This site is a go-to for fashion-forward women who are shopping on a budget. Not only is the site dedicated to recreating celebrity looks with cheaper options (that look very similar, if not identical!), but it also is a source for style tips and the latest trends. See an outfit you love on Chrissy Teigen? Just hop over to the site to find out how to have it without spending three months worth of paychecks.
What this style absolutely excludes is anything that’s official, taken from business looks or other subcultures. All the rest is welcome. Casual style is suitable for every woman with any type of figure, which is also very important. An example of this style can be an interesting top, some minimalistic shorts, a creative handbag, and a light scarf.
Donate Clothes You'll Never Wear: Stop hoarding. If you haven't worn it recently, then you probably never will. To help decide if you should toss it or not, the experts at Apartment Therapy suggest you answer the following questions: Do you like cut, fabric and colour? Are you comfortable wearing it? Does it fit you now (no, not if you lose 3 inches off your waist in the next month)? Can any damages like stains or holes be fixed? Do you have more than one place to wear it? Can it be combined with other articles of clothing in your closet? When was the last time you wore it (if it's been over a year, nix it)? Source: Apartment Therapy
There was basic black — this is fashion week, after all — and monochrome white (the new black?) on the runways of Paris, but some of the season’s most energetic looks put it all on the table, with graphic treatments of black and white. For the bravest and boldest among us, there are stripes (at Dries Van Noten), checkerboard checks (at Balenciaga) and bifurcated blocks of color (at Louis Vuitton): racing gear, even if only for the rat race. — M.S.
Two styles of shorts prevailed on the catwalks - cycling shorts or board shorts. Not everyone will feel brave to wear the numerous stretch styles that were worn with jackets at Chanel and solo at Stella McCartney, so Prada's duchesse satin board shorts - available in muted jewel tones - will provide an alternative. Rejina Pyo's slouchy green style will also prove popular as the weather heats up.
Vancouver, Canada–based blogger Vanessa Hong manages not only her wildly successful blog, The Haute Pursuit, but also her accompanying fashion line, THP Shop, which is beloved by editors and street style stars alike. She's also a mainstay at every fashion week and a street style star in her own right—photographers love shooting her uniquely edgy, contemporary style.
"Every woman really only needs 20 core items in her closet," advises Nazarudin. "A black pair of pants, a blue blazer, a cashmere V-neck sweater in a jewel tone, and so on." Outside of these 20, you can experiment with more inexpensive items — if you don't like them, it's not nearly as bad as if you dropped $300 on a trendy piece you only wore once. If you need tips on how to maximize your basics, check out Good Housekeeping Style Director Lori Bergamotto's weeklong experiment in wearing the same thing every day.
Rookie Yearbook Four, the print edition of our fourth year, comes out October 20: 352 pages of beautiful writing and art by young people, plus print-only contributions from people like Amandla Stenberg, Kiernan Shipka, Jazz Jennings, Dev Hynes of Blood Orange, Emma Roberts, Sarah Paulson, Charli XCX, DeJ Loaf, Ezra Koenig of Vampire Weekend, Florence Welch of Florence and the Machine, Donna Tartt, Shamir, Chloe of Kitten, Rashida Jones, Tracee Ellis Ross, Joy Williams, Hayley Williams of Paramore, Lorde, Tyler Ford, Ariana Grande, Edward Droste of Grizzly Bear, Solange, and Willow Smith. WHEW. See also: stickers, posters, a cut-out diorama and banner, ET CETERA FOREVER. I've never been able to choose a favorite Rookie Yearbook until now. It is our final one (senior year!) and I can't wait for Rookies THE WORLD OVER to see it. (Mr. Burns laugh, but in the name of good things like self-esteem and creativity.)
How to actually do it: First, a disclaimer. There's no need to break the bank on the basics—tees, button-downs, jeans—of which there are plenty of quality options available at low prices. Instead, splurge (if you can) on the types of items in which even the cheapo versions aren't exactly steals. For instance, bargain cashmere will still set you back $100. But that sweater will stretch out quickly, and then you'll have to blow another $100 to replace it, rather than spending a little more only once. "When buying classics, like a great black blazer, it's important to invest in better fabrics— say, wool—that will hold up better over time," says Minkoff. Try calculating the price per wear to help stave off sticker shock.

You know how some people simply know how to wear the right clothes? There’s no mystery there, and actually, you could pull it off, too, by just thinking about what you’re wearing a little bit more. It all depends on how your body is built – you should tend to accent your features in the right way. For example, wearing V neck will make your torso look longer, and wearing nude pups will do miracles for the length of your legs. Embrace your shape and learn to love all its imperfections. 

Fashion’s most unflattering women’s wear trend is far from a spot in our rearview mirrors. Skintight bike shorts pedaled their way onto scores of runways once again this season, having first emerged as a ’90s throwback reference at Off-White this time last year. At Fendi, in a look sported by Bella Hadid, they were long, navy and spandex, with shimmering streaks and a matching leather waist belt. At Roberto Cavalli, Paul Surridge presented a pair for after dark, in ochre with blue sequined embroidery. Over in Paris, the first look from the new creative director at Mugler, Casey Cadwallader, was an oversize, seamed black blazer and — you guessed it — matching biking shorts. And Jacquemus opted for an unforgiving knitted tangerine variation, to be worn with an oversize white shirt and the swagger of someone comfortable with having everything on show. Saddle up! — ELIZABETH PATON, European correspondent, Styles
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