The blogosphere has indeed opened up many doors for the fashion industry, one of which is allowing the ordinary people to partake in the 'elite' fashion world and discuss their likes and dislikes on the way fashion is presented in the media.[6] In 2008, the Pulitzer Prize winning fashion writer and former blogger Robin Givhan, claimed that fashion blogs had democratized the fashion industry. Givhan had also written in Harpers Bazaar that 'The rise of the fashion blogger has evolved [fashion] from an aristocratic business dominated by omnipotent designers into a democratic one in which everyone has access to stylistic clothes...the average people, too often estranged from fashion, is not taking ownership of it'.[7] A similar statement was said by Constance White, the style director for E-bay and former fashion journalist, saying that the impact of the fashion blogosphere has allowed the whole population to take ownership of the fashion world, including people of all different races, genders, and social standings.[8] The Daily Mail writer Karen Kay suggested once in an interview that blogs allow anyone to both critique and praise designers, regardless of the often ‘needed’ professional opinion, with the help fashion blogs, the consumers are helping to set the trends.[9]
How to actually do it: "Figure out your go-to, foolproof looks," says designer Nanette Lepore, then seek out variations on that theme. Stumped? Picture the outfits that you feel most comfortable in. Or ask people close to you what you look best in. Once you've zeroed in on what works, find different takes. "I gravitate toward jackets, so I'll do a bomber style, then a silk version, or a denim jacket with leather sleeves," says Minkoff. "Whenever you feel the need to talk yourself into things, that's a red flag that you shouldn't buy them," says Minkoff. If you have doubts in the dressing room, it may help to take a photo of yourself in the item, suggests Aerin Lauder, the founder and creative director of the lifestyle brand Aerin. "It's much more accurate than looking in the mirror."
Athleisure is the trend that keeps giving, and its latest offering is as unexpected as it is stylish. The bike shorts were worn with blazers by many style-savvy showgoers this fashion month. Offering a fresh blend of sportswear and tailoring, the look was both striking and chic. Of course, while it may not be appropriate for either the office or the gym, the outfit is perfect for strutting the streets or attending Sunday brunch with your best friends. So, don’t be afraid to try it for yourself.
“The key to having great style is to buy things that fit you properly (or have them altered by a tailor). If you’re not sure, a good rule of thumb is if you have to adjust it more than once while you’re trying it on then it’s not for you. It should feel comfortable.” —Lindsay Narain, designer, founder and creative director of Vaughan clothing    Learn some surprising fixes you didn’t even know tailors could make.
This style is practically impossible to imagine without our fave denim pieces. The reason is that denim is practical and comfortable. For instance, you can put on skinny jeans with a short tunic or a light blouse with romantic flare design, of course, not forgetting about the fact that this style doesn’t absolutely bear glamorous details like beads, glitter, or rhinestones.
Clean Out Your Closet: Those items that just seem to hang in our closet season after season -- or even year after year -- that we always say we'll wear, but don't, need to get tossed at some point. Donate them or do a clothing swap! You'll be making room for new clothes, which is always good. Better yet, incorporate the 'one in, one out' philosophy into your closet -- when something new comes home, something old gets permanently loaned to a friend.
True style is really learning to take a look and make it all your own. Whether you add a personal accessory — like something vintage or ethnic — or you wear a look that's all your own (maybe you like to mix in '80s pieces with modern or you like to wear color-blocked looks everyday) finding your signature style is one of the most rewarding things about really loving fashion.

Fashion blogs first appeared in the blogosphere prior to 2002,[16] and Kathryn Finney, founder of Budget Fashionista, was invited to New York Fashion Week as early as September 2003;[14] a short time later, Fashiontribes.com was being seated fourth row at shows like Bill Blass. Paris-based American fashion blogger Diane Pernet, founder of A Shaded View on Fashion[18], has been called "the original style blogger[19]" by The New York Times, and has been a fashion blogger since 2005[20].
Kathleen’s blog was created out of the realization that post-grad life wasn’t as fabulous as Carrie Bradshaw had led her to believe (even as adults, we’re still trying to solve the puzzle of how Carrie could afford a closet-full of Manolos on a writer’s salary). But looking at her inspiring outfits and picture-perfect lifestyle, you might have to disagree that it is extremely fabulous (except she pulls it all off with affordable pieces and doable outfit ideas).
Less Really Is More: Indecent exposure isn't classy. Celebrity stylist Jen Rade, who has dressed many beauties including Angelina Jolie, told In Style that only one body part should be exposed at a time. If you're baring your decolletage, don't also show off your legs. Remember ladies, a little bit of mystery is alluring. Some things are better left to the imagination. Source: In Style
Dress For Women, Not For Men:The Man Repeller once told us that if women dressed for men, we'd all be wearing bodycon miniskirts and dresses. This is why we have to dress with other women in mind. It actually makes getting dressed easier when you're dressing for style, not for sex, and your confidence will shine through because you'll be more comfortable in what you're wearing.
The four dresses I’m wearing in today’s post, and everything below is under $100. Nordstrom has something on a budget for everyone – no matter the color, shape, or size you are looking for, and no matter the occasion. Whether it’s sequins for New Year’s, red for Christmas, or pastels and prints for your next holiday parties and soirees – they’ve got it.

About Blog I'm Brittany Xavier and I began my personal style blog. My style is versatile, casual, comfortable and a bit edgy. My blog first started out as only fashion but over the last three years so much of it really includes the lifestyle aspect of my everyday life. A blog to highlight my affordable finds as well as brands I find worth the splurge, those investment pieces I'll wear again and again.
Just like your posts on trending topics, the best pitch to a media outlet is a story that relates to something that’s currently hot in the news or that’s coming up around the corner. (For example: Pitch a local morning show on presenting fall fashion trends from stores all found in your city.) You’ll also want to show your credibility by linking to past guest posts, media mentions, or accomplishments, as well as why you’re the perfect expert for the story. No, it’s not easy, and it does take time, but as you build your blog and following, it’ll become easier to pitch yourself.
Fashion’s most unflattering women’s wear trend is far from a spot in our rearview mirrors. Skintight bike shorts pedaled their way onto scores of runways once again this season, having first emerged as a ’90s throwback reference at Off-White this time last year. At Fendi, in a look sported by Bella Hadid, they were long, navy and spandex, with shimmering streaks and a matching leather waist belt. At Roberto Cavalli, Paul Surridge presented a pair for after dark, in ochre with blue sequined embroidery. Over in Paris, the first look from the new creative director at Mugler, Casey Cadwallader, was an oversize, seamed black blazer and — you guessed it — matching biking shorts. And Jacquemus opted for an unforgiving knitted tangerine variation, to be worn with an oversize white shirt and the swagger of someone comfortable with having everything on show. Saddle up! — ELIZABETH PATON, European correspondent, Styles
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