporating a chic, feminine and darling-esque style with inspiring details that are affordable, attainable and on-trend. 

Designers went big on all things animalia. For fall, we saw heavy coats and structured jackets in leopard spots and zebra stripes, but for spring, it is all in the unique animal-print details. We loved JW Anderson’s puff leopard-print sleeves and Richard Quinn’s excessive over-the-top take on spots, while Burberry’s mix of zebra on the top and spots on the bottom felt fun and fresh.
Fashion is a multibillion-dollar industry that has considerable impact on the way ordinary people dress and present themselves and relies heavily on media and advertising to communicate the producer's preferences and goals and influence public perception through various types of promotion; at the same time, fashion can be influenced by social change and counter-trends outside the producer, retailer or advertiser's control. As fashion is driven by trends within and without the fashion industry, fashion blogs and other "new media" outside the control of traditional establishment represent a disruptive innovation to the social dynamics of mass media and fashion consumption in modern consumer society. It is likely that the blogosphere will have a considerable long-term influence on the industry, as the number of fashion based blogs continue to grow, with increasing numbers of consumers able to create and modify the media that they consume, and traditional producers and advertisers adapting their practices to avoid dilution of their own influence.
In the past years, American Express has become increasingly involved in New York City Fashion Week, and in 2010 American Express sponsored Evolving Influence, the first international bloggers conference in New York City. During the conference, many surveys and studies took place about the usefulness and tactics used in fashion blogs. During the study it was found that bloggers are more comfortable reporting in real-time and incorporating social tools in their opinions of runway trends and designers. After Fashion Week, it was found that 6.37% of all articles written about or related to Fashion Week had mentioned the Evolving Influence main sponsor, American Express. These blogs were not directly paid to mention American Express, so they served as a free source of advertisement for American Express.[13]
For the 2016 Pirelli Calendar, Annie Leibovitz chose to photograph women whose achievements demonstrate a different kind of beauty from what the calendar has traditionally showcased. I'm still shocked to be included among so many people who've long influenced not just my work, but how I see the world, and try to see myself. Annie photographed me one year earlier in the pink velvet dress I'd originally bought for prom, in my parents' backyard. At that time, it was still my backyard, too, and had functioned since I was a little kid as a personal photo studio, study, and consistent reminder that I was bigger than I had been the year before, and the year before that, and that this would only keep happening. (I'm still v short, but: relatively speaking.) It was where I learned that as your childhood shrinks around you, so will your sense of wonder, unless you choose to pay close attention to what surrounds you at new heights. When Annie shot me for Pirelli, we were just a few blocks from my new home in NYC. A lot happens in that first year, and not knowing the geography of the city makes every encounter feel totally isolated from the rest of the world, like a castle on a cloud. At the time of this shoot, I was parsing what in this year had seemed significant just because it was new, and then what was enriching. I was exhausted by the sheen, and desperate to develop a kind of discernment which would make me so healthy, so OK with myself, that genuine wonder would return--gravitation towards stuff that isn't just shiny, but illuminates the same sorts of truths I'd learned as a fan of Patti, Yoko, and other women who happen to be in this calendar, too. I decided to cut my hair on the shoot, rid myself of any excess. Annie made me feel completely comfortable, like I was the same person as the year before, but indeed older. Again, still very physically short. My foot is peeking out of that shoe. I urge you to look at the other portraits, all so stunning, bold & nearly impossible to turn away from. They are strongest as a group, but I wanted to share what mine means to me and thank you for following what I do in such a way that has allowed for this to happen.
A sloppily cuffed jean. An ill-fitting blazer. A dress that shows just a little too much to be referred to as "tastefully sheer." These are the things that fashion editors and stylists can spot from a million miles away. To those in the biz, the proper proportions of a crop top may be obvious, but for those seeing the trends in a magazine or online, it can be a little trickier to know exactly how to wear everything.
If you invest in one dress style next season, make sure it has ruching - a romantic take on body-con, and much more forgiving. Carefully-positioned ruching has mighty figure-enhancing potential; it adds curves to slimmer frames and those with curvier silhouettes will appreciate its ability to stretch in the right places. Givenchy balanced ruched detailing with accordion pleating to create a dress that will be at the top of many wishlists next season, while Calvin Klein used it to cinch it in the waist.

