Dress Your Age: Janice Dickinson doesn't look 57, but she is. We're not going to lie, she looks great, but let's face it, it's a tad tacky when 50-somethings try sporting an outfit you'd normally find on 20-somethings — and vice versa. However, tinsel town allows celebrities more leeway than the real world does for us ordinary folk. As a rule of thumb, stick to age appropriate attire.
Fashion is a multibillion-dollar industry that has considerable impact on the way ordinary people dress and present themselves and relies heavily on media and advertising to communicate the producer's preferences and goals and influence public perception through various types of promotion; at the same time, fashion can be influenced by social change and counter-trends outside the producer, retailer or advertiser's control. As fashion is driven by trends within and without the fashion industry, fashion blogs and other "new media" outside the control of traditional establishment represent a disruptive innovation to the social dynamics of mass media and fashion consumption in modern consumer society. It is likely that the blogosphere will have a considerable long-term influence on the industry, as the number of fashion based blogs continue to grow, with increasing numbers of consumers able to create and modify the media that they consume, and traditional producers and advertisers adapting their practices to avoid dilution of their own influence.
There was a refreshing shift on the runways this season, and it had little to do with the clothes and everything to do with the casting. While plenty of new faces graced the catwalks as usual, the real surprise was the reappearance of some of the greatest models of the ’90s. Yasmin Le Bon walked at Calvin Klein, Stella Tennant and Georgina Grenville starred at Ferragamo, and Shalom Harlow — who hasn’t set foot on the runway in years — closed Versace (in a floral lace gown and a cloud of her natural ringlets). These women added to the shows a kind of diversity that has been lacking: a range of ages. They also lent strength to the collections, thanks in part to their walks: the powerful, showstopping strides of the original supermodels. — MALINA JOSEPH GILCHRIST, style director, women’s, T magazine

Devoting this much time to your closet is unnecessary if you don’t take care of all those clothes you’ve carefully chosen. One quality iron, a nice detergent and a couple of seconds you should devote to checking the instructions on a garment is all it takes, so don’t be lazy. There is something for everyone on this list, and the truth of the matter is that mastering some fashion basics will allow you to develop and polish up a unique style that suits you very well and let’s you stand out, but has a universally aesthetic quality to it at the same time.

Dress For Women, Not For Men:The Man Repeller once told us that if women dressed for men, we'd all be wearing bodycon miniskirts and dresses. This is why we have to dress with other women in mind. It actually makes getting dressed easier when you're dressing for style, not for sex, and your confidence will shine through because you'll be more comfortable in what you're wearing.
“You don’t have to spend an arm and a leg to look fantastic, however, we do tend to feel and act a little different when we wear things that are expensive. We treat those things differently too; with more care. We tell ourselves that they are special and that we are special when we wear them. But really it’s the mental story we assign to those items that make them special. Expensive things might trigger those feelings more easily but you can shine just as bright every day with ordinary things, just by acting as you would if they were expensive.” —Jennifer Lowe, stylist and designer for Water Vixen Swim    Learn some more ways you can use clothing to influence your mood.
A sloppily cuffed jean. An ill-fitting blazer. A dress that shows just a little too much to be referred to as "tastefully sheer." These are the things that fashion editors and stylists can spot from a million miles away. To those in the biz, the proper proportions of a crop top may be obvious, but for those seeing the trends in a magazine or online, it can be a little trickier to know exactly how to wear everything. 

Photo by @roseolm of #thecruciblebroadway opening night bow. I am so proud of and moved by everyone in this show, night after night, and thrilled for any audience member who gets to see what they've all brought to characters I thought I knew well enough from English class. My heart is very full right now!!! This was Thursday, 3/31, which is also the date of my first Style Rookie post 8 years ago. What a bizarre course of events. Thank you for following them, reading, watching--I hope you can catch this one too. ❤
The ‘80s have been back for quite a few seasons now, but there seems to be no stopping this trend. In past seasons, designers have referenced the decade’s big shoulders and glam hues. This season, many designers brought in acid-washed denim. The trend kicked off in New York, with Proenza Schouler sending out a bevy of almost whitewashed denim dresses, trousers, and jackets, and culminated in Paris, where Chanel, Dior, and Stella McCartney jumped on board.
I like how you said that business women should invest in quality, staple pieces for their outfits. I think that it’s so important, especially in the workplace, to make a good impression on your clients and your managers. My friend just started a business, and is trying to figure out in which types of outfits she ought to invest. I’ll have to recommend that she find a women’s clothing retailer in her area that can offer quality, staple pieces for her to look and feel confident in the workplace.
Other commercially successful independent fashion blogs include Budget Fashionista, which reportedly brings in $600,000 a year in revenue[23] and The Bag Snob, which "generates a six-figure income, mainly from advertising". By 2008 SheFinds.com was generating $400,000 in revenue per year.[24] Personal style bloggers like Aimee Song from SongofStyle.com has told WWD that she gets paid anywhere from a couple thousand to 50,000 dollars for hosting an event or Instagramming a brand.[25]
The New York-based Eadie, 29, is best known for her accessible, yet educated, approach to fashion. Based in San Francisco when she launched the blog, Eadie has worked as a merchandiser for brands like Gap and Tory Burch, which means she has a professional edge when it comes to outfit posts. And brands like love working with her because she has a reputation for converting readers into shoppers. 

“Sure everyone’s style should be dress to be true to themselves and not look like someone else but fashion insiders know that style is a journey not a destination. One way to fast-track that is to identify style icons that speak to you. Look for what aspects of their style specifically you relate to. Pinterest boards can be a great help. From there put your style into words, to help guide you through the exploration to develop your style.” —Mr. Jones
The Daileigh’s Ashleigh Hutchinson offers articles and courses to help her readers build the perfect closet. She aims to help women aged 20-70 to create a style they love. Ashleigh includes quite a few fashion eBooks on her site, as well as blog posts and beautiful fashion photography. She even holds online webinars to help people improve their fashion sense.
There are different ways to avoid calluses, which can really make your day difficult. Most of those problems come from high heels, right? Up until now, I’ve tried different kinds of methods, and the most effective one includes the freezer, believe it or not. If you fill a couple of freezer bags with water, place them in your shoes, and put them into your freezer to stay overnight, you’ll be able to see a huge difference in the morning.
“I wish people understood that in fashion less is more.  For example, if you are wearing an off-the-shoulder top, make that your focal point. You don’t need anything else. Huge earrings or a statement necklace will be overwhelming—the top is sexy chic as is!” —Jennifer Berger, stylist and president of Wear it Well   These fashion mistakes are making you look older.
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