How to actually do it: "Don't give people too many things to look at all at once," says Halbreich. "If you're wearing a low-cut dress, focus on the cleavage—you don't also need bare arms and legs." The concept applies to fit as well: A body-hugging dress is better with a more sensible neckline and hem, whereas a skirt that hits a few inches above the knee won't raise eyebrows if it's flared rather than tight.
“One of the most important things that people need to realize is that just because they buy something in their ‘size,’ doesn’t mean that it’s going to fit them. People get very invested in being a certain size but this is a huge mistake as different designers cut for different body types and also, many companies ‘play with size’ in order to flatter customers. Buy what fits, regardless of the number on the tag.” —Michael O’Connor, personal stylist
During the 2011 New York City Fashion Week, top-tier fashion designers, Lazaro Hernandez and Jack McCollough (owners and designers of Proenza Schouler), took the time out of their ‘hectic schedules’ during fashion week to help promote the work of fashion bloggers. The two were interviewed by Imran Amed, founder and editor of The Business of Fashion website. In the 5:15 minute long interview, the two fashion designers were asked various questions from an audience of fashion bloggers, including their personal opinions on the effects of fashion blog writing, how it influences the fashion industry as a whole, and how fashion blog posts affects their designing and selling process. When asked about their thoughts on the overall effect of the fashion blogs, McCollough stated, “Blogs posting things about us, going viral, spreading throughout the internet… it has an extraordinary impact on the business”. They also stated how in the past, they would have to wait three, four days to hear a review on their line, but now the feedback comes almost instant. When asked about how the blogs directly affect their own designs, they explained while they do read numerous blogs daily, they try to take each criticism (positive or negative) with a grain of salt, “We try not to obsess over it” stated McCollough.[4]
Kyrzayda Rodriguez is a full-time blogger and mom who is known for her signature haircut, fierce fashion sense and fit physique. Her fashion blog is where you can get inspired by her daily, effortlessly cool outfits. Kyrzayda has a fun, positive and passionate approach to life that shines through all of her style photos, and her fashion choices often include statement coats, over-sized sunglasses, shredded denim, a good amount of sparkle, and bold accessories that you'll want to borrow. More »
If you’re anything like me, one of your favorite pasttimes, amongst Netflix bingeing and cake baking, is looking at fashion blogs and borderline-stalking bloggers on their websites and social media accounts for outfit inspo. This is a great and enjoyable hobby to have, but can be disheartening if you’re a college student and can barely afford a Venti Starbucks, much less a Valentino purse. Most fashion blogs seem to be full of designer accessories and expensive jeans. But style is style, regardless of the price tag or brand, and whether you spend $5 or $500 on sunglasses, fashion is for all of us.

Vancouver, Canada–based blogger Vanessa Hong manages not only her wildly successful blog, The Haute Pursuit, but also her accompanying fashion line, THP Shop, which is beloved by editors and street style stars alike. She's also a mainstay at every fashion week and a street style star in her own right—photographers love shooting her uniquely edgy, contemporary style.


Blogger Krystal Bick is the woman behind "This Time Tomorrow," a fashion blog that covers style, travel, art, dating, and other topics related to living in New York City. A transplanted West Coaster, Krystal's fashion vibe is a true blend of East and West coast American style (or you could say, girlfriend meets boyfriend style). Her looks tend to gravitate toward classic, tailored pieces inspired by menswear, but often with feminine and quirky accents thrown in, such as a pair of cropped patterned trousers, a silky blouse, high heel pumps, and an over-sized men's watch. More »
You cannot move forward if you choose to look backward. My Uncle Joe, who was an Ojibwa, married to my cousin, often said as long as the chiefs can keep my people hostage on reserves they'll never amount to anything. Joe was a wise man, wiser than all the politicians and and self serving chiefs, because one day the younger generation will leave the reserves and become full participants in society, hopefully enjoying equal benefits as well as equal responsibility.

In a study conducted through the Biz360 Community, it was found that over 53% of the New York City Fashion Week converge had come from online articles and fashion blogs. While a vast portion of what was written in these blogs came from various mainstream fashion resource magazine and newspaper articles, such as Coutorture and New York Magazine, these fashion blogs provided a larger viewing and reading audience for the fashion week.[13]
Everything is now a matter of life and death. Math homework: NOT A PRIORITY WHEN THE END COULD BE RIGHT AROUND THE CORNER. Cleaning my room: IS THIS REALLY HOW I WANT TO SPEND MY LAST HOURS ON EARTH WHEN I COULD GET HIT BY A CAR TOMORROW? Etc. The habit that blog-keeping instilled in me of compulsively archiving every single thing only worsens. If I get behind in my journal, I spend hours wondering where to even start. I can't pay attention in class, only make scattered notes where there should be a timeline of the Industrial Revolution, listing all the details I need to get down properly as soon as I have time: The music we listened to in Claire's room, the old man I saw on my way to school, the view from my boyfriend's car when we sat in a 7-Eleven parking lot watching people walk in and trying to predict their purchases, along with a record of what each person looked like and what they bought. My hands tremble, relaxing only once everything has been sufficiently documented, each memory in my grasp, as if by putting them down on paper, I can make them last forever. 

On the flip side, this option is “free”, but is going to take more time on your end. Before you reach out to an expert for advice, make sure you do your homework. Experts are often busy people. Make sure you search if they answered the questions you want to ask before. Skim through their blogs, Twitter, check if they’ve been interviewed on a podcast or magazine. If you can’t find the answer you’re looking for, only then should you consider reaching out to them. For that, I highly recommend reading this post: “How to get the attention of your favorite expert”
There are both free and premium choices for your blog’s WordPress theme, with extreme price differences, ranging from $3 to $1,000. It definitely makes sense for to sift through the free themes first, because there are so many options and you’ll get a better idea of what you want. Plus, themes are like clothes shopping; you can try the theme on to check the fit before making your selection. Most theme repositories, including WordPress’ own wordpress.org, give you the opportunity to preview a theme before downloading, installing or even paying for it.
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